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Effen Gingersnaps!

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I'm going to make sauerbraten this week and all of the best looking recipes (including the one posted here) call for gingersnaps. Seriously? Do they really make that much of a difference?

 

Donna's on a no-gluten diet, so this isn't an option. I may be able to find gluten free ginger snaps and we'll see if they do the trick.

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Ginger snaps MOST CERTAINLY make a difference in in the sauerbraten gravy, and pretty much no substitute for them (See "Grandma Beyersdorfer's Sauerbraten recipe in the recipe forum.)

 

Best I can suggest for you is to use some powdered ginger and then some type of gluten free thickener (corn starch, potato starch, rice flour?) for the gravy, as the function of the ginger snaps is to add the ginger flavor and also act as a thickener. For some reason, I don't think that fresh grated ginger would give the same flavor as powdered for use in something like this.

 

Funny this came up, as I plan on making sauerbraten for my birthday in about 2 weeks and am already scoping out sales for chuck eye roasts and bottom round roasts, as come about 10 days, it will be time to put it in the marinade since it takes 3-4-5 days to "cure"............

 

 

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Ginger snaps MOST CERTAINLY make a difference in in the sauerbraten gravy, and pretty much no substitute for them (See "Grandma Beyersdorfer's Sauerbraten recipe in the recipe forum.)

 

 

That's the recipe I was looking at here. I did find non-ginger snal recipes on the net, but have seen in many places where folks make the smae "you have to use them" claims.

 

I just got back from the store and bought a box of gluten free snaps. We'll see how they work.

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Best you ever had, or best you ever had while sitting on an inflatable doughnut??

 

I'm not a sweet freak (a gallon of ice cream or a box of cookies lasts a long time) , but I like certain things.

Ginger snaps are one of them.

This won't help with the gluten thing, but...

I was hunting with a bunch of guys last weekend. One of them brought down a tin of ginger snaps.

OMG!

These things were the best I've ever had! Nyakers, Swedish Ginger Snaps.

Very thin and gingery.... excellent. I was thinking that they would make a good sauerbraten.

 

As to gluten...

My daughter has gone gluten free for over a year now. She's a pretty fair cooker-person (actually better than that... she's quite good and has some training, she's also a wine broker and her tasting notes are quoted all over the place) Her solutions to gluten free are quite amazing...ranging from "you'd never know the difference" to lots or recipes that are either adapted to include gluten free products or embrace gluten free ingredients. She's a big fan of nut "flours". Peanut or Hazelnut with some fresh ginger would probably be pretty good in sauerbraten.

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PS:

I always use a blade roast for sauerbraten, or a venison front shoulder.

The collagen and gelatinous goodness from the bone and connective tissue add to the texture and flavor of the gravy.

Tomato paste when you're browning the meat (flavor...thickening...acidity)

(shanks would be good, I've got a bunch of them...hmmm...now you got me thinking)

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PS:

I always use a blade roast for sauerbraten, or a venison front shoulder.

 

 

Am making one next weekend (birthday tradition), and have been wavering back and forth between bottom round like Passiton used (as have I in the past) and a shoulder chuck roast. As was said, the chuck has more fat and connective tissue, whereas bottom round, while a good braising roast because of it's relative toughness, is fairly lean.

 

Since seeing the above (although the venison isn't an option), and the fact that Hannaford's has shoulder roast on sale for $2.49/lb starting Sunday, I guess it is gonna be the shoulder roast. :th: America's Test Kitchen is of the opinion that a chuck eye roast is the best cut for pot roast, with the bottom round a second, though inferior choice. Don't think what is on sale is chuck eye, though, and just a standard shoulder roast.

 

Bottom Round:

 

[img=

 

The following are shown as steaks, but gives you the idea of a cross section of a roast from each cut:

 

Chuck Eye:

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2793087/width/458/height/258]

 

Blade:

 

[img=

 

Basic shoulder roast:

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2793096/width/200/height/139]

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Best you ever had, or best you ever had while sitting on an inflatable doughnut??

 

It would have tasted great standing on broken glass.

 

 

 

Am making one next weekend (birthday tradition), and have been wavering back and forth between bottom round like Passiton used (as have I in the past) and a shoulder chuck roast. As was said, the chuck has more fat and connective tissue, whereas bottom round, while a good braising roast because of it's relative toughness, is fairly lean.

Since seeing the above (although the venison isn't an option), and the fact that Hannaford's has shoulder roast on sale for $2.49/lb starting Sunday, I guess it is gonna be the shoulder roast. :th: America's Test Kitchen is of the opinion that a chuck eye roast is the best cut for pot roast, with the bottom round a second, though inferior choice. Don't think what is on sale is chuck eye, though, and just a standard shoulder roast.

Bottom Round:

[img=

The following are shown as steaks, but gives you the idea of a cross section of a roast from each cut:

Chuck Eye:

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2793087/width/458/height/258]

Blade:

[img=

Basic shoulder roast:

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2793096/width/200/height/139]

 

The bottom round worked well, but I have a few chuck roasts in thr freezer. The one I cooked last time came out tough and stringy, so I may try it as a saurbraten this time.

 

 

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I'm not a sweet freak (a gallon of ice cream or a box of cookies lasts a long time) , but I like certain things.

Ginger snaps are one of them.

This won't help with the gluten thing, but...

I was hunting with a bunch of guys last weekend. One of them brought down a tin of ginger snaps.

OMG!

These things were the best I've ever had! Nyakers, Swedish Ginger Snaps.

Very thin and gingery.... excellent. I was thinking that they would make a good sauerbraten.

As to gluten...

My daughter has gone gluten free for over a year now. She's a pretty fair cooker-person (actually better than that... she's quite good and has some training, she's also a wine broker and her tasting notes are quoted all over the place) Her solutions to gluten free are quite amazing...ranging from "you'd never know the difference" to lots or recipes that are either adapted to include gluten free products or embrace gluten free ingredients. She's a big fan of nut "flours". Peanut or Hazelnut with some fresh ginger would probably be pretty good in sauerbraten.

 

Thank you. The gluten free snaps were very good, but cost $5 by themselves. Pricey gravy!

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Fresh ginger note:

Buy it whole at an Asian Market (fresher...better flavor...cheaper), freeze it whole...skin on, grate it frozen.

Works fine for most recipes.

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