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JG41Piper

HELP! Need some yak advice for beginner

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I have a 13 ft Dagger Cypress kayak. It's not an open sit on boat and has a rear hatch with bungee attachments on the front and rear.  What are the disadvantages to this design vs open cockpit boats? I know beaching the boat is difficult and i have been rolled sideways in the surf years ago in the summer months. Hoping I can use this and equip it with attachments and other accessories.



 



Thanks in advance,



 



John


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Wow! That brings back memories from another time for me. That is the boat I actually started in! way back in like 99....

 

What I did back then was used 2 Tite-Lok rod tubes mounted behind the cock pit. I didn't want to sink a flush mount into it. I tried mounting a transducer in the hull, but if I remember right, back than the Dagger hull was kind of like a minicell foam, it had the trapped air bubbles through out the resin, but was HDPE.

 

I'll see if I can find a picture and get it back up here.

 

The disadvantages are the fact it is a sit in model. You should definitely invest in a set of air bladders to stuff in the hull. They will help fill the extra space and help the kayak stay bouyant should you get swamped or dump. Carry a manual bilge pump at all times and a sponge for dewatering duties. The rear hatch is fairly easy to reach and nice for stowing gear you want to keep dry but kinda hard to use for access to tackle. I kept what I needed between my legs in the cockpit. A set of flush mount rod tubes would be a plus.

 

The advantages to the sit in, during colder weather they are warmer because they block the wind and with a skirt you stay dry and hold the warmth in.

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  One of my yaks is sit-in, they can be tricky in rough/surf conditions, but shine everywhere else. If yours has a rudder thats a big plus. Other Daggers I have paddled all had internal bulkheads which keep them from sinking, as only the cockpit can take on water. On this WS Tsunami a sponge under the seat keeps everything bone dry. Universal skirts are available for all sit-in cockpits. If you add rodholders, mount, or offset them completely out of the paddle stroke. I've seen outriggers fitted to the Scotty rodholder bases for increased stability. Practice self rescue in a pool or elsewhere. Your sit-in will feel tippy at first, but you'll be rolling it on edge , carving turns in short order. A paddle leash allows you to drop the paddle over the non fish side and fight fish without the paddle balancing act.0824111040.jpg


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