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Food Allergies and Diet Changes

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KOQ's comments recently about his loving willingness to cook alternate foods for his wife got me thinking. How many of you have to cook something special/different on a regualr basis for family members because of dietary allergies or choices? Is it always a PITA, or do you see some good in it?

 

KOQ is cooking vegan for his wife. Not the worst thing int he world on a limited basis IMO, as it will open some culinary doors that maybe he wouldn't otherwise bother with. I saw a pic in the Christams Eve thread of some no meat chicken product, but I think there are better options out there that they will find. Dona, my wife, was a vegetarian when we met and I developed a much broader range in tastes because of it. I also learned to cook, as she wouldn't/couldn't cook meat dishes.

 

Donna recently went gluten free to try and help with some thyroid issues. I was pissy about it at first (still am sometimes), but she's dropped 15 pounds and feels much better. We all seem to be better off for eating less bread and focusing more on good meats and veggies.

 

 

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My wife doesn't eat beef, pork, or lamb. Since those items aren't a regular part of our diet my kid doesn't enjoy those meats very much either - w the exception of beef steak. So most of the time if I want, for example, beef stew or french onion soup I don't make it because it's either too much food and/or too much work for one. It get's rather boring and tedious at times cause we eat a lot of chicken.

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Loving willingness? :laugh: It pisses me off. My MIL contends she has a shellfish allergy, meanwhile, eats out all the time where things are cross contaminated. I've done it myself at home when cooking for her and no effect. Making multiple meals is a pita, but I do it with a smile because I'm a giver. :)

 

Truth be told I'm not cooking vegan for my wife. She's doing most if not all of the cooking during the week these days, and since she's the one experimenting with the vegan stuff, she's been cooking that way. A little back story. With diet and exercise she lost over 50 pounds a few years ago but then hit a plateau that she's had a very hard time breaking. At the same time her cholesterol went through the roof. She doesn't want to take pills and after watching Dr. Oz and the biggest loser, reading a few books, etc., has decided to give vegan-ism a try until her blood test in February. Let this be proof that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, and the idle mind is the devils workshop. Dr. Oz should be flogged, and I can't begin to tell you how sick I am of the fat people on the biggest loser.

 

In any event. that's the reason for the vegan stuff going on at my place.

 

As far as support, I told her that "We" meaning me and the kids, would fully support at least 2 full blown vegan meals per week. We've done more and will continue to do so and she does have our support, for the most part. She picked up a new recipe for black beans and rice that included corn and water chestnuts and it was actually better than her original recipe, so there have been some successes. There was also the meal that the kids called prison food. :laugh: She's also tried to pass off a brownie made from black beans. I had a fit. It's not a ******* brownie, its' a bean cake.

 

I made her that vegan crap for Christmas Eve and altered my preparation of the Eggplant Caponatta where instead of sauteing the eggplant, which as any one who's cooked eggplant knows, they are like sponges, I sprayed with oil and roasted it in the oven. That saved a lot of oil and therefor calories, so it's not all bad. It doesn't taste the same and by that I mean not as good, but it's acceptable.

 

So, we have picked up a few new dishes that I'd eat again, but only a few, and perhaps will alter the way I cook, a little, but lets face it, I'm a meatosaurus, and have no intention of living a vegan or even vegetarian lifestyle. I have sharp teeth for a reason. She had hoped that I'd embrace this and learn to cook vegan or vegetarian with the same fervor I have other foods. Negative ghost rider, the pattern is full. No desire at all, and quite honestly, it's been a rough couple of weeks that this has been going on. I haven't felt like cooking at all.

 

I take too much pleasure out of food. It's way beyond fuel for me.

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I think for the most part people today eat way too much meat. I don't think humans were made to be meat eaters...look at our teeth. They are a plant/nut eaters teeth. Maybe your wife is onto something?

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I think for the most part people today eat way too much meat. I don't think humans were made to be meat eaters...look at our teeth. They are a plant/nut eaters teeth. Maybe your wife is onto something?

 

First legal and now dietary advice?

 

You are dismissed from this thread. :shock:

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First legal and now dietary advice?

You are dismissed from this thread. :shock:

 

:laugh: I've always respected the dietary choices people make. A twinkie or an apple a day, whatever. Eat what makes you happy. Sucks when you live with a picky eater.

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I don’t have any food allergy/ dietary restrictions going on in the family, but one memorable evening a few years ago I got dragged, kicking and screaming, into a vegan-themed potluck shindig courtesy of the missus. I remember dreading the whole affair at work for the entire week. So one Friday night while my friends were out gallivanting at the sports bar and taking in a rare playoff game, I was busy loyally takin’ one for the team.

 

That evening everybody had to pitch in some kinda flavorless fare and I desperately tried to save some self-respecting face by making this vege chili courtesy of Emeril. It turned out to be surprisingly flavorful and got scoffed up by the bottommost spoonful from the folks that were there. It was really pretty good for vege fare. Mine didn’t resemble anything like the FNTV picture BLAH! (makes me wonder if I added some sweet paprika or tomato paste for color). Didn’t do the rice part myself but that’s an option.

 

Some notes I did jot down on the recipe:

 

  • Scraped off most of the gills on the portobellos (optional)
  • I added 2 Tbsp sugar to the whole pot
  • Use only 2 serranos and careful with the cayenne (I can’t remember but my serranos must have been miracle grow sized). Use heat to taste.
  • I used kidney beans instead of black beans

 

Here’s the recipe if you’re inclined.

 

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I have not eaten meat in 5 months by choice for health reasons. Hence why I haven't been posting much on here. I'm down 40lbs......

