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Billy the bass

CTS S8 surf rod

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Looking for a new lighter rod for the 2012 season. Doubt about buying a new century rod or a cts s8 surf rod. For example the SE1362-2 S8 13'6'' 3-6oz 2pc

 

Anybody has more information about the cts surf rods for casting OTG or pendulum. I read some articles on the internet that the cts isnt suitable casting the pendulum?

Any information is more than welcome. I want to use the new rod for a reel: avet or penn 525 mag or abu 6500 ct.

 

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Any zoned action rod that falls with in A moderate

rating can be pendulum or ground casted but as

you work A cross the weight rating spectrum you

will have to modify the drop or and the rotation.

At certain times when your throwing at the high

end and throwing A large bait, it might be easier

for you to get better distance with A aeralized

unitech. The only way to figure out the equipment

is through trial and error.

 

Tonto Kawalski

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I put my S-8 13'-6" 5-8oz rod through its paces.

 

No pendulum but I regularly do OTG with 5 & 6ozs over 700ft with it (it's a fishing set-up, spinning reel / braid & Lowriders).

 

Can't say I've heard the warnings you have. That said, my concern with any thin walled blank is torsion; conventional guys usually introduce less than spinner guys unless they are casting way out of plane and snaking the rod. Spinner guys, especially those that can't keep the rod / reel aligned with the direction of cast can do some damage (add in "typical" spinner high frame guides and you really have a problem! Low breaks on factory Super Surfs come to mind). So, like most breaks, user error / poor mechanics, whether acknowledged or not, is the culprit for breakage (especially with a payload comfortably within a rod's rating).

 

If you have a smooth in plane cast you won't have any problems. My only concern would be with the 3 - 6oz rating you mention. If you have a powerful cast you will find that you will be overpowering the rod with a suitable weight and bait. Generally a rod that works well for full pendulum with a 5 - 6 ounce payload would be a rod that performs best for 8oz or more for a "fishing" cast.

 

And just a note about rod action, the S-8 series is a fast action rod and requires a fast finish to keep it loaded. Only you know your cast and what type of rod "fits" it. It may be that a more moderate action Century would be better suited for your cast. I would look at the Carbon Metal Crest. I have one that I am quite happy with (I pretty much only use it in casting tournaments, . . . spinner and mono).

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I put my S-8 13'-6" 5-8oz rod through its paces.

No pendulum but I regularly do OTG with 5 & 6ozs over 700ft with it (it's a fishing set-up, spinning reel / braid & Lowriders).

 

Can't say I've heard the warnings you have. That said, my concern with any thin walled blank is torsion; conventional guys usually introduce less than spinner guys unless they are casting way out of plane and snaking the rod. Spinner guys, especially those that can't keep the rod / reel aligned with the direction of cast can do some damage (add in "typical" spinner high frame guides and you really have a problem! Low breaks on factory Super Surfs come to mind). So, like most breaks, user error / poor mechanics, whether acknowledged or not, is the culprit for breakage (especially with a payload comfortably within a rod's rating).

 

If you have a smooth in plane cast you won't have any problems. My only concern would be with the 3 - 6oz rating you mention. If you have a powerful cast you will find that you will be overpowering the rod with a suitable weight and bait. Generally a rod that works well for full pendulum with a 5 - 6 ounce payload would be a rod that performs best for 8oz or more for a "fishing" cast.

 

And just a note about rod action, the S-8 series is a fast action rod and requires a fast finish to keep it loaded. Only you know your cast and what type of rod "fits" it. It may be that a more moderate action Century would be better suited for your cast. I would look at the Carbon Metal Crest. I have one that I am quite happy with (I pretty much only use it in casting tournaments, . . . spinner and mono).

