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HanoverStriper

Herring counting volunteers - Pembroke

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I recently inquired about volunteering for the North and South Rivers Watershed Association regarding the herring run in Pembroke. I know last year they had volunteers (some members here) who netted and trucked herring above the broken ladder, and this is something I would love to do this year. The ladder has since been repaired, but they are looking for people to help count the herring from April to early June. They would like the counts to take place 3 times daily (morning, mid, evening) in 10 minute increments. I certainly don't have time to head over there 3 times a day, every day, but plan on doing it when I can. If anyone else is interested in volunteering to count herring in Pembroke, please let me know and I can put you in touch with the appropriate person/people. Thanks, Steve

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Does that mean visually inspecting the count or does this involve physically getting into the latter and counting every single herring? im just curious i dont live near pembroke but im sure if they're doing there this must be going on at all herring latters. Yes/No:confused:

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Nice Slim. Got this email from her today as well:

 

We will need help at the South River (Marshfield), First Herring Brook (Scituate), and Third Herring Brook (Norwell/Hanover) in addition to Herring Brook in Pembroke.

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They probably want you to count them entering or passing a point on the ladder, or entering above the ladder, whatever, I did it last year, but there were not many at all where I did it. You also record the water temp, air temp and weather condition if it's the same type of study.


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I haven't gotten the details yet, but I assume it visually inspecting from above. bob_G could answer that better as I believe he counted last year.

 

I didn't count last year outside of my town (Bourne). But, I have been involved with several other folks who act as custodials to their local runs (most Alewives Anonymous). AA recently acquired a small fish counter. But prior to that, their fish counts were done by eye. A volunteer was assigned a location, where he or she stood for a predetermine amount of time, and counted every fish that passed upstream during that time. From there, the numbers were gathered, and some sort of voodoo math formula was applied to determine a 'rough' fish count for the run.

As a few of you know, I spend all my volunteer time at the Bournedale and Pocasset runs. This will be my 25th year. It's both a very rewarding and extremely frustrating and often sad experience. Lately, it's been more on the frustrating, exasperating side. :( All our runs are in a severe state of decline. As a result, the only function people such as myself are doing is, assuring that the few remaining herring which have managed to survived, and return to spawn, have adequate and safe passage to the pond where their lives began.

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I didn't count last year outside of my town (Bourne). But, I have been involved with several other folks who act as custodials to their local runs (most Alewives Anonymous). AA recently acquired a small fish counter. But prior to that, their fish counts were done by eye. A volunteer was assigned a location, where he or she stood for a predetermine amount of time, and counted every fish that passed upstream during that time. From there, the numbers were gathered, and some sort of voodoo math formula was applied to determine a 'rough' fish count for the run.

As a few of you know, I spend all my volunteer time at the Bournedale and Pocasset runs. This will be my 25th year. It's both a very rewarding and extremely frustrating and often sad experience. Lately, it's been more on the frustrating, exasperating side. :( All our runs are in a severe state of decline. As a result, the only function people such as myself are doing is, assuring that the few remaining herring which have managed to survived, and return to spawn, have adequate and safe passage to the pond where their lives began.

 

Thanks for the info bob_G. And thanks for doing what you do for the local runs. I'm looking forward to helping out counting when I can. I grab a coffee right near 3rd Herring Brook on the Hanover / Norwell line every morning, so I'm thinking about doing the counting there.

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Thanks for the info bob_G. And thanks for doing what you do for the local runs. I'm looking forward to helping out counting when I can. I grab a coffee right near 3rd Herring Brook on the Hanover / Norwell line every morning, so I'm thinking about doing the counting there.

 

HS,

 

A very important function often overlooked is a simple spring clean up. A month or so prior to the arrival of the herring, put on your waders and walk the entire run. More than likely, there will be an acumilation of debris from the past winter that is making passage more difficult for the herring than it needs to be. A potato rake and hand or small chain saw is usually all that's needed.

In Bourne, we're fortunate to have the AmeriCorps kids helping us. But even at that, it easily takes 3 fulls days to prepare the run for the arrival of the herring.

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HS,

A very important function often overlooked is a simple spring clean up. A month or so prior to the arrival of the herring, put on your waders and walk the entire run. More than likely, there will be an acumilation of debris from the past winter that is making passage more difficult for the herring than it needs to be. A potato rake and hand or small chain saw is usually all that's needed.

In Bourne, we're fortunate to have the AmeriCorps kids helping us. But even at that, it easily takes 3 fulls days to prepare the run for the arrival of the herring.

 

Yes, I am planning on going down to scope it out in March. Thanks again.

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Steve

 

The NSRWA does the type of clean up Bob mentioned and Sara said she would let me know when they started so ill let you know. I really look forward to this, I plan to bring Mason along with me, I want him to know how important it is.

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Thanks Slim. Yeah, we have been emailing back and forth, and I asked her about cleaning up the run (specifically 3rd herring brook). Told her I would scope it out from the road, through the woods to the North River. She did mention not to remove or disturb large down debris unless it was truly "blocking" the run as it might be a habitat for other wildlife.

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....,

A very important function often overlooked is a simple spring clean up. A month or so prior to the arrival of the herring, put on your waders and walk the entire run. More than likely, there will be an acumilation of debris from the past winter that is making passage more difficult for the herring than it needs to be. A potato rake and hand or small chain saw is usually all that's needed.

.....

 

Bob G.............is there a history of the American Indian cleaning the herring runs? I'm speculating here, but if the Indian did not periodically clean the runs, then over time wouldn't the runs become overgrown with debris and blowdowns thereby preventing the herrings upstream move?

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