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Dexter Russell fillet knife- Wide or narrow blade?

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I've heard Dexter Russell fillet knives are pretty good, so I plan to get one in an 8 inch blade. I know there are two types of blades, narrow and wide, so I was wondering as to which one you think is better. I will be filleting Bluefish, Stripers, porgy and Fluke. Thanks.

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One knife is not best for all

Figure what you're going to be filleting most.

If it's fluke then get the thin and flexible blade.

Bass blues and porgie, the thicker blade

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I have two Dexter Russells, the white handled sani-safe ones with the white poly sheaths. 



 



I started with one, and loved it, but it was a thicker blade which worked great for removing meat from the bones while filletting blues and stripers, but not for getting really close to removing the skin.  I bought a 2nd one, thinner and longer, and now while filletting I use both knives for a batch of fish.



 



Basically, I can zip through removing the fillets really close to the bones for my and friend's fish with the thicker blade, then use the thinner one for removing the skin from the fillets, always having a sharp knife for precision work and trimming at the end.



 



Once I'm finished a dish soap dunk hot water rinse followed by a few passes with both knives over the two stones on a spyderco tri-angle, and I'm good to go for the next time I bring fish home.



 



If you had to get only one, I prefer the narrower blade, because I like the flexibility more than the stiffness to get every bit of meat out that I can.  As Sudsy said however, different knives for different fish and even different sizes of the same fish work best.


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They are right with the advice above but if your set on one single all purpose knife the Dexter 9" Stiff Boner is a good knife. Great for Stripers because of the stiffness but not too stiff. If your good at filletting you can do anything with it. That being said I still use the softer thinner ones for most of my cod, fluke and haddock and the above for Stripers, tuna, etc.

 

Armand

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They are right with the advice above but if your set on one single all purpose knife the Dexter 9" Stiff Boner is a good knife. Great for Stripers because of the stiffness but not too stiff. If your good at filletting you can do anything with it. That being said I still use the softer thinner ones for most of my cod, fluke and haddock and the above for Stripers, tuna, etc.

Armand

 

:laugh: Nice name for a knife.

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Like a narrow knife for fluke, but in all other circumstances, would choose a wider one.  I think the 9 inch wooden handle is the best knife on the planet for cleaning pretty anything that swims around here.  I buy the wide and after a couple of seasons of sharpening, the knife turns into a fluke cleaning machine.   


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Quote:

Originally Posted by Buster3479 View Post


I have two Dexter Russells, the white handled sani-safe ones with the white poly sheaths. 



 



I started with one, and loved it, but it was a thicker blade which worked great for removing meat from the bones while filletting blues and stripers, but not for getting really close to removing the skin.  I bought a 2nd one, thinner and longer, and now while filletting I use both knives for a batch of fish.



 



Basically, I can zip through removing the fillets really close to the bones for my and friend's fish with the thicker blade, then use the thinner one for removing the skin from the fillets, always having a sharp knife for precision work and trimming at the end.



 



Once I'm finished a dish soap dunk hot water rinse followed by a few passes with both knives over the two stones on a spyderco tri-angle, and I'm good to go for the next time I bring fish home.



 



If you had to get only one, I prefer the narrower blade, because I like the flexibility more than the stiffness to get every bit of meat out that I can.  As Sudsy said however, different knives for different fish and even different sizes of the same fish work best.





All good info.  A new wide blade knife out of the package takes patience to get rid of all the skin.  On bass it is not an issue, but for fish with thinner skin it can be tricky.  


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They are faily inexpensive as far as a quality knife goes so do yourself a favor and get both. That old saying "... the right tool for the job..." certainly applies here.

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Just to fill in the issues.

 

The fatter blade really makes short work of fileting something with a little meat to it and rib cage to cut through (awesome for big fish or meaty devils like tuna). The thinner blade for more delicate work and skinning (as above).

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