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BigD

rob building 101

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Well its time I wanna start building rods I have a rod wrapping machine/ dryer I just need a list of equipment that I'm going to need I've seen kits but I wanna make sure I get all the right stuff thanks for any help fellas appreciate it. Dave

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Hey Big Dave - Thats an open question. It's like the question I want to buy the best car.

You will get all kinds of ''what is best' answers. It all depends on how deep you want to get into rod building. By deep I mean how much money do you want to spend. Do you want to do fresh water or salt water rods? Do you want to do simple stuff or fancy. I suggest using the search functions on the various rod building sites using specific words like rod dryers, rod lathes, rod equipment. There are tons of info on how guys use their 'best' tools. There are some companies that offer "starter" packages and they may be a good way to get started to see if you want to dive into rod building. One word of warning - it can be addictive.

Put out here more info about what you would like to do and you'll likely get input.

 

Just saw a post "Learn the Craft" post by Billy Vivonna. See you list NJ as your location. You might check the NERBS group out. They seem to have a lot of hands on help. It would be a great way to shorten the learning curve.

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Thanks for the help ed I'm gunna keep it simple plan wraps n all saltwater I just feel like getting into it Idk seems fun.. plus if something were to happen to my stuff I wouldn't have to pay someone to fix my stuff n not have to wait 2 weeks for 3 guides to get fixed

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big d theres a rod building sat in billy40 shop in si ,Lots of demos talks,ideas and good times shared everyone walks away with a full stomach and full brain,give him a shout.

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Big D - I jumped into it recently, here's some stuff to chew on...

 

I wrap all of my rods by hand. For this, I built some rollers constructed out of caster wheels mounted to wooden blocks that I screw into a 10' long piece of 1 x 10 pine. I hold the spool in my hand while I wrap, applying tension with my palm / fingers. I've been happy with this, it's fairly slow going but very precise. Total cost on this if you don't have the materials lying around would be about $20.

 

I made a dryer out of a microwave motor attached to a pvc end cap.

 

Here are the materials you'll absolutely need:

 

masking tape for holding thread down and making arbors for reels seats or grips (1/2" is what ive found most useful)

razor blades

a shotglass and a small flathead screwdriver for mixing finish

denatured alcohol and rags for cleaning up the blank

a sandspike / pvc tube or other method for static testing

hot melt glue for tiptops (you only need the glue, not the gun)

brushes for thread finish

a radio for playing some rodbuilding music

 

 

Here are some things that are nice to have

 

A heat gun (for shrink wrap and for fixing problems in the thread finish)

a stool the appropriate height for your work area that you can sit on while you wrap

some kind of thread packing tool, I use the end of a small wooden spoon or one of those cheap plastic ones they sell at any supplier

a tip-top sizer, make this by drilling holes every 64th of an inch in a piece of 1/4" plywood or similar material

speed bits and/or reamers for reaming cork and eva grips

 

 

You'll want to read up on the different options for epoxy glues / pastes for installing grips and seats, and for thread finish. Personally, i've had good luck with flex-coat rodbuilding glue for seats and aftcoat for thread finish. Pay particular attention to drying times, and remember that air temps will play a big role

 

Also, like with anything else, you will learn on the fly through mistakes, trial-and-error, and common sense as you go. One thing that i've found is that experimenting with new products and techniques on a scrap piece of rod blank can save you some headaches. I have read a lot on SOL and picked up plenty of tips and tricks. The search feature is particularly helpful for rodbuilding topics because the keywords lead you to the right place.

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Marty,

Interesting holding spool in hand.

 

Only two suggestions:

1. Use rigid foam arbors - don't trust tape - especially only 1/2"

2. Don't use hot melt glue meant for glue guns. Hot-melt glue melts at various temps and even the hotest is not hot enough. I did a study using the glue stick that specified the hotest melting point. I think it was 185 degrees. It failed before glue-stick meant for installing tip-tops.