 

Thanks a lot ReelinRod for your help. Much appreciated. I dont speak the lanquage of your tongue but I think I understand. One thing I dont understand is below:

 

Can't say I've heard the warnings you have. That said, my concern with any thin walled blank is torsion; conventional guys usually introduce less than spinner guys unless they are casting way out of plane and snaking the rod. Spinner guys, especially those that can't keep the rod / reel aligned with the direction of cast can do some damage (add in "typical" spinner high frame guides and you really have a problem! Low breaks on factory Super Surfs come to mind). So, like most breaks, user error / poor mechanics, whether acknowledged or not, is the culprit for breakage (especially with a payload comfortably within a rod's rating).

 

Will you please explain to me why high frame quides will be a problem? So I understand I have to use low breaks quides for the rod? Will you please so kind to tell me a little bit more about it? Hope you will do.

I m very happy with your explanation. I need another kind of fishing because of medical problems to my shoulder. I need a lighter rod for the OTG cast with a max at 4-5 oz. The rod shouldnt be too heavy. I dont use the pendulum any more because it damage my shoulder. I have Century and ZZiplex rods so now I m looking for a lighter rod to handle. Hope you will give me a little more explanation about the quides to use . Regards

 

 

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Will you please explain to me why high frame quides will be a problem? So I understand I have to use low breaks

quides for the rod? Will you please so kind to tell me a little bit more about it? Hope you will do.

 

You're not reading it right, or understanding. :) I doubt I can explain it any better, but I'll try to draw the picture from A different angle.

The splining or calipering process combined the way you're holding the rod when full blown power casting is very important. If

everything isn't working together. You might brake the rod. This at time happens when fatigue kicks in and you're not concentrating.

Then hit the rod in A very un-orthodox manner. It's not really the guides. :)

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Will you please explain to me why high frame quides will be a problem? So I understand I have to use low breaks quides for the rod? Will you please so kind to tell me a little bit more about it? Hope you will do.

 

As I said this problem usually doesn't show itself for conventional guys because of how the rod and reel is held and how that orientation is maintained through the cast simply by the mechanics of the cast. When a conventional set-up is cast the guides are on the "under" side of the bend following the rod. "Snaking" the rod refers to an abrupt direction change during the cast. One starts out an OTG with the sinker in plane but then one "comes over the top", forcing the sinker to make a direction change. I remember seeing some remarkable photos of this where the rodd is a twisted noodle but I can't find them now. Maybe someone has some saved and can post them.

 

During a spinner cast the guides are leading the rod and if a perfect reel position can not be maintained, twist is introduced onto the rod. The greater the guide spacing is, the more pronounced the problem is. And as I said, the higher the guides hold the line away from the rod the more twist is imparted on the blank (a longer handle on the "wrench").

 

390

 

This is where guys who are programmed that a surf rod doesn't need more than 4 or 5 guides are so behind the times 9and should stick with slow action, thick walled rods LOL). Modern thin walls (and faster actions) demand more guides.

 

Even companies who should know better build rods their customers want to buy rather than building them right (and not selling them because ignorant fishermen say, " there's too many guides on that there rod") Sparse layouts like a factory Lami Supersurf with 4 guides show breakage between the greatest torsion points, generally between the reel and first (highest) guide.

 

In the worst cases this effect is simply poor form; not holding the reel so the reel leads the cast. This is either due to a weak grip and not being able to hold the reel up or just a sloppy casting motion that starts sideways and never recovers.

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Chunkster: thx for your reply!

 

ReelinRod: thx so much for your next explanation. I understand. It is now clear to me. I use the rod with a conventional and I put enough guides on the rod; I dont cast a pendulum, only a OTG cast. I dont use the rod out of the rod specs. If I understand you right then I dont will have a problem with this thin walled blank when everything is in balance and with a good casting technique.

 

Now I only have to figure out how many sic quides are required. How many quides for example do you have on your ctq rod (the heavier one)? Do you have your quides on the soft or the hard side of the blank. That is always a discussion. One said soft the other said hard. I m going to figure it out.

 

So for the second time many thanks for your time and your very good input. Have a nice day/week.

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Conventional rods are suppose to be built on the hard part or spline. From what I understand the mandrel that cts uses

and there fibers combined with there wrapping pattern, curing process it makes the spline really hard to find.

