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Practice Rountines

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As a new caster working a great deal on trying to improve for next spring I'm curious about the practice rountines some of you may have. I have taken a lesson recently and I have to work on a few things but I'm not sure about how to practice oddly enough. Any advice?

 

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It's just like any other sport or any othr thing that you do. If you want to be good at it you need to Practice.

 

If weather & Time allows it get out there as much as you can. I can't think of the guys name off hand but I saw him cast the length of the fly line with no false casting.

 

He told me he would put in at least 20-30 minutes a day practicing. ( Tiger Woods didn't get to what he is today by playing golf once a week!! )

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Practice abrupt and early stops, the Drift (which lengthens following forward cast. Worth doing a search and thorough learning because often the drift is the most effective way to improve fly casting) and late and fast haul to forward cast. Concentrate to achieve very good back cast which is a key to good forward cast.

 

Do back cast as slow as possible so that line still straightens but fast enough the fly does not hit ground of water behind. Stop rod just after passing vertical which results narrow line loop. Actually too fast back cast can cause line loop overshoot and cause fly path turning down.

 

While line loop unrolls do the drift. Push rod tip backwards and raise rod hand. Eventually rod can reach almost horizontal angle and rod hand raise above your head and this is called "extended drift". Haul to back cast is optional because with short head fly lines or when casting to head wind back cast usually does not require additional line acceleration so there is time to concentrate to good back cast. While back cast also bring line hand close to rod butt, arm across chest..

 

Aim forward cast above horizon and smoothly accelerating both hands in an arch, first forward then downward, almost like hitting with an axe but rod hand wrist is loose so that rod goes forward reel end first without much angle change. When rod hand passes vertical hands start to separate. Now SQUEEZE rod hand and hit rod tip forward pushing hand forward and slightly up almost straight like hitting a wall with a hammer. Line hand path continues accelerating down and back and it is like you try to throw a coin just six inches in to the ground behind you where you release line. Completely forcefully straightening arms strain joints and ligaments so leaving some bend is good idea.

 

In this video Tim Rajeff shows exaggerated distance casting style but from 50 seconds forward it has all the elements a very efficient long distance salt water cast has which sometimes might be needed.

 

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Don't practice on your lawn as it will eat up your flyline and grass does'nt act or move like water.



You don't have to go out w/ the intent of catching,focus on the casting and you'll be surprised along the way.I took up overhead two hand this past year and I felt like a total beginner all over again and focused on getting the mechanics down to the point of being a muscle memory/reflexive response.It does'nt have to be a destination fishery to practice,the creek down the road is good enough.



 


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Don't practice on your lawn as it will eat up your flyline and grass does'nt act or move like water.

 

 

Wet grass, like early morning or after a rain, is less harsh, and so is snow! Neither act like water, though. And when possible I use an old crappy fly line that now has practice as it's designated duty. Of course, acquiring another fly line for each size you use is something that comes with time. You have to fish those lines quite a while to get them that bad.

 

Always use a leader! You don't want to find out why.

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Don't practice on your lawn as it will eat up your flyline and grass does'nt act or move like water.

 

 

Not true. Like many purported "facts" this does not stand up to the light of day, at least not in my experience. I've practiced on grass (hard to get to water to practice - if I can get to water, I'm not practicing, I'm FISHING!!!) for the past 10 years. Plus most of my fishing is sight fishing from a skiff or center console offshore boat without any line in the water before I start a cast. Every year from March (getting ready for tarpon season) to October when it finally becomes too cold for my tropical lines to be stretched out. I use the same lines I practice for that I fish with. Anywhere from an hour to two hours a day, five to seven days a week, weather permitting. Literally anywhere from two to four thousand casts a week, for somewhere around 120,000 casts per year, all on the grass. Cortland. Rio. Sci Anglers. Monic. Not a single line has ever been eaten up. I still have some lines from ten years ago that I still use for fishing and none seem the worse for the wear on grass.

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Granted it's been 40 some years since I first learned but I distinctly remember my cortland peach colored line taking on a green hue from the grass where I practiced.I can't imagine that as being OK for the line,although I didn't know any better at the time.



