Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fishweewee

Chevy Volt Rated Third Biggest Product Turd of 2011

Rate this topic

127 posts in this topic

 

LOL! Thanks, my reputation as Volt-Dolt precedes me!

 

So far, not a mainstream car.

(Credit: Martin LaMonica/CNET )

 

If anyone thought the Chevy Volt would "save" General Motors, take a look at the first-year sales figures.

 

The auto giant yesterday reported that it sold 1,139 Chevy Volts in November, bringing its total to date to 6,142. That means, barring a massive purchase by a fleet owner, GM will miss its first-year goal of selling 10,000 electrically driven Volts, a target the company now expects to hit early next year. (Nissan has sold 8,720 all-electric Leafs.)

 

Detractors will no doubt say first-year Volt sales prove that electric vehicles are not ready for prime time and not worth the subsidies buyers receive. To me, it's a sign that EVs are hyped and that GM created an impressive, though arguably over-engineered, car to burnish its green car credentials.

 

Purely from a financial perspective, Volt sales are a tiny fraction of the the 180,000 vehicles GM sold last month. The automaker's economic health is hitched far more firmly to less exotic vehicles that everyday people buy.

 

What's more significant is that sales of small and compact cars, including the Chevy Cruze and Sonic, were up 54 percent compared to a year ago. So instead of only pushing giant SUVs and trucks, it appears GM is learning to make and sell fuel-efficient vehicles. That could come in handy as it tries to meet EPA fuel economy standards.

 

It's not hard to understand why people are gravitating to, say, the Cruze over the Volt. The starting price for the Cruze is under $17,000, while the Volt goes is just under $40,000. The Eco version of the Cruze gets 28 MPG in the city and 42 on the highway. Mileage varies greatly depending on driving style, of course, but the Volt is rated at 93 miles per gallon equivalent for city and 37 for highway.

 

The Volt really offers something an internal combustion car can't do, which is drive entirely on electric power. (Late-night talk show maven and auto enthusiast Jay Leno is said to have never refilled his gas tank). And unlike all-electric cars, there are no real worries about range because its gas engine acts as a generator to charge the batteries. Consumer Reports this week reported that the Volt has the highest customer satisfaction rating of any new car. (That, however, was done before the NHTSA board opened an investigation in Volt battery safety.)

 

But when it comes to making "green cars" accessible to the masses, the Volt's leading-edge design is competing with many other technologies, including traditional hybrids, "mild hybrid" or start-stop technology, and fuel efficiencies in gas and diesel engines. As a result, sales of Volts have gone toward the early technology adopters and are likely to stay that way next year.

 

GM certainly has learned a lot about electrification from the Volt program, which all automakers know is crucial technology for the future. And GM has gotten lots of mileage on the PR front.

 

But unless there's a huge spike in oil prices, don't expect the Volt sales volumes to keep pace with the other vehicles in the GM stable. Maybe the biggest win for GM from the Volt will be getting people into its showrooms to see its less famous, stealth eco-cars.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lol for the 250k we suppoer each of these turds, we coulda bought our selves some ferraris and had fun.

 

Ah.....the Mackinac Center,"study" - a right-wing think-tank, tackling and outing it's biggest enemy, all while being objective! Got to love the unbiased reporting, here!

 

The Mackinac Center is the largest conservative state-level policy think-tank in the nation. The Michigan-based organization promotes market-driven policies on a wide range of issues and espouses limited government principles. The Center's success in influencing Michigan policies has served as a model for other state-level think tanks.

 

2012 Chevy Volt

Including all subsidies, loans, grants, rebates and tax credits, James Hohman of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy claims that each Chevy Volt costs up to $250,000 in taxpayer support.

 

A calculator in the wrong hands is a very dangerous thing. Case in point: Number crunching about the cost of the Chevy Volt by James Hohman, assistant director of fiscal policy at Michigan’s Mackinac Center for Public Policy. Despite having a degree in economics from Northwood University (according to the Mackinac website), Mr. Hohman conveniently neglects any notion of research and development costs being amortized over an entire product cycle. He takes the full amount of all public funding offered to support the Volt’s development, and divides it by the number of Volts sold so far. Hohman thereby declares that the Chevy Volt’s cost to taxpayers is up to $250,000 per vehicle.

