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ProfessorCoco

Trout Jig Outfit

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I'm thinking about putting an outfit together specifically to fish light plastic/marabou jigs for trout. Seems like a technique with huge potential that doesn't get used at all where I'm at. 



 



For all the guys that throw jigs at trout, what rod actions/lengths tend to work best? Should I be looking at 4 1/20-5 1/2' ultralights wearing a 500-size mini reel, or a 6-7 footer with a 1000 size reel? Line will prolly be light braid with a fluoro leader. 


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I occasionally fish jigs but fish a lot of worms with split shot and the principles are very similar.

 

The outfit needs to be sensitive (though that shouldn't be an issue with braid), and it needs to be responsive and crisp enough to lift a jig off the bottom quickly to avoid snags etc.

 

Size depends on where you are fishing. If you are in a creek or an area where you can't wade and have to cast amongst the brush, then a shorter rod will be more manageable. If you can get to open water or have space to cast then I greatly prefer a longer rod. The length will help lift the jig quickly without too much wrist movement and also help keep the line off the water to minimize drag. The length also allows the rod to transition from a thin tip that can load with light weights but still have some beef in the butt.

 

My worm/jig rod is a 7' St. Croix Avid that I extended to 7'6".

 

This thread may help a bit.

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/t/830746/new-trout-rod

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I use to fish just plastic or also attach a salmon egg on the hook as a teaser for the trouts out here in SoCal mountain rivers. But that was about 5 years ago. I currently jig using a jig head with powerbait rolled in the palm of my hand to maybe a 3/8" head/body tapering off to a tail with a length of about 1 1/4-1/2" long.



 



With that said, I use a Stradic 1000FI paired with a Shimano Tescata XL 7ft. saltwater pole. I only use 2lb line but I like the capacity especially when I get snagged on branches and cover along the river. It's a 7 footer because I need the length to cast around low hanging branches or trees from the river's edge. At most, I only get my feet wet since we Californians aren't accustomed to the cold.



 



I know it's a saltwater pole but the fish don't. It has great sensitivity and has become my favorite pole for lakes and rivers. I just change the reel out to a Bradia 2500R when I fish for Stripers and Catfish.



 



If I had to do it over again, I'd probably buy a Saros 1000F instead. At that size, the only difference you'll notice is that the Stradic feels more solid like it can handle a bigger fish. But smoothness is the same.



 



 


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i use a short 4'5" ugly stick.  not the 'best' rod but i really dont fish for trout often enough to buy anything more.  its short cause where i fish there are low trees and limbs to get in your way.  the length helps not to get all tangled up in the brush.  6lb mono. 


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Here in western NC we have a ton of overhanging brush and rhododendron, and most creeks and smaller rivers have a lot of pocket water. Yesterday, I was using a 6 1/2' rod, and I was struggling to put my lure right where I wanted it while avoiding brush behind me. I ended up going with a cheapish 5' micro graphite ultralight with a limber tip and some backbone in the bottom half (lots of potential for 20"+ browns in some places), and mounted a sienna 500 on it. Should be a solid jig/spinner setup, and if catastrophe strikes, I can replace it pretty easily.


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The places I fish are tight with cover but I use a Mitchell 7' rod with 6lb line. If it's tight I use the pitching tech just like in bass fishing & get around & through brush & overhangs pretty good. I don't fish jigs though just spinners & small cb.

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I hear you on the long rods. This is my first short rod in years, and I'm pretty surprised at how well it can throw. Not really a meaningful difference between it and my 6 1/2 footer I've been using, except I find it easier to cast short when I need to. I know the distance gap would be greater with heavy stuff on big water, but that's not really what I got it for. It'll be getting used for spinners a lot, as well.


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I don't do much trout fishing, and when I do usually it's with a fly rod. But, I do like to fish the tiny jigs for Crappie's & Perch. I bought a Quantum Teton 7' rod a couple of years ago, and paired it with a Diawa Samuri 1000 reel & PP 15 lb braid. I'm very pleased with it. For me at least, it's quite sensitive, and I like the longer rod. But, I usually am fishing in places where there is not much over head to interfere with casting. I also have a BPS 8'6" float N fly rod, which is a great rod IMO for tiny jigs, but again, not a rod for tight places. However, I have fished in some tiny streams with it, where casting most anything is impossible, but that extra length gives a lot of reach, and is great for dropping jigs into small holes. :)

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ProfessorCoco View Post

 

 

Here in western NC we have a ton of overhanging brush and rhododendron, and most creeks and smaller rivers have a lot of pocket water. Yesterday, I was using a 6 1/2' rod, and I was struggling to put my lure right where I wanted it while avoiding brush behind me. I ended up going with a cheapish 5' micro graphite ultralight with a limber tip and some backbone in the bottom half (lots of potential for 20"+ browns in some places), and mounted a sienna 500 on it. Should be a solid jig/spinner setup, and if catastrophe strikes, I can replace it pretty easily.

 

You may want to try the power bait mini trout crawfish on a trout magnet head for the large browns. These have worked great for me in red or brown colors. If legal night time is the best time to jig for the biggest browns with the tiny crawfish jigs.   

 

 

 

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Do you find the smaller crawfish imitations to be more effective than, say, a 2-incher? I know from experience that big trout aren't necessarily scared of a big bait.



 



One thing I've considered is a smaller tube jig--not a panfish tube, but a 2 1/2 incher or so. Works for smallies, oughtta work for browns.


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UPDATE: well, it works. Went out yesterday spinner fishing. Biggest of the day was 20" and a good bit of change (measured against the decal on my rod). Drag on the Sienna was buttery smooth. Just wished I had put something stouter than 4 pound mono on it. It's now wearing 10 pound spectra wink.gif I got wet landing that one, so I spent the rest of the day wet wading. It sucked at first, but got better once the numbness set in. I promptly slipped, fell over, and bashed the reel on a rock. Couple of scuffs on the rotor, no mechanical damage whatsoever. I'm declaring this little outfit initiated biggrin.gif


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Glad to hear it worked out for you.



 



The biggest trout coming out of the local mountain streams/river here is only about 14-15". For the size that you caught, we have to shell out quite a bit of cash to fish the stocked lakes.



 



It's great when you do catch one or two. But when you skunk out, between the gas, entrance fee and lunch, it all adds up.


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