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Apollo's Boss

Speaking of trout reels and lines...

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On my boat when storage is not an issue I bring an 8 with int., a nine floater, and and a 10 shooting head sink tip.  If I'm going on someone else's boat or from shore I figure out a go to and only bring one rod.  When Bonefishing I keep a spare leader in my pocket, a spare reel in my pack loaded with a redundant line.  Steelhead, one rod on the stream, a spare line in the pack and at least two rods in the vehicle.  Trout fishing I bring at least 2 rods.  I have a 3,4,5, and a 6.  I match the rod to the water type and conditions and have one next best match along as a backup.  For instance, if I'm on an early season trout trip the water will likely be high but there's a chance of a grannom hatch I fish the 5 as a nymph /streamer rig and keep the 4 setup for dries. 



 



You can't have too many toys and when you get to where you're going you want to have the tools needed to at least get you into the game.


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Appolo,

Intregued as to why you ask?

Mike

 

Mike, prior to last summer my only experience trout fishing was for stockies in a small lake, casting and stripping streamers and wets. Last summer I became more interested in trout fishing and began to fish some rivers and learning how to fish dries and nymphs and that got me thinking about different lines/tapers etc. For the foreseeable future, the only rod I'll have is a 5wt., so I'm wondering about whether different lines for different applications is something that I need to consider. I'm strictly talking about floating lines with different tapers or WF vs. DT.

 

 

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Hey Apollo's Boss-



I'd be thinking more about staying with a WF on a 5 but be more concerned with head type.  In a biggish river where you want to nymph and swing with a little dry thrown in a general WF is fine.  If you are doing small streams primarily presentation becomes more of an issue and a trout taper or delicate taper becomes more important.  I went from an old Cort 444 to a Sci Ang GPX last year on my #4.  I need to get a less agressive tape this year the GPX was too much.  I want something that will be more delicate on the splash.  I can adjust the cast to be more gentle by stopping the forward stroke a little sooner but it isn't what I'm looking for.  Unfortunately, fly lines a kind of pricey to play this game with. 


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Hey Apollo's Boss-

I'd be thinking more about staying with a WF on a 5 but be more concerned with head type.  In a biggish river where you want to nymph and swing with a little dry thrown in a general WF is fine.  If you are doing small streams primarily presentation becomes more of an issue and a trout taper or delicate taper becomes more important.  I went from an old Cort 444 to a Sci Ang GPX last year on my #4.  I need to get a less agressive tape this year the GPX was too much.  I want something that will be more delicate on the splash.  I can adjust the cast to be more gentle by stopping the forward stroke a little sooner but it isn't what I'm looking for.  Unfortunately, fly lines a kind of pricey to play this game with. 

 

Trout fishing I always fish floating. Muskie or pike, I always have one floating rig and one intermediate rig.

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I haven't used anything other than a DT 5 weight floating line for trout in years. That is on larger rivers like the Housatonic all the way down to streams so small you can jump across them, and for everything from nymphs to wets to streamers to dries from sz 8-28.

 

:-)

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For ponds, I use a floating line when the fish are rising. But most of the time I use the Rio streamer tip, a floating line with a 10' clear intermediate tip. If the water is shallow I use Rio midge tip (3' clear intermediate tip) so I won't get hung up on the bottom and ruin the hook point. So 2 reels rigged on 2 rods, a 3wt an 4wt, with a floater on the spare spool, for all three I use all 5wt lines.

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Apollo,

 

I get your drift now. Ok 5wt is a nice wt for a river rod. You can probably under cook it by one line wt and by over one to. I use DT lines myself for river fishing for dries and nymphs but a std WF is fine to. The only time I would look at an Intermediate line is if i was fishing down stream and across with a team of wet flies and I was trying to stop my flies skating over the surface. Otherwise for trout your floating line is your key tool. For depth fish upstream and use longer leader and nymphs with a bit of wire in them or a gold bead head.In fact to be honest I do very little river fishing in a downstream mode. You can get so much closer to fish if you creep up behind them. When I was a bit younger my eyes were good enough to see underwater takes and spot the leader or fly line hesitate these days I have had to bow down and use a small indicator which does bother me. Its good to fish a team of wets upstream to. You soon get used to gathering your line in as the current brings it back towards you. For short casts you can often get away with just raising your rod tip.

 

Have loads of fun. PS. The Pheasant Tail nymph weighted and unweighted is a real sucess story on most rivers. If I was only allowed one fly ever again this would be it.

 

Mike

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I generally don''t carry two different lines for any given rod, except in saltwater (floating and intermediate). For trout fishing, I'm more likely to have two rods on hand and either a second spool or a second reel with line to match the second rod. Most of the time though, I'd only be using one rod a particular day. You can go nuts worrying over these things, but on a trout stream you have bigger fish to fry than what kind of line/taper you are using. Find a line that matches well with the rod you're using and stick with that. Once you have the line that you personally like, you will find that the leader is more important than having any specific line weight or taper.

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Mark it down in big red letters, Mike. We agree on something else! :-)

Steve

 

Steve,

 

You have a memory like a knotted elephants truck. Ok I am fishing the Cape from 31st May for two weeks. How about meeting up and we can have a war of floating lines and a team of two verses an I line with one sad Deceiver badly knotted onto the distal end.:D

 

See you there.

 

Mike

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