khoalua31

Best braid line for surf fishing

Rate this topic

26 posts in this topic

 

 

If you truly are a newbie, then the last thing you want is to use braid. Stick with Mono until you get your casting technique down. Birds nests can be expensive to dig out and replace until you get good with it.

 

Start with Big Game in 20# test unless you have your technique down. If you aren't fighting birds nests then maybe take it down to 17# depending upon the weight of your bait.If you're fighting birds nests then bump the line test up to 25# or even 30# until you feel good about your technique. Don't sweat the distance side of the equation until you're able to cast without nesting with the line test your using at the time. It takes some people quite a while to get to a point with their gear and technique before they feel comfortable enough to make the bump up to braid. Best of luck!

 

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess the question is, are you using an eggbeater or overhead reel?

 

If you are using an overhead, then Swimbaiter is spot on.

 

I don't surf fish with eggbeaters and so can't help you there ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why are some so afraid of braid?

on a spinner just load it up with 15-20lb and a shocker.

on a conventional load it up with 40-50lb braid.

get a magnet reel to start and you'll have no problem with overruns.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Braid (which includes all Superlines and extruded braids for the benefit of this discussion) is an unpredictable line from the perspective that not all of these lines act alike, nor do all reels (both baitcasting and spinning reels) react the same way to this type of line.

 

Most people who are starting out with their first experience with braid typically don't buy the best braided line because of the expense and/or because they are reluctant to buy a line they may not like and only use it a few times, find they don't like it and pitch it in the trash, or worse, it nests early in their experience, they get frustrated with it and cut it out and replace it with mono. To prevent this kind of experience most lower end braids need to be wet and repacked on the reel before the angler actually starts fishing. This can be as simple as starting out with short casts which progressively increase until the user is casting their normal distance, or spraying a line conditioner on their line (the KVD line conditioner has worked well for me), or in some cases I've heard of people spraying WD40 or silicone on their lines to accomplish the same thing (not recommended without mfg. feedback in my opinion). These measures insure that the line won't stick to itself or bind with parallel lays causing nests. Better grade braids with the teflon or similar coatings may not need you to do this kind of "prefish" measure unless your reel doesn't have a synchronized level wind (i.e. the level wind guide doesn't follow the the line lays on the spool and may cause line friction between lays on the spool) in which case wetting the line first allows the line to come off on the cast much easier and without line binding. Something else to consider is the difference between the way that baitcast reels handle braids vs. the way that many spinning reels handle it. Suffice to say that most braid mfg.'s will agree that "true" braids work fine on the majority of baitcasting reels while spinning reels may not handle braid nearly as well. Spinning reels will handle one type of braid, normally referred to as an "extruded braid" (another topic entirely) like Fireline Crystal in most cases extremely well, because it's stiffer and which typically doesn't have the visible braided strands which can bind to one another during the cast causing birdsnests. Owners of spinning reels would do well to consider trying this type of line because it typically casts very well, for very long distances and lasts a good long time.

 

Well that's it in a nut shell I guess. When in doubt, contact the mfg.'s of several lines you might be interested in. They all have seemed to be extremely willing to help identify the right line for the application. Hope it has helped some of the anglers out there who have been wanting to try these types of line but have been reluctant to give it a try or who have tried these lines with less than favorable results.

 

Tight Lines.

 

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
any 10 to 20 pound braid will work but I like suffix performance braid or 832 braid.

 

That's what i have been using and it casts and handles very well in the lighter test. It is also one of only a handful of braids that has the strength to land big fish, color washout is a problem as it goes too fast compared to other braids, but nothing terrible. As long as you tighten down the drag so no slippage occurs there should be no trouble with cuts, even with lines this light, i can't even remember the last time i was cut, i know it was years ago though as i forgot to fully tighten it down due to a blitz in front of me.

 

 

 

You hear people wanting distance, distance, distance over, it seems, every other factor these days and it's always "what rod will cast the farthest " but line diameter is more important to achieve the goal. When you consider that every surf fish imaginable was caught with lines in the 17 to 20 pound class for decades before the superlines and braids became available (and these lines had an actual breaking point at ,or very close to said number) it continues to baffle me as to why guys insist on still using lines that have a stated rating of 40, 50 ,or even 65 pounds but really break closer to 55-60 65-70 and 75-80 .

 

Have the fish been on a rigorous workout regime that has increased their strength ten fold as to need lines of this strength? I think not. This past summer i remember a few post that talked about long battles with big fish and the anglers were astonished that they had landed fish and big rays of over 40 pounds with 10 pound braid. It was not surprising to me at all because i have been using the same line, and down here there is an over abundance of big rays and i land them with little trouble.(i hate hooking into them though, i should point out) now If a 10 pound superline or braid can whip a ray in that pound range then, why the 30,40,50 65 .