 

Hohman’s calculation was first reported on Dec. 21, on Michigan Capitol Confidential, a website published by The Mackinac Center. The Mackinac Center describes itself as having a focus on economics that “draws support from market-oriented libertarians, moderates and conservatives.” The organization's website further declares, “We look forward to the day when the myths and fears of free-market capitalism are dispelled, along with the misplaced faith in a benevolent, omnipotent state.”

Reality Behind Talking Points

 

Mr. Hohman said, “This might be the most government-supported car since the Trabant,” referring to the car produced by the former Communist state of East Germany. But when appearing this Wednesday on the Lou Dobbs syndicated radio program, Mr. Hohman seemed to backtrack on the $250,000-per-Volt figure. First of all, he qualifies the 6,000 sales figure used as the divisor in his calculation. “I’m sure they’re going to sell more as time goes by,” he said. “I understand the people that actually bought them really enjoy them.”

 

Furthermore, he admits that the actual taxpayer expense so far is well below $3 billion. Mr. Hohman's used a tally of pledged government support including state and federal assistance from 18 government deals that included loans, rebates, grants and tax credits. The $3 billion total subsidy figure includes $690.4 million offered by the state of Michigan and $2.3 billion in federal money. “If all $3 billion worth of incentives were tapped, and it’s not likely that they are, but it could range up to $250,000 per Volt,” said Hohman on the Lou Dobbs show. “Again, that’s not likely to happen. But if you just took the federal incentives that were being offered to this project and the incentives to buy so far, it would still be $50,000.” Some of the tax credits and subsidies are offered for periods up to 20 years.

 

In response to the reports, Greg Martin, director of Policy and Washington Communications for GM, wrote, “While much less than the hundreds of billions of dollars that Japanese and Korean auto and battery manufacturers have received over the years, the investments provided by several different Administrations and Congresses to jump-start the country's fledgling battery technology and domestic electric vehicle industries matches the same foresight and innovation leadership that other countries are exhibiting and which America has historically taken pride in."

 

Mr. Hohman replied to GM’s response, stating, “This [federal support] has been passed bi-partisan. Politicians on both sides of the aisle like to put their heads in front of projects that are already moving forward, and politicians on both sides of the aisle have said that electric cars are the wave of the future, and have rolled out billions of dollars.”

Political Hit Job to Garner Headlines

 

Despite all the caveats and backtracking, the figure that will stick is $250,000 per vehicle.

 

John Hayward, a conservative author commentator, writing for HumanEvents.com, said, “I’ve long been fascinated by the sad tale of the Chevy Volt, a heavily subsidized electric car nobody wants. It’s one of the purest, most perfect examples of government attempting to artificially create a marketplace, and failing miserably." Mr. Hayward’s own calculations pegs the “per-unit real cost” at $81,000. In the comments following Mr. Hayward’s post, a visitor to HumanEvent.com called into question the ability of the Volt batteries to function in cold weather. Mr. Hayward responded, “But remember, if it's REALLY cold out, your Volt can be quickly converted into a fiery oven to keep you warm.” Hayward was referring to fires that have occurred in lab tests well after the Chevy Volt is totaled in a rollover crash.

 

Dom Giordano, who as the fill-in host for the Lou Dobbs show interviewed Hohman, said “I’ve renamed this the Solyndra-mobile versus the Chevy Volt.”

 

As we’ve experienced throughout this year, it looks like electric cars will continue to be used as a political football in 2012, with EV critics using fear, uncertainty, doubt—and fuzzy math—to make their arguments.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Volt really offers something an internal combustion car can't do, which is drive entirely on electric power. (Late-night talk show maven and auto enthusiast Jay Leno is said to have never refilled his gas tank). And unlike all-electric cars, there are no real worries about range because its gas engine acts as a generator to charge the batteries. Consumer Reports this week reported that the Volt has the highest customer self-satisfaction rating of any new car. (That, however, was done before the NHTSA board opened an investigation in Volt battery safety.)

 

 

Jay Leno has like 100 cars (he is a collector). He probably drives a gasoline one when the other one is plugged in.

 

I made an edit to the satisfaction rating language to make it more accurate.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay Leno has like 100 cars (he is a collector). He probably drives a gasoline one when the other one is plugged in.

I made an edit to the satisfaction rating language to make it more accurate.

