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kevino

Intermediate Line - Casting Tips?

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Hi All,

 

I've been a long time lurker here and have learned a lot over the past few years from the informative posts. I learned (and have been fishing) a floating fly line (Rio Clouser) for the past three years and have gotten comfortable with casting, controlling the slack line, etc.......at least comfortable enough to get the fly where I want it to go about 70% of the time :)

 

I recently decided to try the Rio Intermediate (Striper) line and ended up frustrated. Any first timer tips you all can give me for using an intermediate line? I do most of my fishing from a boat on the local freshwater lakes here in NC for bass, pickerel, etc. I wanted to try the intermediate to get a tad bit deeper, but after about 10 minutes of flailing around I reeled up and pulled out the floater.

 

Any advice?

 

Thanks in advance.

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You may want to slow down using the Intermediate line. It is heavier than the floating line & you need to time your casts. Is the line the same weight as the rod you are using? Or did you up a weight? Its all in your timing.

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Thanks. I'd been using a 9wt Clouser on an 8 foot 8 wt. So I went ahead and got a 9wt "striper" for the same 8 foot 8 wt. I'm making about 40 to 50 foot casts. Fly was the same....a size 1/0 EP minnow. I've had good success with it on the floater.....just wanted to try getting a tad deeper. I will work on the timing. I was thinking it would be a seamless transition given the same rod, same line taper profile, grain weight, etc. Probably why I ended up a little frustrated...

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Sinking lines cast "faster" as they are thinner and less wind resistant than floaters.They require less effort to cast because of this and you may be putting too much power/effort into it.Does it feel like it's kinda jerking around,not unrolling smoothly? It's not the line,You need to adjust your timing.Watch behind you for the loop to unroll.Don't cast off the tip like a lot of floating lines encourage(bad habit),cast using the full flex of the rod more.Push more w/ the butt and less tip snap.



A full sinking line will really wreck you if these do as the are very thin and cast like rockets but your timing has to be much more precise than w/ a fat,lazy,wind resistant floater which because of more surface area moves more slowly for the same effort.



 Do yourself a favor and master that intermediate as it'll help you catch more fish.Floaters cause you to miss the more subtle hits as there is always a hinge effect from the surface,whereas the sinking line points directly to the fly.It's absolutely my favorite type of line and I use it for probably 80% of my fishing whether ocean stripes or my local lake or river.



 


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Hang on you got a 9wt line for a rod marked up as an 8wt. Its possible that you are overloading your rod.

Second thing is, this is an I line and once it is under the water and say you have cast 40 feet it cannot be lifted off the water like you would a floating line. You have to retrieve in the right amount of line found by trial and error and then roll cast the line out straight onto the surface of the water. I stress straight, if not straight do another roll cast until it is. Then before it has time to sink go into your back cast. A line marked up say as a 9wt will weigh the same in any format if it is a std line built to AFTM standards.. A floater will weigh the same as a fast sinker and an I line. I think your problems are you are trying to lift a sunken I line straight out of the water and all you will do is strain your rod.

There is no need to alter your casting stroke to cast an I line compared to a floater. The I line in fact should be a much easier line to cast especially in a head wind as it is thinner in diameter for the same weight.

To make life easier when you have found the optimum length of I line that you can easily roll cast make a long as in 12 inches mark with a marker pen on your fly line by your reel. I do this and trust me it makes life so much easier. I also put on a small blob of aquaseal so I can find my pick up point in the dark. This is even more important.

If your maximum casts are around 50 feet even with the floater then you have some fundemnetal problems with your casting that need sorting out.

 

Mike

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Floaters cause you to miss the more subtle hits

 

That has not been my experience with a floating line.

 

kevino, when you say "a tad deeper" you're probably not too far off. What is the sink rate of the intermediate? I'm wondering how much further you're really getting down. 1-2ips doesn't get you very deep unless you're going to let it sit for a while. Perhaps a full sink tip might be what you're looking for? You could also add a shot or two to the leader right where you tie the fly in. That will also help you get down faster.

 

Good luck.

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Thanks for the help guys. I will try to apply what I've learned here the next time I'm out.

 

As far as casting distance....It's not that I can't cast more than 50 feet....it's that I typically don't need to. I position my boat in the sweet spot and typically fire off 30/40/50 foot casts usually with one back cast. That's why I've been using the 9wt line on the 8wt rod.

 

And.....yes, I was trying to lift say 15-20 feet of sunken line out of the water :confused: and it didn't work so well. I hear what Mike is saying about the "sweet spot". I will find it and mark it. And ROLL CAST! Then back cast and shoot!

 

I really appreciate all of your feedback. This place is great - one of the best sites around. I've learned a whole lot from you guys!

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Kevino,,

 

Heh its good that we were able to help. Its a buzz for us I can tell you. I guessed wrong about your distance capability thats the chance we take I guess. LOL. You are not alone though having a spot of bother casting sunk lines. I got given the same message a long time ago to. If you have never fished an I line before how are you to know the best way of dealing with it once sunk unless you have had casting lessons. Ok hopefully now you will be well set. The same technique is used to unplug faster sinking lines to. I see why you were uplining by one line now but as you get better you should not need to unless your rod is very fast, or stiff.

 

Mike

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Kevino,

 

I use a 9 ft 8 wt and throw a 9wt Intermediate, I don't know where you live so the only advise I can give you is what I do and it works very well. I can throw an Intermediate 70 ft in one or two false casts in most cases.

 

The key is to strip in the line in about 20 too 30 feet from the end of the rod and with the rod tip low to the water drag the line out of the water and back and into a back cast. This is nothing more than what is referred to as water hauling. This loads the rod and then the key is to let the line shoot out the back on the back cast and then shoot out more line on the forward cast.. On the second back cast shoot more line out the back and on the forward stroke shoot the line and let it go.

 

Works on the mechanics of this and the timing, the distance will take care of it self in a short time.

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