 

I do not tournament cast or use many tournament casting techniques, but i do throw with power and i have been extremely happy with the distance i get with my setups for years , i have yet to have these lines fail me even powering out cast in excess of 400". I have never been able to hit 500 but that's fine with me , like i said i'm happy. Now, not all lines are created equal, and there is only a few that have proven to me i can trust in the super light class, i have tested some but not all and there are some that are terrible and i won't use them . Now, there is a few misconceptions out there, one is that the light braids and superlines are unmanageable , this is totally inaccurate, the lines that i fish with are extremely manageable with no tangling or knotting up issues, wind knot issues and zero dig in issues.

 

The only reason somebody will have issues with these lines imo is if that person does not have a good enough command or feel for the characteristics of these types of lines as they may have thought or, their spinning reel could be a bad match with poor oscillation or it can be a poorly set up rod, or a combo of both that caused a problem.

 

I however,always recommended someone who is trying these lines for the first time to go a little heavier, until you get a feel for the different characteristics these lines present. If it's a spinner your going to use, Fireline is the one to start out with imo, simply because its handling and manageability are exceptional across all pound tests. Lighter lines give you more than just added distance, they increase your line capacity, have faster sink rates and most importantly give you the ability to offer far better presentations.

 

So in wrapping up, if distance is what you want, take a hard look at your line diameter before deciding that it's the rods fault because if your spooled up with 30,40,50 + you have already handicapped yourself big time.

 

 

Side note: Of course where you fish and other factors play into line selection like structure, reefs, fish targeted etc...so take that into consideration when choosing line types and strength, the above comments are in general terms.

 

Oh, sorry Mark the above is not directed at you at all, i felt a need to just vent about the distance thing and line choices so many use, just because i used 20 pound mono in the past it must mean i need to use a braid or superline that has the same diameter. A big untruth, unfortunately still believed by many.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think people are irrational to worry about line strength, just excessively concerned about mostly exaggerated risks. I think from reading many posts in various SOL forums that the 40-60 pound braid preference arose from a perception that the thicker line was less likely to pack into itself on the spool and easier to handle than the very thin lines. There was also the perception that knot strength in braid alone or joining braid to floro or mono was siginficantly less than rated breaking strength and that the larger lines were easier to knot well. Those perceptions are now "facts" about braid for many people, even good fishermen.

 

I would also speculate that there may once have been some basis in fact with less expensive braids (even power pro) in smaller diameters where slight variances in diameter could significantly weaken the line. Thinner line may also have greater susceptability to cuts and nicks, because a .001 nick is proportionally deeper in a .014 line than in a .035 line. The fact that many braids overtest (SportFishing did a braid test about a year ago I believe) is ignored by these worried fishermen, but those tests also showed that diameter was strongly related to actual breaking strength.

 

And of course we all hope that the next cast could produce the next 50lb bass. Rather than gear up for the fish we will actually see in most situations, we gear up for the fish you dream of seeing.

 

We then build a whole discussion of long distance casting for fixing a problem of our own creation (line diameter) with better reels and rods. At my work, I refer to this as "digging a hole just so we can build a bridge across it."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 300 yard spool of 20 lb test Power Pro that was given to me.

 

I plan to make it my first attempt at using a braid in the surf.

 

I have been using BG for years and it's hard to fix something that isn't broke.

 

Question: Why is braid not used in Distance Casting Tournaments? Or as I've been told? Just curious c2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you've never used braid before i would start with powerpro. its cheap and it has a slight stiffness to it. the 20lb has been shown in amatuer tests to break at more like 35-37 lbs. i use daiwa samauri which is very soft and limp. it also wind knots very easily and breaks if you have a miscast. its also expensive. not a good choice for a first time braid user

cnnashman and midwest textile i agree with you 100%. people use way too thick line. they dont realize the other fact of surf rods which is that most rods are designed for 15-30 lb braid. by putting 50 or 60 lb braid not only are they loosing huge amounts of distance but increasing the chances of rod breakage. i know thats what drag is for but why risk breaking an expensive rod. which is worse, line breakage or broken rod? if you actually catch a fish that requires 50 lb braid on a rod designed for 30 lb test the rod might break and you'd loose the fish anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to point out that the reel is a key part in this equation. I would advise a newbie to use 20# Fireline to minimize issues. It's stiffer than most braids & much easier to detangle - at least for me.

 

Do an advanced search on "wind knots" and "braid" by High Plains Drifter. One of his older posts pretty much laid it all out. Even certain modern spinners have wind knot issues due to line lay & spool shape.

 

Manny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i used the 30 lb 832 and found that it chafes a little quicker around the casting area then other braids. it also seemed a little thicker. overall though i liked it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.