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Suilleabhain

The 2011 Atlantic striped stock assessment

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Things look okay

 

 

"The 2011 Atlantic striped stock assessment update indicates that the resource remains in good condition with the female spawning stock biomass (SSB) estimate at 109% of the SSB target and 137% of the SSB threshold (see Figure 1). The estimated fishing mortality rate (F) in 2010 was 0.23, below both the target (0.30) and threshold (0.34). Striped bass are assessed as a single stock although there are at least three distinct stocks contributing to the coastal migratory group:

 

Hudson River, Delaware River, and Chesapeake Bay and tributaries. The striped bass stock complex is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring.

 

The stock assessment chair presented the 2011 stock assessment update. Overall the resource is not overfished and overfishing is not occurring with the female spawning stock biomass (SSB) estimate at 109% of the SSB target and 137% of the SSB threshold.

 

The Board reviewed the 2010 FMP Review; all states were found to be in compliance with the management program in 2010. It was noted that three states (Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Maryland) adjusted their 2011 commercial quota in response to overages in 2010."

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Sowhy has fishing been so poor here on Long island and elsewhere?:confused:

 

Great fishing in NJ in the last two weeks...i have not seen so may fish getting caught for such a long duration..

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These stock assessments are full of crap! There's no way they could possibly count and estimate how many fish there are of a species of fish. They say this stuff to try and satisfy us anglers who can clearly see there's a population problem. The organizations (crooks) that do these surveys care about there own interests and lie to us fishermen because they are being paid off by corporate lobbyists to say everything is ok to fill their pockets. If the organizations told the truth of the health of the striper fishery, they would be fired and out of a job. collapse is the only thing that would tell the truth. Period. Sorry to be so brash, but this how America functions. People of power Lie to justify their crimes.

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I don't think it was such a bad season. Spring, the west end from Barnegat to Jones hammered the fish on jigs and live. North Shore was consistent. Shinny to Montauk was the usual and from reports the beach was on fire at times. When the bait moved east and the whales and threshers got on them, they were pushed into Demo for a bit and that was good.

Look at the whole picture, not your catch. The fish may not have hugged the beach but they were there in numbers.

I boat fish, my friends boat fish and they are from everywhere. The west end fall night fishing was not up to par, par being 2002, but I think that's pollution from Bay Park and Cedar Creek.

 

If Steamboat reads this, please chime in. You have another perspective.

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to me its simple.......I dont see near as much bait in the water as I did 5, 10 15 yrs ago......it seems to be steadily going down.

 

no bait no fish.

 

one thing that struck me in the recent NJ bite, the number of keepers. (many)

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John M I agree with you on the issue of too many size fish on the jigs and live a mile off the beach. About bait, this year my friendly bunker guy had spells where the bunker were too deep and too far offshore for his set up. He went and bought a bigger boat to get more reach next year. Bunker in 80' of water. Sandeels were deep again this year from what I heard on bluefin fishing. But, if you go back to the late 70's, the sandeels would mass and hold on the Patchogue Grounds for weeks at a time. Since they didn't move, the partyboats anchored and jigged bluefish in one spot all day. Maybe the bait is in a cycle.

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An update. Met my B-in-Law for Thanksgiving dinner. Told me he & a friend were jigging, plugging and tossing shads in Ambrose Channel the other day. 25 bass with a ratio of 1.5 keepers to 1 short and some mega bluefish. They were spitting up what sounded like anchovy. He's not savvy on bait but said definitely not sand eel. Fish are there, just too deep.

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Bass and bait don't necessarily have to show up where you usually fish. It's a big ocean out there. 2 years ago, NJ was ground zero for the fall run. Last year it was a dead zone. This year it's ground zero again. Go figure.

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Some years are surf years, Some years are boat years. If you limit your fishing to what you prefer, rather than where the fish are, your success will be very limited.

You have to change where, how and when you fish. The fish are there. They are there every year. Albeit some years are better than others, no doubt...Usually due to my needing to work while the bulk of fish move quickly past my coast.

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