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winter storage & E 10 gas

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I am getting ready to pull my boat and am undecided whether I should drain the tank or fill it . I have gotten several different opinions and  can't decide. I have been told that ethanol fuel will attract moisture  and have also been told that statement is BS. Anybody have the real answer.



 Greg


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It is pretty well established fact that ethanol does draw water, it also seperates after sitting some time and this also creates problems, added to this E-10 gas a tendency to eat rubber fuel lines,,rubber gaskets and molded Gas tanks, cut crud and varnish from sides Bottom of metal gas tanks, I just cant think of any thing good about the Shyt,

 

Personally i would drain tank and put fuel in car/truck tank to get rid of it, fog the engine down and store it for the winter.

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[img=

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2596510/width/300/height/300]

 

it's proven that E-10 fuel sucks moisture from air. I add these 2 products plus some regular sta-bil then fill it up with premium and I'm good to go in the springtime. I only use premium when I store it for the winter. all of the boat manufactures and marine mechanics I know recommend filling the tank for winter storage in the northeast. I've got a 90 gallon tank

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[img=

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2596510/width/300/height/300]

it's proven that E-10 fuel sucks moisture from air. I add these 2 products plus some regular sta-bil then fill it up with premium and I'm good to go in the springtime. I only use premium when I store it for the winter. all of the boat manufactures and marine mechanics I know recommend filling the tank for winter storage in the northeast. I've got a 90 gallon tank

 

I've been doing the same for years along with changing out the fuel filters every season and come spring the 240 gallons are good to go. It is also nice to have what feels like a free tank of gas at the start of the season.

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Boat U.S. had a very good article on the net recently about the myths of E-10. The chemists from some of the big companies weighed in. Bottom line is that you either want to fill to at least 95% full or totally drain the tank. Leaving a little gas is a recipe to get condensation forming in the tank. I don't know how you would completely drain most tanks so that leaves the first option. Oh - double the stabilizer and fuel treatment (ionizer) of course.

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I use StarTron & E-Zorb all the time in my fuel and do no different after filling the tank (- 5%) for the winter. 



 



StarTron is also a stabilizer, so no need for the Stabil. E-Zorb will actually prevent phase seperation of the alcohol and gas (none of the other products do this). 



 



No need to "spike" it for the winter, just make sure the treated fuel runs through the engine. 


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I run the tank down as much as I can, which is pretty close to empty thanks to my twinscan/floscan.

 

Besides the water issues...and I dont care if its stabilized or not, these new fuel blends are crap. I'd rather start fresh in the spring, any water that does accumulate will be absorbed by the ethanol in the new gas or my racors.

 

Been doing this since the advent of E10 and no issues.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by makorider View Post

 

I run the tank down as much as I can, which is pretty close to empty thanks to my twinscan/floscan.

 

Besides the water issues...and I dont care if its stabilized or not, these new fuel blends are crap. I'd rather start fresh in the spring, any water that does accumulate will be absorbed by the ethanol in the new gas or my racors.

 

Been doing this since the advent of E10 and no issues.

 

 

 

Depending on where you store your boat, but....... a tank left empty in the winter with a cover on the boat will heat up in the day and cool at night which condenses water on the walls of the tank. The cooling air will draw in new moist air into the tanks through the vent, repeating the process. By the end of the winter you could have close to a quart of water in your tank with the walls oxidizing, if its aluminum. When you fill your tanks in Spring, the E10 gas will cause some of the oxidation to become suspended in the fuel to either be sucked up and fed to engine or fall to the bottom as sediment. Either way, not good. Lastly, the water in the tank will mix with the alcohol and not be filtered out by your Racors (haven't you noticed that your Racors hold little to no water since E10 gas started being sold) - which is not good for your engine.

 

 

 

Fill and treat the gas is the better option.

 

 

 

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Depending on where you store your boat, but....... a tank left empty in the winter with a cover on the boat will heat up in the day and cool at night which condenses water on the walls of the tank. The cooling air will draw in new moist air into the tanks through the vent, repeating the process. By the end of the winter you could have close to a quart of water in your tank with the walls oxidizing, if its aluminum. When you fill your tanks in Spring, the E10 gas will cause some of the oxidation to become suspended in the fuel to either be sucked up and fed to engine or fall to the bottom as sediment. Either way, not good. Lastly, the water in the tank will mix with the alcohol and not be filtered out by your Racors (haven't you noticed that your Racors hold little to no water since E10 gas started being sold) - which is not good for your engine.

 

Fill and treat the gas is the better option.

