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Andrew S.

Some general questions about Long Island fishing

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I've got a job interview coming up in the Hempstead/Hicksville area. Having lived in Connecticut for several years, I'm familiar with the reputation of the east end of Long Island for fishing. I know there's good saltwater fishing to be had for stripers, etc. elsewhere.

 

But I also like freshwater fishing, particularly when I just need a quick fix. Is there any freshwater fishing at all in the western/central Long Island area? I'm not asking for spots, or even bodies of water. I'm just trying to get a feel for how my fishing habits might have to change in the event that I got and took this job.

 

In CT, most of my fishing was fly fishing on foot for stripers and blues, and I love this kind of fishing. But I'm currently in the midwest, and I also like the ease of fishing small streams and ponds/lakes for smallmouth and largemouth, carp, etc.

 

If we end up on Long Island, is the salt pretty much the only game in town? And is public access good? I'd hate to have to drive all the way to Montauk when I just have short time to fish.

 

Thanks for any thing you have that will help form my general impressions!

 

Andrew

 

 

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Access is kind of complicated, depending on where you live. That's because there are state parks, county parks, and parks where local municipalities are in control. State waters are open to anyone (some take reservations, especially the more popular trout streams). County parks will cost more if you're a non-resident. Some town waters are only accessible to town residents. Look for a copy of Angelo Peluso's book, "Fly Fishing Long Island", which will run down all the fresh and saltwater spots and the fish that are available in a nut shell.

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miles and miles of open south shore beach's friend. Montauk is the place but you got great fishing all over it seems to me. fresh water no clue but we have a lot of ocean.:)

 

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Access is kind of complicated, depending on where you live. That's because there are state parks, county parks, and parks where local municipalities are in control. State waters are open to anyone (some take reservations, especially the more popular trout streams). County parks will cost more if you're a non-resident. Some town waters are only accessible to town residents. Look for a copy of Angelo Peluso's book, "Fly Fishing Long Island", which will run down all the fresh and saltwater spots and the fish that are available in a nut shell.

 

I wasn't aware of that book - sounds like what I'm looking for. Thanks!

 

Thanks for the other replies as well.

 

Andrew

 

 

 

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I grew up in the SW corner of Connecticut. Moved to Long Island in '83 just so I could fish (picked up a chart, looked for an area with an inlet giving good access to deep water that wasn't impossibly far from my job in NYC, and ended up looking for a place in Babylon) and never regretted the move.

 

I'm primarily a deep-water boat fisherman, but whether you're fishing fresh or salt water, the public access on Long Island is so much better than what you find in Fairfield County that it's like living in another world. Whether you want to engage in catch-and-release fly fishing for heritage-strain native brook trout (Carman's River in Southhaven County Park), night (or day) surf fishing for stripers (many parks, from one end of Long Island to the other, owned by state, county and local governments (there are some local access issues, but nothing near what you face in Connectucut), flats-style fly fishing for striped bass (you'll have to find those on your own, but they're there) or boat fishing from the bays to blue water, Long Island angling is so far superior to what I experienced when I lived in Connecticut, that I can easily advise you to make the move.

 

On the other hand, I do miss my rocks. A lot of Long Island has a shortage of those. So I still go back to fish with my friends in Connecticut from time to time, to toss lures at the stones where I first learned to fish at about the same time that the Russians launched Sputnik...

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the nice part about living on long island is , you can drive from the north shore to the south shore in about 25 minutes and find plenty of spots to fish in between . i`m lucky enough to live walking distance from the beach on the north shore where there are plenty of spots to fish for stripers , blues , fluke , porgies , etc . the other nice part is within a 10 minute drive from the same area i can hit up some largemouth , trout , bluegills and even some walleye . if you do take the job on the island i don`t think you`ll be disappointed with the fishing situation here . if you go to mapquest or google earth you can scroll around a map of long island and see just how many ponds/lakes there are from where your going to move to .


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I was practically raised fishing the western sound and it has taken me 24 years to begin fishing long islands beautiful fresh waters. Me and  my buddies have been doing great winter fishing at Hempstead Lake, its easy to get to and offers some nice scenery. Also in Queens there are some nice lakes to fish, my first freshwater experience was at Oakland lake right off northern blvd just west of the cross island. hope this helps.



 


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Job in Hicksville/Hempstead look for a house in Oyster Bay to your north, Long Island Sound or Seaford/ Massapequa, Great South Bay/ Ocean and you'll be able

to bike to productive areas to fish. Good advice above for sure.

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I grew up biking distance to both great L.I. Sound waters... and/ or great Largemouth lakes! That's what created Roguewave! :shaky:

 

 

Big strong fish/ Saltwater won out quickly-- & I haven't fished Freshwater now in 20+ years or so. Just too many great saltwater opportunities here in NYC & on L.I. to bother with that smaller / easy - type "Bass"... :)

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