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Conventional rods are suppose to be built on the hard part or spline. From what I understand the mandrel that cts uses

and there fibers combined with there wrapping pattern, curing process it makes the spline really hard to find.

 

I'd go with 8 + tip for the guides, where's the reel seat going?

316

 

Hi Chunkster; yes you are right about the quides on a conventional used rod; the quides should be mounted on the hard side (part) of the blank.

 

I dont use a reel seat, I use coasters or a rod clamp. Casting with the conventional reel low. I was thinking about 10 guides and a tip quide.

 

Very much thanks for the help!

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Billy,

 

You have gotten great information here. Rod is one of the best spinning casters I know. He also has a great amount of knowledge and will steer you right..

 

On casting (conventional) setup the guides can be placed on the hard side of the spline. This works great for fighting big fish, keeps the rod from trying to tourque or rotate in your hands.

 

But, for casting...

 

All of my tournament rods have the guides placed on the "soft" side of the blank. This does a couple of things for you. The rod doesn't try to tourque or twist on you while under extreme load. It allows for a truer bend while loaded and when the rod unloads the tip recovery is quicker as you are unloading into the hard side.

 

Hope this makes sense.

 

Tommy

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Tommy would you be able to provide us with A

percentage of A cast from the guides on each

side of the blank from A tourney rod. With A full blown tournament

cast and let's say A Hatteras cast with an eight fishing rod

From there I'd say the users would be able to

make A better decision on which would be best

for there fishing application. We don't always have

the proper footing and safe area to perform ground

casts. As for the field as far as I'm concerned it

has been written in stone and thak you for taking

the guess work out again. :)

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Tommy would you be able to provide us with A

percentage of A cast from the guides on each

side of the blank from A tourney rod. With A full blown tournament

cast and let's say A Hatteras cast with an eight fishing rod

From there I'd say the users would be able to

make A better decision on which would be best

for there fishing application. We don't always have

the proper footing and safe area to perform ground

casts. As for the field as far as I'm concerned it

has been written in stone and thak you for taking

the guess work out again. :)[/quote

 

Without taking the guides off of a tourney rod and moving them to the "hard" side and then performing tests it would be very difficult to assign a percentage. Many years ago I tested both ways but I honestly don't remember the numbers. I do know that there is a significant difference in feel. A slightly mistimed cast is amplified with the guides on the hard side.

 

 

Your results may vary and I encourage you (and anyone else interested in max distance) to give it a try both ways. You'll probably be surprised at the difference in feel and tip recovery. Testing is the only way you'll find out what works for you.

 

I'm not really sure how much you would be able to tell casting 8nbait. 10-12 oz is a big payload and I'm not sure how much difference I'd be able to tell on the rod spline.

 

Tommy

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Billy,

You have gotten great information here. Rod is one of the best spinning casters I know. He also has a great amount of knowledge and will steer you right..

On casting (conventional) setup the guides can be placed on the hard side of the spline. This works great for fighting big fish, keeps the rod from trying to tourque or rotate in your hands.

But, for casting...

All of my tournament rods have the guides placed on the "soft" side of the blank. This does a couple of things for you. The rod doesn't try to tourque or twist on you while under extreme load. It allows for a truer bend while loaded and when the rod unloads the tip recovery is quicker as you are unloading into the hard side.

Hope this makes sense.

Tommy

 

Tommy, thanks you very much for your input (knowledge) from a great caster like you are. I keep that in mind. I think when I have buyed the blank I put the quides on the blank with tape. Then I try what is best for me: on the soft or the hard side of the blank. Very good information; much appreciated.

 

BtW: I asked cts a question about the blank: the answer is below. But honestly I think 10 oz is too much for that blank when it is rated 3-6 oz.

 

 

The casting weight of this blank is on the light side. It can typically through up to 10oz quite easily. This series is designed as a pendulum cast.

It is very light weight and very powerful.

 

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