Been out fishing F1?Have'nt been around for a mintue or two.


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S&S, my lines have gotten green at the tip where it seems to drag over the grass the most, however, that could simply be an issue of coloration. I have never been able to find any evidence of physical damage from grass on my lines. I've heard the phrases that grass "eats up fly lines" or "tears up fly lines," I have not seen any type of damage that could even be discerned at all. Certainly the same lines I practice with on grass seem to cast just fine when fish are the target instead of hoops on the grass...

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I had a Rio line crack up and down the first 40 feet or so (the entire head basically), and that line was only cast in saltwater and on my grass. Since I don't treat my lawn with anything, it was either caused by the grass or by being a defective line. I'll never know which.

 

That was a coldwater line, but I cast a Rio Tropical floater on the same grass all summer long without any adverse effects. Tropical lines tend to have a harder coating and have been more durable for me.

 

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What any body has as "lawn" or "grass" varies greatly w/ what part of the country one lives in and your maintenance program.A lush bluegrass or fescue is certainly different than a st augustine,buffalo grass or the weeds some call "lawn".And someone who cuts their lawn @ 2" in height(unless they're growing creeping red fescue for a putting green) is gonna have bare spots and lots of coarse weeds that would beat up on a line more'n a soft grass blade.I grew up w/ dogs and chickens so there were always a few bare spots.Still got the chickens...and even less lawn.


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Don't practice on grass??? That's one of the silliest things I have heard on here. The goal of practice is to first learn the basic mechanics and then eventually progress to a point where that rod feels like and extension of your arm and you can make long cast in reasonable winds. So you can cast to the point where making a real cast is almost involutary - it's just natural or instinctual. The only way you can get that way is make a lot of freaking casts! who cares where, if you can't make it to the water and have to practice on grass, in a pool or like I do on my roof deck in NYC. Do it without excuses like the anti grass guy. If you tear a line up - so what! buy a new one, you will have earned it...

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Thanks for the advice. I know I need to practice. what I'm interested in is a practice routine...if any of you Actually have one besides just simply casting. The one response from Formula 1 was

Very daunting. Between work and a young family I cannot commit to casting one to two hours

A day for five to seen days a week. Maybe a three day routine? I'm simply curious if

Anyone follows a routine similar to that of a workout plan or if anyone has

Every come across a book or video that offers one...thanks guys!

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I don't have a ton of structure to practicing in terms of how often. But like any activity, structured practice can be helpful (as you already know given your questions!). So, when I practice, I typically have a particular technique or fix that I want to focus on. Maybe I'm in a phase of fascination with roll casts, or I'm troubleshooting the timing of my double-haul. Maybe I got into a conversation with someone about the effect of rod length or action on casts. These will be the primary focus of my practice. However, it can be good to break down your practice into time blocks where you only do one type of cast. I find that 20-30 minutes is an optimal amount of time to do one type of cast (for myself, others may learn differently). This is about the most I can discipline my attention span, but is also a nice balance of long enough to improve muscle memory and right about the point my body is tired of doing the same repetitive motion (funny how I can do this for hours if I'm fishing--of course, there's far less casts per minute). Then I switch to another type of cast. So maybe what you should do is come up with different tasks or types of casts and do each for 20 minutes straight, then repeat if you have time and feel like it. Like a circuit-training exercise. Do something like:

 

Single handed (line pinched by index at rod grip) 20' loop control (focus on narrowing your loop and false casting without laydown)

 

SH 30' loop control

 

SH 15' accuracy

 

SH 30' accuracy

 

SH 30' out the tip + shooting 10-20'

 

Two-handed (line hand + rod hand) single back haul

 

Roll cast 25'

 

Cast over opposite shoulder (pick a distance)

 

Belgian Cast (pick distance)

 

 

.....and on and on...these are just examples. Maybe if that's too boring, do themes, like combine accuracy tasks for 3 distances and repeat that within the 20 minute block.

 

I don't know what will work for you, but you have to play games like this with your psyche to keep it interesting but still disciplined.

 

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