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JimW

Think I pushed a brisket through the temp plateau

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Smoked a 7 lb flat today. Drum was running 225ish all day. I usually never foil until they come off to rest. Had read something about the plateau on "Amazing Ribs". He said the temp gets stuck at the plateau because the meat is cooled by evaporation and not melting collagen as I had read before. Also said if you foil when meat temp gets stuck you will speed things up because you prevent the evaporation. At about 3 hours we were at 165F so I foiled, no liquid added. Flat was just over 200F and done in a total of 5 hours. I don't know if I'm going to like it. Lot's of liquid inside the foil, so any bark must be history, but I was amazed at how quickly this thing cooked. With no bark I may have to turn the whole mess into burnt ends but I think we can live with that.

 

I really have no idea if it was just this particular flat or if foiling it pushed it through. May have to try it on a butt to see how quickly you can smoke one of those in a pinch.

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Damn briskets.  Drive me nuts.



I have never once made one that was as good as the briskets i have had in Texas where good ole boys just poke them with a stick to figure out if they are done, pisses me off.    I got some ribs on,


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cooked a corned beef flat and cabbage tonight

 

Irish wife looked and e as if she walk through a time warp (not rach yet)

 

 

 

Used pickling spices that were in the cubbard. Too much allspice, Never going to to that again.

 

 

Meanwhile, been reading up on brisket for a few months now as my keystone copper bbq team needs to practice some brisket for next season.

 

 

I figure it's something you have to mess up for half a lifetime before you know how to tell when it's done.

 

 

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Brisket is already tricky enough and this Texas crutch thing (foil) just seems to add another layer of complete bewilderment for me.

 

The meat came out very good in an "if you like leftover brisket" kind of way. Tender, tasty, moist, sliced perfectly but nothing crunchy, no bark, kind of like it is reheated the next day.

 

Mike- Son was asking me about pastrami so may have to look into this curing and smoking business. Wasn't terribly happy with corned beef in a bag smoked into faux pastrami when I've made it, but it was edible. Let us know if you get a good brine/spice mix going.

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I'm not covinced on foiling ribs yet, but we'll see now that I can see the actual pit temp and control it better.

 

 

I think in the past I have been running my cooker too hot and blowing through temp when I foil.

 

 

Pulled pork is a completely different matter. I think you can get a good bark by 160 and saving the juices that get trapped in the foil really does enhance the flavor. I also think letting it rest for a while in the foil and cooler, where the temp comes down at a slow steady pace continues the collagen breakdown.

 

 

I have been reading posts by the competitive folks on brisket Two things, many cook more than one brisket at a time, and they report very different results within the same cook. Also, it seems the chemical injections are playing a bigger role. Makes me wonder when you see the competitive guys stuggle so much with brisket.

 

 

 

Corned beef/pastrami: For corned beef, I find a simple mix of pepper, coriander, bay leaf, onion and garlic wrapped in a cheese cloth works quite well with store bought corned beef. There is so much good beef flavor that stuff liek allspice etc ruins it. I trimmed the heck out this one removing the entire fat cap. Speaking of foil, when it was done I pulled it and wrapped in foil to keep warm while I added the cabbage to the liquid to cook. Made for a very nice uniform presentation.

 

 

as for pastrami, that's a totally different animal and I am spoiled by the likes of Bens Deli. Interesting that I read pastrimi is a three step process. Bined, smoked then steamed.

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I may have to try to figure out when brisket's done by poking it with a stick. Temp and time don't seem give you that much of a clue.

Best luck for me has to be full packer cuts, no foiling and paying no attention really until it's had it's 1.5 hours per lb. Just can't find anything but flats most of the time

 

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I am going to try this method

 

 

cook temp 250

oak and hickory

 

 

inject with an au jus that has beef stock and melted bacon fat (to help the brisket not dry out) at least 1/2 day (overnght if possible)

 

rub

 

 

place a large foil fan on a grate below the birsket to catch the drippings, Place brisket fat side up

 

 

cook for four hours

 

 

Place brisket fat side down with more au jus to bring the liquid in the pan to 1/4 inch

 

 

baste with pan drippings evey hour

 

test the flat for tenderness at 180, 190 and evey half hour thereafter

 

 

I suppose testing at 180 will let you know who it feels before tender so that you can discern when it does "give up the ghost" as I read someplace.

 

 

 

once you think the brisket is done, remove from heat and cover the pan with foil and hold in a cooler covered in towels up to four hours. at this point you removed the tip to make your burnt ends.

 

 

 

30 minutes before slicing, open the foil to vent

 

 

strain the au jus and dredge slices to moisten.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The more I eat of this flat the more I like it. I think the rub could've been better and there could've more of it but the foil method will get another shot. Seemed to save hours of cooking time and the jus in the foil was tasty and plentiful.

 

 

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