 

 

 

303

Photo via Jay Leno’s Garage

 

Jay Leno is known to have quite the car collection – around 100 in all, not including 90 motorcycles – but until recently, he didn’t own an electric vehicle! But after publicly claiming skepticism about the cleaner cars, the late night host has announced his love for his 2011 Chevrolet Volt. In fact, since December of last year, Leno has used his Volt to drive the 35 mile commute from his home in Burbank to work, racking up around 11,000 miles – all without ever visiting a gas tank!

 

Chevrolet Volt, electric vehicle, Jay Leno, Nissan Leaf, green transportation, energy efficient vehicle

 

When offered the first 2011 Chevy Volt, Leno politely replied “no”- but later was among the first buyers when the electric vehicle went to the consumer market. Since the Volt’s full charge has an electric driving range of around 38 to 48 miles, Leno makes his 35 mile trip to work each day powered only by the electric battery. The Volt is then plugged in upon arrival to the studio lot, giving the car a full charge for the ride home.

 

Leno’s Volt was delivered after purchase with a half tank of gas, which still remains in the vehicle. Impressing the car connoisseur, he bragged about his efficient vehicle to the New York Times, citing its endurance over the Nissan Leaf. Leno plans to use the Volt to make trips to Las Vegas from Burbank. The 280 mile trip would likely be supplemented with traditional fuel.

 

 

Let me get this straight - Jay owns over a hundred cars, yet had the time to log 11,000 miles on his Volt? He must really hate the thing!

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


 



Quote:


GM (GM) was originally so excited about the Volt that the company had announced in January it was speeding up its roll-out by six months. But by November the excitement had fizzled out. Larry Nitz, GM’s executive director for vehicle electrification told Reuters, “It’s naive to think that the world is going to switch tomorrow to EVs [electric vehicles].” Indeed, sales for the vehicle have been consistently low. Only 125 models were sold in July 2011. This was after GM spokeswoman Michelle Bunker was quoted as saying that the Volt was “virtually sold out” due to its popularity — a statement later shown to be misguided. Adding insult to injury, Chevy Volts are under investigation for fires involving the cars’ lithium-ion batteries. For concerned Volt owners, GM has offered free loaner cars.



They sped up rollout at the behest of Obama and his cabal.  There is NO doubt in my mind, NOT because GM  was "so excited".  Unless of course ou count Obama as "GM proper", which I guess he is.



 



I was in the presence of the volt for the first time day before yesterday, getting my truck worked on at the Obama Garage.  I got to sit in it and "turn it on."  So now that I have experienced the Volt (I was not allowed to drive it).



 



My entire working career has been in fields that have involved high"er" technology (the world doesn't stop for a digital editing suite or a loud as hell 80 pound loudspeaker cabinet-but it is indicative of surrounding technology).  I have seen breakthroughs that changed my industry, and I have seen hype. 



Hype is always the same.  Not so new technology packaged in a new way-used in a new angle. ( Shure mics-the Beta SM series.  Nothing new.   Same components tuned a tad different to sound a bit sharper, the claim being more actual graphical accuracy.  Was it?  Yes, but only in one or two important areas, the actual measurable responses of the mics did not change-but I digress).  True technological change is evidenced by the change itself-NOT the underlying technobabble.



 



The  Volt is a hypemobile.  I saw it.



 



It is a battery operated vehicle that goes about as far the battery operated vehicles of one hundred years ago  BUT-it has satellite radio.



The battery stores power by burning coal instead of burning gasoline.  Just like one hundred years ago.  BUT it has a seat belt and modern airbag.



Ad infinitum.



 



 



 



It is a battery powered car adorned by swell trinkets that add nothing to the supposed goal of getting from point A to point B cheaper than you can do it now. 



 



In fact, with the Volt  getting from point A to point B  still costs a ton of money.  SOooooooo, no real achievement there..



 



Then ou look at the sticker price.  we bandy about the price here on SOL and laugh, but when you are standing next to this tiny clown car sized machine that is only capable of going 40 miles in 6 or 8 hours  (do you realize thats about the same speed as people like Benjamin Franklin were able to travel?  Is that amazing or what) unless oi switch back over to "real car" mode (btw, I asked the Director of the Service Department  of this dealership directly-"does the gas engine directly locomote the wheels in order to propel the car, yes or no?"  The answer was yes).



 



 



Forty thousand dollars  You have to look through that dinky little rear window at that number on that wrinkly sheet of computer paper for the full effect.  I was damn near speechless.  Forty thousand dollars.



