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tmirrione63

ocean

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Hey guys im a young guy and im not gonna be able to be an owner of a boat for a few years and i was just wondering how big of a boat do you need to be on the ocean.

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I personally don't feel comfortable in anything smaller than 22' on good weather days. You really need to be on top of the forecast and it depends somewhat on the inlet(s) you will be going in and out of.

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Jet ski's and Kayaks go out in the ocean, but then again so did the Titanic. Most days though I'd say the minimum would be a 20 footer. It all depends where you are going to go and what you want to fish for. Most people start with a 20 or 22, then go up.

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I'm new to boating myself and have a 24 footer. I've taken her out to the local recks in the ocean but not too far (3-5 miles). I think a "good boat size" for the ocean really depends on the weather and the experiance of the captain. If you don't know how to handle your boat, no matter what the size you're probably going to be SOL. Weather is probably #1 consideration going out on any size boat and then the captain would be #2. If you're talking about a fair weather days, you can probably even take a dingy out to the ocean (Not recommended!). Just pray that other boats don't speed past next to you and swamp you or throw you. I heard of people taking out their small aluminum boats "in the days" out to the ocean for cod but I'm sure they made sure the weather was perfect, knew what they were doing, and took some chances. Sorry I couln't really answer your question but I believe my 24 footer is very sea worthy. Just need more experience to feel comforatble to take her out further.

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where are you and what do you plan on fishing for. A 25' boat is a big boat. ESPECIALLY for a beginner. Either way I suggest you and your father taking a CG auxiliary or power squadron class. google is your friend ;)

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I have taken a boating class a while ago. and like i said i been on boats for a while.

 

that's good! Just because you have been on boats a while doesn't mean you know what you are doing. Just because someone owns a boat doesn't mean they know what they are doing either lol.. Where do you live?

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up here in the NE, we get some snotty weather. If you are a "fair weather" fisherman, meaning you dont want to be cold, wet, etc., then I would say 24 is the right way to go. The reason I say that is because up here in the NE, we have prevailing south winds, which can kick up some SERIOUS chop during the summer months. Most of your fair weather days(not cloudy, rainy, etc.) in the summer will be with a stiff south wind. Not saying it will happen all the time, but much less than 24, and you have to be VERY selective in the summer. Usually fall and spring you get some calmer winds, usually east or west, both of which lay the ocean down(depending on how far out the island, you may want north winds). I could make it out(just out up to 3 miles for stripers) maybe a dozen times in my 18' bay boat. But I have been driving my own boat/owning my own boat since I was 12, knew the boat, and the nearby waters very well. AND, I had to choose my days very carefully.

 

You can easily get a 20' boat and do quite well, but experience, AND weather will play a major role in when you go out.

 

Another big consideration, not sure on your location, can be the inlets you may have to drive through. I know that I drive out of Barnegat inlet, which is a VERY nasty inlet. On even a decent blow, mid-tide, you can get 10' breakers rolling right through the inlet. Something I got mixed up in a while back, but fortunately escaped with just a little stain in my pants to show for it. A lot of times, inlets, both inside, and right at the mouths, can be worse than the conditions outside in the ocean. Something to definitely be aware of when trying to return. If it was 3-4 in the inlet, when it was 2ft outside, and it grows to 3 ft outside, you can bet your butt it will be a lot bigger in the inlet on your return.

 

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Where you're at, you could get by well with 20' CC if it's a good boat.

A 19' Cape Horn, 20' SeaCraft, 21 Regulator, these boats are very capable for inshore where you live, lots of others too.

That Onslow Bay that there's a thread on, thats a perfect inshore small boat, a 20' vector is great.

 

If you're gonna be trailering, bigger ain't always better unless your well funded.;)

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