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Why U.S. should cheer for Gov. Scott Walker (R) WI

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Some good things might get swept under the fog of political war in a presidential election year.

Here is a story of success that needs to be spread and understood.

 

FYI

 

Column: Why U.S. should cheer for Scott Walker

By Nick Schulz

 

 

The claim that "this presidential election is the most important election ever" is an enduring political cliché, and it's almost always wrong. Consider this year. It's likely the 2012 race for the White House won't even be the most important contest of this year, much less of all time.

 

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is currently the target of a recall effort spearheaded by national public employee unions. If his opponents get enough signatures by Jan. 17, Wisconsin will hold a gubernatorial election this summer. The outcome is crucial to the future of the country.

 

Wisconsin has emerged as a central battleground in the fight over the outsized political role played by, and the enormous privileges enjoyed by, public employee unions. The collective bargaining entitlement enables public sector workers to extract excessive compensation, benefits, and pension packages at the expense of taxpayers.

 

In March, Walker signed what is now nationally famous legislation that reformed public employee collective bargaining. The bill was crucial to putting Wisconsin on a sustainable fiscal path. Public employee unions fought bitterly, albeit unsuccessfully, to block Walker's reforms. Now they are trying to recall him.

 

Guess what? It's working

 

They face a tough fight, however. While the clash over collective bargaining garnered national attention, Walker has additional accomplishments to highlight. The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which opposed Walker's collective bargaining reforms, recently noted, "The governor did balance the budget … he did reduce the structural deficit significantly; he did put a lid on property tax increases; he did give schools and municipalities more control over their budgets than they've had in years."

 

What's more, the reforms pushed by Walker are themselves already having a beneficial effect. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was Walker's opponent in the 2010 election and later attacked his proposals to reform collective bargaining. But with the reforms on the books, Barrett used some of the bill's provisions to help reduce the city's health care bill, saying that the alternative was to cut 300 to 400 city jobs.

 

Here's why the stakes in Wisconsin are so high. Public employee unions understand that the legitimacy of collective bargaining privileges is now in question, as cash-strapped states struggle under the burden of a costly public sector. If they can knock off Walker, they send a powerful signal to other reform-oriented governors not to target collective bargaining.

 

Interestingly, many labor-friendly figures have long understood that collective bargaining rights for public employees are illegitimate. "All Government employees should realize that the process of collective bargaining, as usually understood, cannot be transplanted into the public service," a pro-labor Franklin D. Roosevelt said in 1937. "It has its distinct and insurmountable limitations when applied to public personnel management."

 

Electing your own boss

 

As political scientist Daniel DiSalvo notes in a recent issue of National Affairs, "public-sector unions have significant advantages over traditional unions. For one thing, using the political process, they can exert far greater influence over their members' employers — that is, government — than private-sector unions can. Through their extensive political activity, these government-workers' unions help elect the very politicians who will act as 'management' in their contract negotiations — in effect handpicking those who will sit across the bargaining table from them … Such power led Victor Gotbaum, the leader of District Council 37 of the AFSCME in New York City, to brag in 1975: 'We have the ability, in a sense, to elect our own boss.' "

 

Collective bargaining reform is also needed to enable genuine education reform. The collective bargaining privilege gives teacher unions political power that is used to block reform efforts and shield K-12 education from entrepreneurial disruptions that threaten established ways of doing things.

 

In a recent discussion, Walker told me that "collective bargaining in the public sector is not a right; it's an expensive entitlement." The struggle to rein in and reform expensive entitlements will define American politics for the next generation. A key front line is in Wisconsin.

 

Walker's Way seems to be the right way. Even his enemies are admitting that his vision worked.

 

 

 

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, which opposed Walker's collective bargaining reforms, recently noted, "The governor did balance the budget … he did reduce the structural deficit significantly; he did put a lid on property tax increases; he did give schools and municipalities more control over their budgets than they've had in years."

 

What's more, the reforms pushed by Walker are themselves already having a beneficial effect. Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett was Walker's opponent in the 2010 election and later attacked his proposals to reform collective bargaining. But with the reforms on the books, Barrett used some of the bill's provisions to help reduce the city's health care bill, saying that the alternative was to cut 300 to 400 city jobs.

 

 

What say you.

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I believe the recall effort just hit a little road bump. A judge has ruled that the names/signatures need to be verified.

Apparently there was no real "Bugs Bunny" like one of the signatures on the petition.

 

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I believe that the longer this process is delayed, the more Walker will come out well. Right after all the bruhaha, his stock was very low because people don't like all the conflict and the union thugs were getting all the press. Now that things have calmed down, the benefits and Walker's efforts are beginning to show fruit. And his popularity is climbing.

 

We already know the Dems will try and fudge the petition wtih phony names, the signing dead, acorn tactics, multiple phony signatures, etc. So it will take a while to unscramble the petition signatures and that time will benefit Walker. Good job, Gov.:)

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 Over 35,000 private sector and nearly 9,500 public sector jobs lost in the past 5 months in Wisconsin.  In that same time frame, the U.S. as a whole created 420,000 net jobs.  While the U.S. job situation is far from robust it is at least going in the right direction.  Wisconsin, not so much.PISS-on-Scott-Walker1.jpg


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I believe the recall effort just hit a little road bump. A judge has ruled that the names/signatures need to be verified.

