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sand blister

Basement Framing question.

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Looking to finish a space in the basement which is about 10x3. I want to turn into a closet. My question is if I need to use treated wood all the way around or just the bottom plate? Should I insulate the walls with styrofoam? Also, I have a french drain around the basement. Should I still nail the bottom plate to the concrete?

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If you use wood then only the bottom plate needs to be treated, and nailed to the floor.

 

But why not use metal studs instead? Faster to install, won't warp, burn, rust, or attract bugs.

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Glue 2" Styrofoam to the foundation walls, build your stud walls in front of that. If you are concerned about the French drain, just glue the bottom plate down with polyurethane construction adhesive (PL Premium).

 

:v:

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leave a space for some air to circulate, the last thing you want is for something to get wet or condensate and sit there in its own filth and dampness growing moldy and gross and providing sustenance for all kinds of creepycrawlies. i framed my baseplate away from the foundation and left the french drain clear. you can kind of see it in the below picture. tapcon screws into the concrete every other stud bay. if the screws didnt bite i just jammed an exterior nail into the hole with some glue. the walls arent going anywhere. i insulated with r13 between studs and only used the hard styrafoam up in the joist bays by the sill plate.

 

450

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I think you'll find you want to leave a gap, unless you don't mind a wavy wall. Also, don't neglect the fire blocking.

 

2" blue styro bonded to the foundation with the seams taped, has an effective zero perm rating thus providing a moisture barrier and insulation = no condensation. More often than not, you will end up with a gap anyway as a result of getting the walls plumb and level. All that leaving intentional air gaps does is derate your insulation by allowing air to wash over it (convective heat exchange).

 

Google: building science corp they're out of UMASS and have tons of info with real science behind it.

 

:v:

 

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I think you'll find you want to leave a gap, unless you don't mind a wavy wall. Also, don't neglect the fire blocking.

 

2" blue styro bonded to the foundation with the seams taped, has an effective zero perm rating thus providing a moisture barrier and insulation = no condensation. More often than not, you will end up with a gap anyway as a result of getting the walls plumb and level. All that leaving intentional air gaps does is derate your insulation by allowing air to wash over it (convective heat exchange).

 

Google: building science corp they're out of UMASS and have tons of info with real science behind it.

 

:v:

do remember it is basement

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Quote:

Originally Posted by NickinMass View Post

 

I think you'll find you want to leave a gap, unless you don't mind a wavy wall. Also, don't neglect the fire blocking.

 

Fire blocking in the ceiling.

 

 

 

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