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Interview tips

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Well after three months without full time employment, it looks like I have an interview Monday.

It has been 15 years since my last one, wondering if you all have any tips to help.

 

Good, bad, or humorous, let me have them.

 

 

 

 

 

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it really depends...different strategies for differnt jobs, if there will be more than one person, if there will be a series of interviews or its a one round thing etc...can you give some more info?

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When he ask you where you see yourself in five years, tell him banging his wife while cashing the alimony checks they receive from you.

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Chances are it's just me.

And I think it's just one person doing the interview.

 

It's technical, TV commercials delivered to stations via the web.

Duplication of syndicated media.

I have worked in TV as an engineer for over 20 years now.

These folks want more of an operator, than a fix it guy.

Encoding, decoding, duplication, and what not.

 

I actually helped start this company back in the 90's, but I doubt that anyone there currently would know that.

 

 

Also, I run a small biz on the side.

I would not be in competition with them, but I don't want to stop working for myself.

It's easy work with good pay.

 

When he ask you where you see yourself in five years, tell him banging his wife while cashing the alimony checks they receive from you.

Good thinking man, Should I see if he has a daughter?

 

 

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Chances are it's just me.

And I think it's just one person doing the interview.

It's technical, TV commercials delivered to stations via the web.

Duplication of syndicated media.

I have worked in TV as an engineer for over 20 years now.

These folks want more of an operator, than a fix it guy.

Encoding, decoding, duplication, and what not.

I actually helped start this company back in the 90's, but I doubt that anyone there currently would know that.

Also, I run a small biz on the side.

I would not be in competition with them, but I don't want to stop working for myself.

It's easy work with good pay.

 

 

In that case, tell him fighting strenuously the lawsuit filed against you by the weather girl claiming you gave her syphilis.

 

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I dont know too much about that field, but I would imagine your biggest issue is crosswalking what you can do with what they want..sounds like there is a little bit of a disconnect between the two?

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.sounds like there is a little bit of a disconnect between the two?

 

Basically, I am used to building and fixing the systems they want me to operate.

 

There is another position in town that i have applied for.

They stop taking resume's on the 19th. so I would like to give them a little time to contact me before i commit to anything.

 

The other position is more in line with what I do, and would more fun.

(Assistant chief for a group of radio stations)

 

 

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No matter the job always ask them what it takes to be successful in the position.

 

Take their list of successful attributes and give them an example of past behavior where you exhibited each characteristic to demonstrate your ability. The best predictor of future behavior is past behavior and since you have 20 years experience that should be easy for you.

 

Don't ask them anything about money, benefits, work hours, vacation etc......... Once they say they want to hire you you can ask them all those questions and more. Until then just stick to how much you want the position.

 

At the end of the interview ask them what is the next step in the hiring process.

 

Then review their list of successful attributes and your experience/qualifications and tell them you want to be further considered. Then ask them what if any reservations they have about you for the position? This will give you one last chance to address any miscommunication and show them you are open to feedback.

 

Always follow-up in writing by the end of the business day so get the interviewers e-mail address.

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Turn OFF your cell phone before the interview.

 

It might not be fair, or it might be petty, or it might be offensive only to me, but If your cell phone interrupts an interview I'm conducting, there is no way you get the job.

 

Sincerity about your answers is key. Relax. Ask meaningful questions about the expectations of the job, the tasks and projects that need to be completed, and carry the conversation to a point that lets you indicate how you have solved the same problems and how you accomplished similar tasks in your prior employment. Be honest about your failures if asked.

 

I've interviewed hundred of people over the years for very technical positions, and the relaxed, confident ones always shine.

 

Good luck!

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I interview for a living - so just a few things I (we) look for in during an interview:

 

be confident (but not overly) in yourself and your skills

 

don't be over personable - firm hand shake but no tap on the shoulder

 

do not ask how much vacation time / sick time - interviewer can bring it up

 

show interviewer you can be a team player - relate to job description in what you've done in previous positions

 

be honest

 

be well rested - show up 15 minutes early for paperwork

 

bring your drivers license / id / passport / SS

 

dress appropriate

 

don't overdo your cologne / aftershave - seriously - too much just stinks

 

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Ask what you could have done better in the interview. It's a chance to counter any issues they may have. Then ask them what they liked about you that would make you a good candidate for the job. Reinforce those points and leave on a positive note.

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Would it be out of line to want to work a shift or two (unpaid) before saying yes?

 

not sure I would offer that - as a trial / training for you/them ? - what is the position for (sorry if I missed it

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The position is distributing television commercials to stations using the web, and the USPS.

Dealing with audio/video/computer problems.

It would be a trial for me to see if I was comfortable with the working environment.

 

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