Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
BrianBM

Hunting broadhead question

Rate this topic

34 posts in this topic

Most footage I've seen of successful tree-stand archery shots taken on deer show the arrow passing through the deer entirely. The hunter descends from the stand, and waits a bit to start trailing - but first retrieves the arrow.

 

I wonder - rather than waste energy on clipping shrubbery on the far side of the deer, wouldn't it be better to set the blades at a slight angle to the long axis of the shaft, much like the feathers, so that the arrow rotates within the deer and cuts more flesh?

 

Second question. I saw footage of two archers hitting a fairly stupid boar hog in the 200+ class, perhaps 250+ lbs. One arrow hit the boar at what would've been a great placement for a bullet, forward edge of the shoulder. Not only did it not penetrate, it bent. The archer showed the camera the arrow, with the bladed point at almost a right angle to the socket of the head, and the shaft of the arrow. He attributed this to the thick layer of gristle surrounding the shoulder on large boar hogs.

 

There are a few luxe knifemakers on the market who will make you a filleting knife, if you wish, of stellite (almost 80% cobalt, almost 20% nickel; 1-2% iron, manganese, etc. depending on intended use. Stellite is so tough it's displaced tungsten carbide for some industrial drill uses. resistance to corrosion is high even in extreme conditions of heat, pressure, and hard radiation, so it's used in nuclear reactors. And it will take and hold an edge better than steel.

 

Has anyone ever heard of this stuff being used in an arrowhead? Just curious.

 

(Of course, it's quite possible that the archer hit a large bone mass. But that's not the explanation he offered.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most footage I've seen of successful tree-stand archery shots taken on deer show the arrow passing through the deer entirely. The hunter descends from the stand, and waits a bit to start trailing - but first retrieves the arrow.

I wonder - rather than waste energy on clipping shrubbery on the far side of the deer, wouldn't it be better to set the blades at a slight angle to the long axis of the shaft, much like the feathers, so that the arrow rotates within the deer and cuts more flesh?

 

I think you would have big aerodynamic problems if the blades were angled at all. They would fight the spiral from the fletchings as the arrow traveled, and really I don't think it would improve results.

 

Broadheads are brutal killers as they are, I shot a doe once and was able to watch the whole process. It took a couple bounds and then started walking....dropped stone dead after walking about 25 feet, never even twitched when it hit the ground.

The whole thing took less than 10 seconds.

 

With a good shot the deer is dead before the hunter even catches his breath.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you would have big aerodynamic problems if the blades were angled at all. They would fight the spiral from the fletchings as the arrow traveled, and really I don't think it would improve results.

Broadheads are brutal killers as they are, I shot a doe once and was able to watch the whole process. It took a couple bounds and then started walking....dropped stone dead after walking about 25 feet, never even twitched when it hit the ground.

The whole thing took less than 10 seconds.

With a good shot the deer is dead before the hunter even catches his breath.

 

I saw one once that had a hole opened so big in its abdomen that everything from the diaphragm back fell out as it ran. The thing still went 80 yards with only a heart and lungs left in it. :shock:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw one once that had a hole opened so big in its abdomen that everything from the diaphragm back fell out as it ran. The thing still went 80 yards with only a heart and lungs left in it. :shock:

 

Shot a doe like that once. Actually the first doe I ever shot

 

 

It was standing on top of a mound of dirt looking at me. Shot it right in the chest but part of teh bullet pretty much gutted her.

 

 

She fell down and rolled down the embankment to me lol

 

 

Rolled her over and everything was pretty much out :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot a doe like that once. Actually the first doe I ever shot

It was standing on top of a mound of dirt looking at me. Shot it right in the chest but part of teh bullet pretty much gutted her.

She fell down and rolled down the embankment to me lol

Rolled her over and everything was pretty much out :D

 

Apparently, it is quite perplexing to track a deer and find a gut pile without a deer next to it. Who woulda thought?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wild boars have a pronounced "shield" of gristle covering the shoulder, feral hogs somewhat less so. Most archers know enough to stay away from shoulder bones as getting through them it a dicey proposition on even younger animals.

 

Spiral broadheads have been tried and even when(if) they perform, kinetic energy that is needed for penetration on longer or quartering shots is siphoned off for rotation. When arrowing deer you want the arrow to exit. By my estimation, it takes up to 10 seconds for a double lunged or heart shot deer to collapse, they can cover some distance in that 10 seconds so you want the maximum amount of blood on the ground- that means two holes.