Herb

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1. Use rigid foam arbors - don't trust tape - especially only 1/2"

 

This is good advice, for any kind of rod: once you realize how easy foam arbors are to install -- you epoxy the arbor inside the reel seat, let it cure for a day, and then ream the inside of the arbor to fit your blank -- you'll never go back to any kind of tape. Foam arbors are lighter, more sensitive, and all around better than any kind of tape arbor, and they're also much easy to install. I've never been able to do a drywall tape arbor without making a gooey mess and getting epoxy everywhere. In fact, last year I built a heavy-ish trolling rod, and used a slick butt, and had to use drywall tape arbors for the slick butt, as they don't make foam arbors big enough to put a slick butt over them. Going back to drywall tape arbors was such a messy hassle that I swore that the next time I build a rod like that, I'm going to pour the foam arbors myself, because the extra effort is worth it -- foam arbors are that much better than tape.

 

If you're starting out, just buy a few Flex Coat foam reel seat arbors, and forget about tape. It will be easier, and you'll end up with a better finished rod. Herb is giving you good advice here.

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Herb and Belmo-

 

I am definitely planning to give the fc foam arbors a shot, I've been reading up on them a bit lately but haven't pulled the trigger... I am all for the weight saving aspect of them

 

I just did a fuji skeleton seat that came with the graphite arbors. They are certainly light and easy enough to install

 

I will say that I have total confidence in the bond you can get by getting a lot of epoxy into the gaps between masking tape arbors, and they are very easy to do. The epoxy is heavy though compared to foam.

 

Is it a consensus that the fc foam arbors are strong enough for surf and heavy boat rods?

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Marty,

Foam, or anything else, fails with extreme torquing. The only occasion I can see that happening is with heavy stand-up rods or rods gimbaled into sockets where the reel is of extreme width to create a twisting force (torquing) when the line is on the extreme side of the reel.

Also, the thinner the epoxy film at the interface between the seat and whatever the material is (masking tape, wallboard tape, foam, the blank itself) the stronger. So epoxy filler is only as strong as the interface layer. I have only seen a foam arbor partially fail once on a fly rod - which is only what I build - and I am not certain that the arbor failed or I did not prep the inside of the seat properly with sandpaper.

I had to apply huge torquing to remove the seat that was only slightly loose. It rotated - maybe - 3-5 degrees. The removal-torquing may have fractured the arbor - and not the usage.

 

BTW - my installation of the arbor is totally different than anyone else's. Typically the arbor is installed into the seat and then reamed as per Belmo. I glue and turn cork rings directly on the blank. So the seat has to be exactly concentric to the blank. The only way to do this is to cut the arbor into 4 equal pieces (the seat and arbor are 4 1/16" long). I then ream each arbor piece to the taper of the blank. It is impossible to do this to a one-piece arbor unless you have a reamer that exactly mirrors the blank. By cutting the arbor into smaller pieces you come closer the the exact taper. So I ream each piece separately and fit each piece on the blank until snug. So each piece gets reamed slightly less than the prior. Then each piece is epoxied in place. But only after checking that the wall thickness of each piece is equal - so the hole is EXACTLY in the center of the arbor piece.

 

If the seat is a little loose fitting I spirally wind (spaced widely) either one or two layers of size "D" thread onto the arbor before I install the seat. This also makes sure that the seat will be concentric to the blank.

Then the seat is epoxied onto the arbor. I rotate the blank on a dryer until the epoxy is set so that it does not run out the side of the seat.

Regards,

Herb

 

Herb

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Is it a consensus that the fc foam arbors are strong enough for surf and heavy boat rods?

 

I don't know about a consensus, but I think they're strong enough. I've built heavy boat and heavy surf rods with foam arbors, and have never had an issue with them holding up.

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thanks guys. I will use a foam arbor when I do my next reel seat. If you two guys say it, it must be true :D I also talked to Billy who is a believer in them as well.

 

It's all about trying different things to see what works the best.

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