Apparently there was no real "Bugs Bunny" like one of the signatures on the petition.

 

That and one guy went public in a press story bragging that he had signed petitions 80 times.

 

 

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Electing your own boss

 

As political scientist Daniel DiSalvo notes in a recent issue of National Affairs, "public-sector unions have significant advantages over traditional unions. For one thing, using the political process, they can exert far greater influence over their members' employers — that is, government — than private-sector unions can. Through their extensive political activity, these government-workers' unions help elect the very politicians who will act as 'management' in their contract negotiations — in effect handpicking those who will sit across the bargaining table from them … Such power led Victor Gotbaum, the leader of District Council 37 of the AFSCME in New York City, to brag in 1975: 'We have the ability, in a sense, to elect our own boss.'

 

 

 

That is the part of RJ's piece that I have mentioned here before, and is the problem with public sector unions.

It is fundamentally wrong to be able to negotiate with folks the unions have helped to elect, and expect the public to receive a fair shake.

If you disagree with that, you must be part of the problem, and want to keep your ill gotten gains.

 

I have no problem with private sector unions, negotiating with a management that the workers had no say in hiring.

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This one point should win the argument... but of course the "progressives" ignore it.

 

FDR himself said that public sector unions were a huge bad thing.

 

QED

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Quote:

I have no problem with private sector unions, negotiating with a management that the workers had no say in hiring.



Workers don't hire management.  Thats why they are "workers".  Its not their concern.



 



I am 100 % prounion.  if people want to form a union and negotiate for work so be it.  But the "owner" of the work must have the freedom to wi with his "offering" as he chooses, not as some marxist in Washington DC decides  I am anti government intervention in contracts between private willing participants.  That includes ALL union regulation and legislation.



 


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Little, do you agree with public sector union workers having a say in who their bosses are?

 

Private sector union workers have no say in who the bosses are. That puts adversaries at the negotiating table. public sector union workers have a big stake on who wins elections, hence they are friends at the table.

A much better deal for the workers, not so good for the general tax paying public.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by dena View Post

 

Little, do you agree with public sector union workers having a say in who their bosses are?

 

Private sector union workers have no say in who the bosses are. That puts adversaries at the negotiating table. public sector union workers have a big stake on who wins elections, hence they are friends at the table.

 

A much better deal for the workers, not so good for the general tax paying public.

 

Everyone on earth has a say in who their boss is  ("Ill take the job"  or "I quit"),

 

Almost every public sector unionist holds a job that I believe should be private anyway, so its a super sticky wicket.

 

If laws controlling and legislating any union activity were eliminated, most of those problems would vanish.

 

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Everyone on earth has a say in who their boss is  ("Ill take the job"  or "I quit"),

Almost every public sector unionist holds a job that I believe should be private anyway, so its a super sticky wicket.

If laws controlling and legislating any union activity were eliminated, most of those problems would vanish.

 

What's your thought about private sector unions then, Little?

 

I ask because you and I agree about 99% of the way, and I have trouble with it.

 

A unionization is a private contract made between an employer and his employees, which they should feel free to enter into.

 

On the other hand- once unionization has been achieved, it's next to impossible to reverse and the government has a strong say in the running of unionized businesses through the NLRB.

 

Is your thought, as mine is, that unionization should, in fact, be possible, but that the government should not interfere with what happens before or afterward?

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I agree with the sticky wicket part. And I agree with the part about free association.

 

On the other hand, as a tax payer, I like to keep the city, local, state, and federal governments labor costs to something we can afford.

 

Public labor unions are not affected by market forces like private unions are.

 

So some mechanism is needed to keep the public sector unions in check. In many cases now, the public unions are killing the golden goose, and are too greedy to stop.

 

I am not smart enough to figure out how to do that, and let the workers still have their liberty.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Gmofftarki View Post

 

What's your thought about private sector unions then, Little?

 

I ask because you and I agree about 99% of the way, and I have trouble with it.

 

A unionization is a private contract made between an employer and his employees, which they should feel free to enter into.

 

On the other hand- once unionization has been achieved, it's next to impossible to reverse and the government has a strong say in the running of unionized businesses through the NLRB.

 

Is your thought, as mine is, that unionization should, in fact, be possible, but that the government should not interfere with what happens before or afterward?

 

Yep.

 

If we were not in topsy turvy world, unions would be competing with one another for both employees and gigs. 

 

 

 

 

 

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We need to acknowledge that not a single public union with federal employees has the so called right to collective bargain with the federal government.

 

FDR set the tone and it remains solidly in place.

 

I have worked in companies where weak local management bargained away silly, stupid and expensive items that when emplimented it destroyed the local operation within a couple of years. That was in the private sector with Teamster Employees.

 

Jobs lost, retirement monies embezzeled by the Union Leadership or pissed away in investments in bogus companies promising 15% to 40% in annual returns.

 

The union teachers 300 to 400 would have been let go if Walker didn't stick to his guns.

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