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just want to know how everyone chooses their gear. Does weight ever play a factor.Do we choose by what some one else may prefer before testing it ourselves.i try to choose more light weight materials. how about you what floats your boat.

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Affordablitility plays a large role for me having a young family. So it is trying to get the most out of my purchases. Neccesity plays a large role in that also, is it something i need versus something i want. Lightweight is helpful but not the end all for me, i dont mind extra weight if it is comfortable. So i would say productivity, affordablitly, and nessecity drive most of my purchases. Except some plugs which i buy cause they catch me as much as they catch fish.

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I think price and affordability plays a factor in everyones prospects. I would add that quality, reputation of the brand and performance are also tops on my list. Weight is becoming a factor as I get older. I noticed the last time out how heavy my wading boots are!

 

I look for quality and function. I am lucky enough that I dont have a car payment, a huge mortgage(rent an apartment), my daughter is a teenager and doesnt need diapers, formula, or lots of clothes since she wears a uniform to school so she basically is a weekend dresser, lol. And since her mother and I share custody, the cost of raising her is truly shared on the money side though emotionally it is really hard to be a dad to a teenage daughter! No credit cards, no loans, etc. So I have a little extra to splurge on gear. However, I understand that high price doesnt mean high quality all the time. Functionability is more often a deciding factor. I started out with $100 combo's from the local big box stores. They worked. Did they hold up? Of course not. But like any hobby, fishing takes time to develop the skill and patience and along with these I think comes the legitimate need to have better gear so you can focus more on fishing than your gear. One less thing to manage. As you get older I think tatses get more expensive. When I was 25 years old, I fished for trout with a $100 fly rod and even if I could have afforded it, I would not have paid $600 for the Orvis I use now. Why? Lots of reasons I guess. And likewise, I just bought a Penn Torque. It was expensive but it is a good real, has capability that my other reels do not when it comes to salt water and maintenance. Nothing sucks more than getting to the beach and finding a seized bearing in your reel. And it also sucks when your fly rod doesnt have the action to throw a nice roll cast in a tight spot when the trout are eating anything that his the water! But I dont run out and buy the latest and greatest. I have been using my trusty Slammers for a few years and I have Abu's on my freshwater largemouth rigs that are 20yrs old and still going strong. I will read all I can about what I am looking at buying. I will ask people, fondle it in a store, and then sit on it for a while, months, maybe a year or more. If the bug still has me then I start looking for the best price on the item. And just as important is longevity. Will this item last a while? I look at a good reel as something I will get years and years of use from. Same with a rod. The high cost up front is easier to swallow when you amortize it over five, ten, or twenty years.

 

None of this means that the most expensive gear is gonna make you or me a better hunter, golfer, fisherman, etc but it does lend itself to being able to concentrate on the variables in the game like the stalk, your swing, or presentation. And like I said, there is plenty of gear out there that is very good and very affordable. So I think it all becomes a personal choice at some point. I would guess that a veteran striper fisherman could catch bass with a $50 WalMart combo and I can catch trout with the same old $100 flyrod so it is that law of diminishing returns. But there is a personality to this also. Most outdoors types who fish or hunt are usually mechanically inclined to some degree, the type that changes their own oil or fixes their on lawn mower. So they/we appreciate fine craftsmanship, quality engineering and attention to fit and finish that comes with pricier gear. This is something I see many people gravitate towards also.

 

 

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I always do a search here on SOL to get the latest and archived reviews of alot of products before purchasing and have been for many years. Great Resource Here.. Thx TimS..

 

Next would be to get my hands-on at the local tackle shops and also the saltwater shows and fishing flea markets, mostly for rod/reels or drytops for example amount other things...

 

 

Light weight is a key factor along with the product being made of top quality materials.. Price is important but I am not aftraid to pay top dollar for something if I feel it is worth it...

 

 

Steve

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Is that the sound of ice cubes I hear:)

 

Hmmm I know I don't think like many here. I chose equipment to fit the area I'm going to fish and make sure it can handle what I am going to put it through.

Function and how it fits in the situation is what is paramount. Rods and reels are tools and sometimes a cheap hammer will do the job but other times you need a more specialized hammer to fit the circumstances you find your self in.

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well to start.I want water and sand proof reels saying that is probably the one most important thing i choose. after that durability and weight plays a big role in what i purchase. being old and retired ,price does not come into play. i buy what i want, i would say when purchasing something if it is tried and true that makes a big difference to me i want equipment that i know will hold up to the conditions i fish. so i do listen to others who might have what i am thinking of buying, color does come into play. i like green or dark colors mostly when it comes to rain wear, Now buying lures well that's another story it seems the more colors they make the more of everything i buy;.

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When I first started surfcasting I joined a club, the CT Surfcasters. Over the years the guys in the club were a great help. From belts and bags to lights to knives to plugs to dry tops - not just rods and reels. The Club has trips to different areas and there is no better way to see if gear is good for different conditions then to go on a Club trip to Cuttyhunk with some guys and

see for yourself . So you may want to join a club. I know there are a lot of good ones on LI.

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I have noticed by reading other threads that some people overload their equipment.

One of the most popular rods Lamiglas GSB1321M is rated for a max of 40# test and I see people using

50 -80# test.Even at a inlet i think that is overkill. We use to use 20# mono and thought that was great . i used

15# big game in Montauk and never even gave it a second thought.Now with braid you can use 20# with 6# mono equvil.

Using heavier braid 40-60# dont you feel your loising casting distance. I use 20- 30# power pro for Montauk and open beaches.

Sometimes I use 50# at the inlets. Also the heavier braids probably will void warrentees.We spend so much on our rods we should

try and protect our investments.

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