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Fishing big jointed plugs

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Im curious who fishes big jointed plugs often (GRS, BM, etc) and when you've had the most success with them.

 

Would also love to know how you carry these in your plug bag?

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I use them quite a lot. They are 3 oz metal lip surface plugs from Mikes Plugs. They are most effective early in the AM, predawn or in dark on a quiet night. They make a great surface wake that brings up the Bass. Big ones. I use them in 5-10ft of water. Love black and white colors. JP

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I picked up an "AH Sea Dragon Swimmer" this spring from Afterhours and it was the longest I've had at 11 and a half inches but only weighed 2 and 3/4oz.

 

When throwing on a thick school of 30 to 32 inch fish, I threw it on to see if I could pull up something bigger from the bottom.

 

20 minutes later I had a pair of 37+s which was nice.

 

The plug itself took such a beating from fish early in the season, I had to get some epoxy and squeeze it into the wire hole of the second section because it was spinning almost freely and I thought it might have affected the plug but the epoxy did the trick and it was right back into the groove again.

 

I also had no major trouble with this plug fouling during casting.

 

I run a pretty heavy rod - St Croix Premier 11'6, 2-6 ounce and this plug had the rod dancing in my fingers on virtually any type of retrieve right down to barely reeling which is when I seemed to have the most hits.

 

I was very impressed and happy I picked it up.

 

This was a high tide plug for me and I fish almost exclusivey at night.

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Sharkey, very interesting. I have a couple of big jointed plugs I want to throw this year. I have a few spots I want to try them but unfortunately carrying the plug to these spots sucks bc other plugs in my bag will have to go to make room for this 1 plug. And these spots are hikes!

 

Thanks for the very informative post!

 

Who else fishes these suckers!

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Sharkey, very interesting. I have a couple of big jointed plugs I want to throw this year. I have a few spots I want to try them but unfortunately carrying the plug to these spots sucks bc other plugs in my bag will have to go to make room for this 1 plug. And these spots are hikes!

 

Thanks for the very informative post!

 

Who else fishes these suckers!

 

Sorry I didn't get to the "how I carry them" question bud.

 

Since I fish in so many different ways, ie., plugs, bait, eels etc., I created something that could carry whatever I might be in the mood to bring with me that night.

 

As you can see by the photo, it's a pretty versitile system and I make a new one every year depending on how my and my 8 year old fishing son's techniques evolve.

 

I've never been a "slave to fashion" so to speak and my buckets are cheap, rugged and carry everything he and I could possibly want to use and yes, the tubes are deep enough to carry the long jointed plugs quite nicely.

 

This winter, my oldest son (8 year old SOL member Special Fred) and I will be working on my 5 gallon bucket and a new 2 gallon bucket for him since he is now big enough to carry his own toys and although he has 2 different and VERY good plug bags, he seems to light up like a christmas tree at the thought of having his own "Sharkey and Sons, SOL approved" bucket draped over his shoulder just like Dad...lol

 

700

 

 

And to save all the questions about what I use the bat for, well, it's just for looks..................................................................dirty ones...:)

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I make my own large jointed swimmers. Some with one joint, others with two and I have made some with three joints that swim like an eel. The latter is what i was looking to achieve.  I use these large swimmers off jetties, and at the bottom of rocky crags where there is plenty of white water. I like these larger plugs because from my experience, they attract the larger bass. One thing i've experimented when making these plugs is to make sure that the size of the sections don't inhibit the action. Now some of the larger eel type swimmers are about 13"s in length, some have a sloped head and some have a flat head like a Conrad. I have also made large jointed danny types, about 12"s that are surface swimmers, and will use these on the rocky shoreline of a spot in RI, where i know fish are, but the water is fairly shallow.



 



How I carry 'em, in the tubes in my homemade bag. smile.gif


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Not a big believer in jointed plugs, most cast lousy and many have too much action, particularly in the rear. A dressed Siwash on the rear end of a one piece lure is preferred.

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i love fishing big jointeds, love the feel of the plug in the rod in the dark. also fishing them slowly on or near surface in a calm boulder field brings savage strikes.

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I have fished a BigFish jointed eel quite a bit with much success over the last 2 seasons. Surprisingly, some of my best nights with it took place on the beach, not in boulders. 5-10 feet of water on a dark calm night with a slow retrieve. There's nothing like feeling the plug slowly pumping through the water right before it gets slammed!

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Not a big believer in jointed plugs, most cast lousy and many have too much action, particularly in the rear. A dressed Siwash on the rear end of a one piece lure is preferred.

 

This has been my thoughts also

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When I see a big plug in the water, ya know what? It doesn't look so big. Larger bass swallow adult bunker and can easily swallow a one lb blue fish. smile.gif


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When I see a big plug in the water, ya know what? It doesn't look so big. Larger bass swallow adult bunker and can easily swallow a one lb blue fish. :)

 

[ATTACHMENT=3845]fixter large.JPG (187k. JPG file)[/ATTACHMENT]

 

I agree. Even though its not a jointed plug this 20' rat wasn't afraid of this 12" fixter on xmas day.

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Not a big believer in jointed plugs, most cast lousy and many have too much action, particularly in the rear. A dressed Siwash on the rear end of a one piece lure is preferred.

 

I don't think people are saying that they catch more fish, just that they enjoy fishing them and have caught some big 'uns with them.

 

Smaller lures catch more volumne, imo, and will catch big ones too. But smaller fish can be weeded out with big lures, in my experience.

 

After you've caught plenty of smaller models, sometimes you only want to target lunkas.;)

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Jointeds are on the list for this year. I have been fishing some large plugs, mostly pikies and some other swimmers. I love feeling the throb of these plugs slowly working their way in.

 

As for carrying them: I traded some of the plug tubes in my bag out with tennis ball cans, the plastic ones. It does mean I have to pick wisely as some plugs have to go to make room. If you have a long walk, and want to try bringing large plugs, maybe try two bags. Buy a cheap one and replace the tubes with tennis ball cans, or try a backpack. Some of my large plugs fit in the can with the top on so they don't shake around. Hope this helps.

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