 

Come to the Tavern. We will mostly be nice. :laugh:

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KOQ,

 

Check out the Moosewood cookbooks. We cooked from them a lot early in our marriage and still go back to them. ll th recipes are vegetarian and some are full on vegan. There are some good core recipes in there and I learned a lot from them, as I had zero cooking knowledge to bring to the table at that point. We even drove up to Ithaca to eat at the Moosewood a few times. Neat place and worth a look see if you're in the area.

 

Nothing replaces meat. Nothing. When we eat meatless meals we try to enjoy them for what they are. I screwed around with tofu, tempeh, tvp, etc., for awhile, but gave up on "meat substitutes." It's like eating carob and being pissed that it doesn't taste like chocolate. It just isn't going to happen. I can eat those other thngs and like them for what they are, but don't look at them as an alternate to meat anymore.

 

I've been to a lot of vegetarian pot lucks and have had some excellent food. Unfortuneately, I often don't know what I'm eating. :laugh:

 

 

I scoffed at Donna's gluten thing initially, but it seems to be helping. She gained weight last winter and couldn't drop it again. Her thyroid symptoms got pretty bad and she found some connections in some reading she did. Here we are, several weeks later, and she's feeling better and losing weight. I may join her, at least partially, as some of my stuff has started knocking me down again. **** me, but I am seriously tired of not being well. :( Meat is no problem (I need the iron pretty badly), but cutting back on bread products could only help.

 

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I am veg. There are lost of ways to replace meat. Beans and legumes are your friends. Ignore meat substitutes. Veg hot dogs taste like band aids. Quorn fake chicken is ok. Morningstar veggie burgers are good for throwing on the grill. I started making my own though this summer. Still working out the kinks. Tofu is fine, but takes some time to figure out how to cook it right.

 

Black bean, corn and rice burritos are where its at. Add vegetables to everything. Making pasta for dinner? Add in spinach, mushrooms, broccoli and zucchini. You will come close to meeting your iron and protein requirements.

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I think for the most part people today eat way too much meat. I don't think humans were made to be meat eaters...look at our teeth. They are a plant/nut eaters teeth. Maybe your wife is onto something?

 

We are the same, physiologically, as our ancestors who lived 50,000 years ago. There are cosmetic differences (we are taller, for example), but our bodies haven't really changed since then.

 

Up until the agricultural revolution, all members of Homo sapiens lived in a world that was dominated by a scarcity of food. Our species overcame that by being able to eat almost anything, and by being able to subsist by eating very, very little for extended periods of time, and then gorging when food was plentiful. Think of eating leaves, roots, insects, and the occasional rodent for weeks on end, and then eating half your body weight of the big animal (deer, mammoth, whatever) that you just managed to kill.

 

This is the kind of diet that the human body evolved to live on: few calories most of the time, supplemented by occasional gorging. (I always wondered what the Lenni Lenape did when they made it to the Jersey shore in the summer, after a hard, long, cold, winter, and found the waters teeming with all kinds of aquatic life. After a hard winter, they must have eaten clams and oysters until they oozed from their pores. But I digress). The problem for the modern human is that this kind of diet is incompatible with two things: the abundance of modern food, and our innate desire to eat as much as we can, which is borne out of the scarce-food world our forebears inhabited.

 

Different people deal with this in different ways. Some turn to vegetarianism, sometimes for honorable reasons. But don't think for a second that a modern person's choice to eschew animal flesh is proof that humans weren't "meant" to eat meat: humans and meat consumption go together, historically and physiologically speaking, as tightly as "drunk" and "disorderly."

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We are the same, physiologically, as our ancestors who lived 50,000 years ago. There are cosmetic differences (we are taller, for example), but our bodies haven't really changed since then.

Up until the agricultural revolution, all members of Homo sapiens lived in a world that was dominated by a scarcity of food. Our species overcame that by being able to eat almost anything, and by being able to subsist by eating very, very little for extended periods of time, and then gorging when food was plentiful. Think of eating leaves, roots, insects, and the occasional rodent for weeks on end, and then eating half your body weight of the big animal (deer, mammoth, whatever) that you just managed to kill.

This is the kind of diet that the human body evolved to live on: few calories most of the time, supplemented by occasional gorging. (I always wondered what the Lenni Lenape did when they made it to the Jersey shore in the summer, after a hard, long, cold, winter, and found the waters teeming with all kinds of aquatic life. After a hard winter, they must have eaten clams and oysters until they oozed from their pores. But I digress). The problem for the modern human is that this kind of diet is incompatible with two things: the abundance of modern food, and our innate desire to eat as much as we can, which is borne out of the scarce-food world our forebears inhabited.

Different people deal with this in different ways. Some turn to vegetarianism, sometimes for honorable reasons. But don't think for a second that a modern person's choice to eschew animal flesh is proof that humans weren't "meant" to eat meat: humans and meat consumption go together, historically and physiologically speaking, as tightly as "drunk" and "disorderly."

 

I agree with most of the above, except that we were are not designed to eat the type of meat and quantity of meat that we consume now. Sugar and carbs are over abundant now too. Fat is rare in nature, as is sugar. Refined carbs are non-existant. We eat tremendous amounts of fat and sugar now, with few people eating true whole grains. We've altered (gentetically engineered) almost all of the grains we eat and much of the rest of our food as well. Food allergies and digestive disorders are becoming more and more common. The stats for diabetes, especially amongst children, is scray as hell. If you look at that stat as it relates to kids living in poverty and it's downright horrific.

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