 

 

220

 

Users of the above broadhead claimed spectacular results and an equal number of remarkable failures.

 

YMMV

 

:v:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not a bow hunter, strickly rifle. I would think that a rotating arrow would stop turning upon penetration. :huh:

 

They do. The above head, IIRC rotates independent of the arrow shaft permitting, at least theoretically, the head to perform it's "devastating corkscrew of hemorrhagic mayhem!" There's no hype, like broadhead hype :D

 

:v:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

pigs have a hard,strong shoulder plate/bone avoid when bow hunting .

 

any sharp broadhead will kill a deer when put in the right place.

a critter shot by a gun & bullet does by shock.

a critter shot by bow&arrow dies by hemmorage.

 

if you hunt you'll know that some guns prefer certain bullets. same way with broadheads some fly better (straighter) than others. find the one that flys true for you.

the mechanical heads (open up on impact) fly great. some people love em some people hate em.

 

no need for a broadhead to rotate in the animal...if its sharp and place where it should be it will do some awesome damage.

I've used thunderheads, rage, muzzy's...they all kill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do. The above head, IIRC rotates independent of the arrow shaft permitting, at least theoretically, the head to perform it's "devastating corkscrew of hemorrhagic mayhem!" There's no hype, like broadhead hype :D

:v:

 

Broadhead fan boys are more rabid than VS/ZB nuts combined. Also the haters hate like no other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LBI Surf Rat has it down correctly in my opinion....and is also an arguement to never use mechanicals...a broadhead kills by laceration and subsequent blood loss...not shock...a well shot deer with any fixed broadhead will pass out and die before he really knows what happened. A mechanical broadhead is a poor substitue for a hybrid bullet/broadhead combo...ever see one on a hunting show hit a shoulder or a rib square, makes a terrible noise and you watch a deer run off with an arrow in its side that penetrated about 2 inches. Archery is a total sport...that includes learning how to match arrows and broadheads, and tuning bows for proper flight....if you don't know how learn, don't substitute the process by using a mechanical broadhead.

If you need a 5 gallon paint bucket of blood on the groudn to find a deer, work on your tracking skills and woodsmanship. Simple two blade solid broadheads kill deer, they break ribs,, and if you are off line or get a deflection off a limb, cause everybody does it sooner or later they will go right through a shoulder blade. I use single bevel solid broadheads...part of the theory behind that is the single bevel, if not initially a complete pass through, will continue to turn and works its way out the other side...it also penetrates bone much better. In personal experience...I had a deflection on an elk that resulted in a higher and further back hit than i wanted...with a 600grain total weight arrow and broadhead combo...elk ran 35 yards and the arrow worked all the way through the elk and came out the groin...try that with a 80 grain mechanical head and skinny carbon arrow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanx buckmaster.

 

im not totally against mechanicals but just like different(smaller) bullets/calibers they do have there limitations.

where i hunt the deer are rarely over 130lb..jersey pine barrens deer. small by basic big game hunting standards. i've used mechanicals with success. the shot has to be "right" for me to take with a mechanical.

 

I wouldnt try and put a mechanical head thru the shoulder of a deer much in the same i would try same shot with a 6mm bullet vs a .30 cal bullet or my 50. cal muzzleloader.

give me a magnus or a muzzy head and might try the shot. maybe. with a mechanical its not an option.

 

i've never hunted elk or out of state for that matter but for a critter that size a mechanical head would not be a option for me. probably use a muzzy or a magnus stinger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i also like the fact you mention tracking. ya never read to many articles anymore or see shows that focus on tracking and/or blood trailing.

merchandising and media hype has made that go away. sad really.

every year I get a call to help tracking and its sad that people give up so fast b/c they didnt have buckets of blood on the ground or didnt "watch em drop". lol!

 

a double lung hit deer is still gonna run like hell for 10 seconds. buddy of mine didnt believe me his deer went nearly 200 yards. he gave up after 100. we found it.

 

Im all for using modern technology( i do!) to your advantage but dont forget the basics. good (not great) equipment, sharp head, shot placement, tracking, watch your wind.

you practice/preach those you good to go.

 

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.