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Peter Patricelli

And this graph represents.......?

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The graph is a perfect argument for making catch limits = 0 for the Striper.

 

Too many are harvested every year and we will soon be in the Bad Old Days of the 1980's and early 1990's.

 

Regards,

FK

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A disastrous trend for those who like to catch the occasional fish, and a total failure of the government regulatory agencies.

JC

 

No comment on marital capacity.

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Sadly we are used to seeing graphs like that. The trend if you can call it that is worse than alarming. We were so hopeful in the UK that the USA had got your Striper fishery under good sustainable ,management. I can't understand why you would even risk going back to those less than lean years with a collapsed fishery on your hands.

There are faster and bigger fish than a Striper but to me no other fish compares to it. Please take better care of your Fishery.

 

Mike

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IMHO - make this magnificient fish a gamefish only, small slot limit for a dinner fish, one fish per day, tag required to keep a bass over the slot. Sure don't want to relive the late 1970s/1980s decline. Many of the younger guys catching striped bass today have no reference of what it was like to fish during the collapse. Let's hope we do better this time around. Hats off to Brad Burns and the crew of Stripers Forever.

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Yeah,bummer,as it is a long-term slide.But,let's consider some cause for optimism and hope it's about to turnaround...



1) Last year YOY recuritment was well above avg in a # of sampling locations in the Chesapeake area; typical 6-8 fish/samplings were being replaced w/ 24-34/sampling.



2)It has been a very mild winter- less stress to YOY and overwintering adults.



3)The fish hung in Jersey till some time in Jan as it was so warm and there were so many sandeels.That's a month-6wks of eatin they might not've got in any other winter.I've never seen stripes look'n so much like overstuffed sausages.Hopefully all those calories in those well fattened fish and a mild winter will translate to an outstanding spawn this spring.



What can I say? You have to be an optimist to even be a fisherman.



Catch and keep would'nt be a problem if there were sufficient recruitment.Not that I disagree w/ any limits but they are a band-aid,not a solution to the real problems,the largest of which is lack of sufficient food sources,esp bunker.


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We need to establish the origin of that graph. What Tribe or tribes does it represent? Chessy Bay only. The Chessy Bay, Delaware River and Hudson River or the entire east coat starting in Canada and ending in Florida.

 

The actual source that publish it could be illigitimate! Slip and slide makes a good point. The fish we are seeing here in NJ are fat and healty. Especially the schoolies,

San eels forage is stupendus. Last years Chessy Bay yoy number as encouraging. The Hudson River yoy's are above average with two major years in the past ten.

 

2007 matched the highest net haul listed in 1988 with 35 fish pnh, and 7 years between 88 and 07 exceeded 20 fish per net haul. And the Hudson River Mature Feamale age 8+ has been over 60% of the biomass since 1989.

 

The yoy recruitment for all sb stocks measured increase from 7 million to 9.5 millon in 2010. We must remember that the crash in the early 1980's took the stock down to 5 or 6 million. Last years stock assessment is in the the 40 millions of fish. Time to pay attention? You bet. Time to run around flapping our arms and shrieiking is not here yet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The graph is a perfect argument for making catch limits = 0 for the Striper.

Too many are harvested every year and we will soon be in the Bad Old Days of the 1980's and early 1990's.

Regards,

FK

 

Totally agree.

 

Catch and keep would'nt be a problem if there were sufficient recruitment.Not that I disagree w/ any limits but they are a band-aid,not a solution to the real problems,the largest of which is lack of sufficient food sources,esp bunker.

 

I'm not so sure our efforts aren't needed, though. Anglers may not be responsible for a significant portion of the "harvest, but if we, a huge body of anglers, want to persuade other fisheries to modify their catches (of bunker, say), we'll be better placed to do so if we lead by example, showing what this species means to us by putting them back.

 

Jonny

 

 

 

 

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Jonny,I kinda doubt that what we do as rec anglers has much influence on the behavior of comm anglers,esp the ones who net bunker.I tend to be an optimist(fisherman thing?) but not on that topic.



The virginia legislature needs to act on Omega proteins rape of the bay as well the comm netters w/ the spotter planes that clean up the E coast every spring of all the bunker.Was it NJ that passed a bill last year to stop netters?


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Living in the Chesapeake Bay Region ... up river from the Reedville Menhaden Reduction operation / OMEGA oil ... I can tell you the VA fed era & state politicians OBSTRUCT any conservation efforts made at the local, state or federal level. There's a local Republican Rep who just introduced a bill to get Virginia OUT of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission because of the Menhaden cap.

 

So getting good management is a constant struggle. I agree whole heartedly that the best thing for Striped Bass management is getting a special status (make it a game fish) .... and get the large commercial operations under strict control / regulation.

 

Think about what happen last year this time off the North Carolina Coast. A bloody massacre and WASTING of fish (For Miles!!):mad:

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Jonny,I kinda doubt that what we do as rec anglers has much influence on the behavior of comm anglers,esp the ones who net bunker.I tend to be an optimist(fisherman thing?) but not on that topic.

The virginia legislature needs to act on Omega proteins rape of the bay as well the comm netters w/ the spotter planes that clean up the E coast every spring of all the bunker.Was it NJ that passed a bill last year to stop netters?

 

There's more than one way to exert influence, not all of it directly. I maintain that we would a more powerful presence if we led by example. There are numerous examples where anglers have lobbied successfully for environmental change.

 

Look, I know it's a choice, a freedom, a right; but when I see de-flanked cow bass discarded dockside, as I do every year in RI or CC, I know that the angling fraternity is not on the same page. And in my view this does not help striped bass.

 

J

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Without taking the time to track down this graph and read the report from where it came, what EXACTLY does "Recreational catch" mean, how is it being represented in this graph, and how was it defined in the report?? For example, what do the variables A1 , b1, represent.

 

Also, how does the recreational harvest moratorium play into this graph? Lifted around 1995, no? Seems to me no one seemed to mention this little piece of information.

 

Listen folks, numbers are like people, if you torture them long enough, they'll tell you anything.

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M.S.

 

This is what Ag1 wrote on the other website when he posted this graph:

 

"I just discovered a new NOAA fisheries Database tool that provides access to lots of stats on recreational catch and activity.

 

http://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/st1/recr...ies/index.html

 

It provides tables and graphs by species, region, state, year, etc. I found it fairly easy to use. The attached graph is a quick look at total stripers caught (released + harvested) in Mass. for 1981-2011. Looking at it, I can't understand how the fisheries managers can say that everything is just fine with the stocks.

 

The number of anglers and related trips have also been declining sine 2008, but that alone does not account for the catch rate drop.

 

So, if you have some time on your hands and are curious, play around with it."

 

There has been a revision of NOAA's methodology on reporting recreational catch statistics in respose to scientific criticism fvrom the National Research Council and this new database incorporates thse changes.

 

There is a video in which the re-estimation process is explained:

 

http://www.countmyfish.noaa.gov/mrip_tv/MRIPTV-Re-Estimate/estimate.html

 

And further information here:

 

http://www.countmyfish.noaa.gov/index.html

 

I think you are going to have to search hard to find any rec. angler in MA that would seriously argue with that graph. It is doubly interesting in that it represents, unless Ag1 botched the search, the OFFICIAL NOAA stats. So, at least as a starting point in discussing the issue with the managers, this is the stat they have to accept as best evidence.

 

PMP

 

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