DO you realize that for forty thousand dollars, you can buy  TWO cars that together will be cheaper to own operate and maintain than one Volt.  Forty Thousand Dollars.



 



 



 



It is a world gone mad, the struggle of good vs evil.  it is why I am a Libertarian.  Dirt stupid people are found at all walks of life and at all levels of power and prestige.  I have no interest in fighting this stupid ass battle against the stupid it will never end.  I just want a way to keep my distance from it.



 



The Volt is a Turd.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

They sped up rollout at the behest of Obama and his cabal.  There is NO doubt in my mind, NOT because GM  was "so excited".  Unless of course ou count Obama as "GM proper", which I guess he is.

 

I was in the presence of the volt for the first time day before yesterday, getting my truck worked on at the Obama Garage.  I got to sit in it and "turn it on."  So now that I have experienced the Volt (I was not allowed to drive it).

 

My entire working career has been in fields that have involved high"er" technology (the world doesn't stop for a digital editing suite or a loud as hell 80 pound louspeaker cabinet-but it is indicitave of surrounding technology).  I have seen breakthroughs that changed my industry, and I have seen hype. 

Hype is always the same.  Not so new technology packaged in a new way-used in a new angle. ( Shure mics-the Beta SM series.  Nothing new.   Same componenets tuned a tad different to sound a bit sharper, the claim being more actual graphical accuracy.  Was it?  Yes, but only in one or two important areas, the actual measurable responses of the mics did not change-but I digress).  True technological change is evidenced by the change itself-NOT the underlying technobabble.

 

The  Volt is a hypemobile.  I saw it.

 

It is a battery operated vehicle that goes about as far the battery operated vehicles of one hundred years ago  BUT-it has satellite radio.

The battery stores power by burning coal instead of burning gasoline.  Just like one hundred years ago.  BUT it has a seat belt and modern airbag.

Ad infinitum.

 

 

 

It is a battery powered car adorned by swell trinkets that add nothing to the supposed goal of getting from point A to point B cheaper than you can do it now. 

 

In fact, with the Volt  getting from point A to point B  still costs a ton of money.  SOooooooo, no real acheivment there..

 

Then ou look at the sticker price.  we banty about the price here on SOL and laugh, but when you are standing next to this tiny clown car sized machine that is only capable of going 40 miles in 6 or 8 hours  (do you realize thats about the same speed as people like Benjamin Franklin were able to travel?  Is that amazing or what) unlessy ou switch back over to "real car" mode (btw, I asked the Director of the Service Department  of this dealership directly-"does the gas engine directly locomote the wheels in order to propel the car, yes or no?"  The answer was yes).

 

 

Forty thousand dollars  You have to look through that dinky little rear window at that number on that wrinkly sheet of computer paper for the full effect.  I was damn near speechless.  Forty thousand dollars.

DO you realize that for forty thousand dollars, you can buy  TWO cars that together will be cheaper to own operate and maintain than one Volt.  Forty Thousand Dollars.

 

 

 

It is a world gone mad, the struggle of good vs evil.  it is why I am a Libertarian.  Dirt stupid people are found at all walks of life and at all levels of power and prestige.  I have no interest in fighting this stupid ass battle against the stupid it will never end.  I just want a way to keep my distance from it.

 

The Volt is a Turd.

 

 

Let me get this right......you SAT in a Chevy Volt?

 

:laugh:

 

You ACTUALLY SPOKE to the "Director" of the Service Department??? a REAL, LIVE salesman?!?

 

:laugh: :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

303

 

Let me get this straight - Jay owns over a hundred cars, yet had the time to log 11,000 miles on his Volt? He must really hate the thing!

 

Gotcha, uses it for a single purpose, sort of like a golf cart. They are fun to drive too. MDH, you are in Baltimore right? I'd like to see you get from fells point to catonsville (6 miles) during evening rush in one of those things. you would be pushing the last 5 miles.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotcha, uses it for a single purpose, sort of like a golf cart. They are fun to drive too. MDH, you are in Baltimore right? I'd like to see you get from fells point to catonsville (6 miles) during evening rush in one of those things. you would be pushing the last 5 miles.

 

Why don't you admit to being wrong instead of switching gears?

 

No, I'm no longer in Baltimore - thank god.

 

If I was though, I know all the short cuts. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.