 

 

Wayne, where do you come up with a quart? I'm not going through all the math again. BUT, if you take the time to crunch the numbers, the amount of water that can be generated over the course of the winter, even being generous with humidity, etc... is minimal at best for my 200 gal. tank. I forgot what I came up with...I just remember chuckling at all the worry.

 

Never thought about the oxidation, but then again thats what good filters are for.

 

I'll take my chances running empty. Without issue to date. I think I have 200 times less worries come spring as these new blends suck.

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Boat U.S. had a very good article on the net recently about the myths of E-10. The chemists from some of the big companies weighed in. Bottom line is that you either want to fill to at least 95% full or totally drain the tank. Leaving a little gas is a recipe to get condensation forming in the tank. I don't know how you would completely drain most tanks so that leaves the first option. Oh - double the stabilizer and fuel treatment (ionizer) of course.

 

yes I'm a Boat U.S. member and read that article myself. good stuff

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Quote:

Originally Posted by makorider View Post

 

Wayne, where do you come up with a quart? I'm not going through all the math again. BUT, if you take the time to crunch the numbers, the amount of water that can be generated over the course of the winter, even being generous with humidity, etc... is minimal at best for my 200 gal. tank. I forgot what I came up with...I just remember chuckling at all the worry.

 

Never thought about the oxidation, but then again thats what good filters are for.

 

I'll take my chances running empty. Without issue to date. I think I have 200 times less worries come spring as these new blends suck.

 

I said a quart of water based on an observation made by myself and the maintenance supervisor at my marina. We were having a bourbon at Skippers Pub in Northport one evening and began debating the two approaches to winterizing boats. He said that they had just recently installed a new 230 gallon aluminum tank in a boat that was just hauled out for winter storage, and that they had left it empty. He suggested that we drain the tank in the Spring to see how much, if any, water was in the tank. The next Spring, he pumped out a little over 2 quarts of water.

 

 

 

Keep in mind that results will vary on where the boat is stored (relative humidity) and how it is covered, and whether or not the tank is encapsulated in foam (no foam, more condensation).

 

 

 

Hence, I said a quart based on a 100 gallon tank. No math, just an observation of a very unscientific experiment.

 

 

 

The way I look at it is..... why take a chance if you can fill your tank with fuel (less 5% for expansion in the Spring when the fuel warms and expands) and not have to worry about it - provided that you treat the fuel properly in the fall.

 

 

 

If you want some math, here it is:

 

 

 

At 50F and 100% humidity, an empty 200 gallon tank could contain 12.92 grams of water vapor, or 0.46 ounce of water.

 

If all that water vapor were to condense in the tank over 4 months (Dec-Mar, 120 days), there would be 55 ounces or water in the tank, or 1.7 quarts.

 

 

 

If the air under the cover of the boat were to get higher than 50F and there is water in the bilge, and the vent was also shrink wrapped to be in the same airspace, the amount of water vapor in the air would be higher, and hence there could be more condensation in the tank.

 

 

 

Keep in mind, that I am not saying that all tanks that are left empty will have that amount of water in them, but they could - and possibly more than what we measured.

 

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Personally I run mine dry. if someone happens to be wrong with their guesses and it turns out not to be ok so store I will still have a good motor and tank come spring, No fuel = no worries.


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According to Yamaha, fill the tank 90% treat with starton or the like and you are good to go in the spring. Leaving it empty on the other hand , in the northeast you,ll get more water in your tank from the air inside the tank warming, cooler to warm if left empty or close to empty. Water in the tank will turn to lacquer like substance.

 

fill it up in other words.

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Having taken off and cleaned the carbs on my Yamaha 3 times so far after letting the boat sit for as little as 2 1/2 months with stabilizer in the fuel (year round) and the 10 micron filter changed at least once a year I have gone to system that works flawlessly for me. I fill my tank (only 40 gallon) with stabilized fuel, prior to using it after sitting I drain the tank and burn the fuel in my truck, a fuel injected 4 stroke in a passenger vehicle is more tollerant to fuel than a carbed 2 stroke, put fresh fuel in the boat , the 3 times I have done this both the boat and the truck ran great.

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http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2596510/width/300/height/300]

it's proven that E-10 fuel sucks moisture from air. I add these 2 products plus some regular sta-bil then fill it up with premium and I'm good to go in the springtime. I only use premium when I store it for the winter. all of the boat manufactures and marine mechanics I know recommend filling the tank for winter storage in the northeast. I've got a 90 gallon tank

 

 

done this for 15 years no issues. 2005 225suke 2000 hrs not a hicup.

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