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CBMike

Whats your answer to the Sebile stick shad?

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I dont know about you guys but I got to try to come up with something that can be thrown in a time when the Stick Shad's undeniable productivity rears its ugly head. I like to throw my own wood as much as possible being the proud buildo that I am. But gosh darn those things simply out produce a pencil when the fish are'nt breaking but you know they're going by. I've made a few sliders and they work ok. There is obviously something to the bouyancy of the pop out plastic in contrast with the heavy tail and belly weight in the SS's keal. It's pretty clear that making an exacty duplicate of the stick shad with wood is virtually impossible considering the weighting scheme, but I think something that fishes similar and maybe even casts better is entirely possible. Any thought? Im thinking of starting with heavy weight in bouyant wood, and in contrast less weight in hard wood and seeing how the shapes I come up with respond. Happy building guys, look forward to seeing what everyone turns out this year.

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Actually, it is possible to do a wood version of that bait. I saw a few that Johnny did last spring.

 

Basically, you'll be making a glider. Light wood is a good option, though many musky plug builders use heavy wood. You'll want to determine how much lead it takes to sink the wood. Split that into two equal sections. The first section will be placed near the nose of the plug. The second section of lead will go near the tail. You'll want to place that lead so that the plug sinks level or just very slightly tail down. Keep the low in the belly of the plug. It will take some experimenting to get it down. Hopefully some of the musky guys that build gliders can fill in some more details. I've done a few smaller ones that I've used for smallies and done well on them. Have not had anything eat the larger ones yet, though I have not thrown those as often.

 

Jigman

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Spent a few hours in the shed this morning and came up with a pretty sweet proto. AYC slimmed down and shaped with the band saw and rounded out on the belt sander. I'm hoping for a slow sink or even barely floating finish product. Had to put in quite a bit of lead to sit proper, we'll see once its sealed and rigged what it does, but so far I was pleased. Gonna try some more dense wood next round. Will post some pics when it comes along a bit more. Wood love to see other builders' ideas.

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Hi guys,

 

Long time lurker here. Thought I would chime in on this one. I was messing with this problem last year when I couldn't get myself to shell out the$25 they wanted for the SS. I made one from PVC in two halves so I could easily rearrange the lead placement. Here's a pic of the finished product.

271

After several attempts, I was able to get all the action characteristics of the stickshad. It wobbled on the fall, it had a nice side to side swimming action on a steady retrieve, and it flanked like crazy with a long glide.

 

By splitting the bait, I was able to drill a series of holes along the belly and into the tail of each half. I made a mold from a block of wood using a slightly smaller drill bit to make lead weights to fit flush with the top of the holes. So each half of the lure has its own weights. That way, I didn't have to work around the through wire. I also cut short sections of a wood dowel to fill the holes I wasn't using for lead to displace any water that got in there during testing.

 

Unfortunately, I only made one before moving on to other projects, and it was lost to the rocks before catching any fish.

 

Good luck.

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Nice work there snagnbrag, that things a beaut! Shame about the loss. When using pvc are you melting the plastic into a mold? Heluva build.:shock:

 

 

CBMike,

 

The PVC I use is AZEK trim board. It's a cellular foam with a density of .55 g/cm3. You can shape it just like wood.

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I think that's the same method that Timmah used for his...

 

Funny you mentioned it. I saw this yesterday and found took photos today, yes pvc for the handcarved (sanded). The top and bottom one sink and work like a spook/jig. But i've had more success when the topwater bite ends with the middle one. Sort of a pregnant cigar needle with slugs in the center and just forward of center and the rear a little bigger than the front. It swims in current 1 to 2 feet deep depending on rate of retreive in a long sweeping swim. Floats with the nose just underwater. One day when the topwater action stopped I got 5 fish when the three guys around me with sebiles got none. I was amazed and made 5 more immediately.

 

[img=

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2564708/width/600/height/451]

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Like those shapes there Bristol Stripers, I remember last year those were gonna be for a swap. That chubby needle is awesome, so simple its ingenious. Love your work. Thanks for sharing!

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Let's keep this going.

 

What's the best/easiest/most effective construction?

 

Soft wood plus lead or Hardwood with no lead?

 

Flat sided or cylindrical?

 

Screw eyes or through wire?

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...Soft wood plus lead or Hardwood with no lead?

Flat sided or cylindrical?

Screw eyes or through wire?

 

Yes to all of the above. Multiple ways to get them to glide. A lot will depend on the size/shape you are using. Its something that you'll have to experiment with. Depending on the shape, there is a range of depth (top to bottom) and thickness that will work right. A musky fishing friend of mine told me that a lot of the needles he has seen seem to be set up similar to a glider in terms of weighting. I read it somewhere else that starting out, take a spook type design and load the lead right in that and you have a easy to make glider. Go from there in working up something different.

 

Jigman

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"Hand carved" solution I am working on:

 

P10004382.jpg

 

This was painted for test swimming and is partially sanded back off on the way to prepare it for molding. The key in all the designs above is to have a deep body so that you can get the weight down low and centered to slightly tail weighted. This way the lure will twist and flash with jerks and wiggles in response to current and changes in retrieve.

 

It's a "split type" construction where you glue two pieces of wood together with a piece of paper between. You then can use a jig saw to rough the shape, then sand/whittle to final. You then easily spilt it apart with a Utility Knife and can then Dremel out the inside to make room for interal weight and the harness. This one has about 1 oz of weight around the middle eye.

 

It floats slightly tail down with the center of gravity low and slightly to the rear of the middle hook eye.

 

The lighter the wood and the greater internal weight when used in balance will create the most "twitchy" lure with the best action. Heavy woods are better for pure gliders, imo.

 

I plan to finish some in Mack and Bonito for use in Panama.

 

best

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