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Flytyer37

Newbie to salt

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I've been fly fishing for a lot of years, but am new to salt.  Tried it in May on the Eastern Shore of VA.  No luck.  Then again, the bait guys didn't have much luck either.  The only thing I got was REALLY bad sunburn on the tops of my feet.



So, with renewed vigor and some casting practice, I'm going to give it another try in the Spring (hey, I live in Nebraska so its not easy to pop down to the shore).



Setup:



TFO Lefty Kreh 10 wt.



Rio 10wt bonefish line.



Reel...?  Looking for a Teton reel 'cause they're rock solid and I have a tendency to break stuff.



 



Flies - got tons. Winter in Nebraska is a great time to tie...and tie... and tie.



 



Technique? - been practicing Mark Sedotti's Sayonara Sling.  



 



So, big question here.  Do you folks generally use a sink tip or full sink in the surf?  



 



Secondarily, does anyone spey cast in the surf?  Effective technique?



Frank 


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I usually go with a full intermediate, unless I'm fishing with poppers, then I switch to a cheap floater. I find it's easier to keep the line tight to the fly with a full sink or intermediate line than with a floating line. Waves can push a floater around and put slack into the line, making for a less sucessful retrieve, at least for me.

 

As for spey casting in the surf, it depends who you ask. Most guys on here will say not to bother because you have enough to worry about while surf fishing. Rich Murphy and some others do use some spey casts to change direction, but they are very experienced surf fly fishermen. I'd say not to bother until you have a bit more experience. You could however use a fast action spey rod for two-handed overhead casting, but you should probably become proficient with the single hander before supplementing your surf arsenault with a two-hander.

 

Others will chime in. The above is just my opinion, and it differs from others', so just focus on having fun. It gets to be less fun when it gets too complicated.

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Thanks for the info.  I've been working with the spey cast in still water here in Nebraska.  Getting fairly good at kickin' it out there. 



With the Sayonara Sling, I can get 100' plus on my 8wt with a 6" fly.  More if I can use the water tension. 



As a stream and still water fisherman, I'm used to the water moving left or right, however, the up down when the waves crash on my line is another complication that I have no way to replicate in practice (maybe I can go the the wave pool at the amusement park in Kansas City?). 



Right now, we have some good weather till the water becomes kinda solid.  Guess I'll do some casting, tie some flies and keep looking for my Teton Tioga reel for the rest of the year.



Cheers from the great plains



                Frank Reid


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I've been using a 350 grain sink line in the surf this fall, fishing the NJ coast. When the tide is really running, or the surf is up a bit, I feel like an intermediate line doesn't cut through fast enough, and gets impacted by the wave action too much. Besides, for me, it's also a lot easier to shoot that sinking line 80+ feet out there than it is to my intermediate line out over the breakers when the surf is rocking and you don't want to wade out too far and get dunked.

 

-B

 

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Hey, I live for getting dunked.  My last name is Reid and to do a "Full Reid" in some circles means to "greet the creek with your face." 



Sides, I grew up on the left coast where the water is a LOT colder.  Don't mind a swim (unless I'm in waders).



Frank


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If you Spey cast you are qualified to use Shooting Heads ;)

 

Shooting heads are cheaper and you don't need spare spools which lessens the cost more. Most shooting lines are better than running line used in WF lines and produce longer casts because of less friction and weight. But best distance line, thin mono does not stay in stripping basket or boat floor/deck and stretch a lot so hooking a fish far might fail. Shooting heads become very cheap if you build and tune them from old/discounted/barstool etc lines. Out of one DT and Spey line you can build two or three heads.

 

I have not yet fished salt water wading where I could not have been able to fish efficiently using Spey casting with TH rod. But usually there is no advantage either. Also landing a big fish alone with TH rod would have been difficult occasionally. Up to 55Ft head Spey lines OH casts without overloading current TH rods too bad.

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Frank

 

You live to get dunked. At last a like minded soul. Too many Guys are relucantant to get wet or engage fully with the sea. With the long rod its hard not to get at least damp. LOL

 

Spey Casts in the surf. If you think you can get them away whats to stop you trying. Obviously not as easy as in a river with flat water. Waves and breaking waves are going to badly affect your anchor and therefore the loading on your rod.

If you can cast 100 feet you are doing something right .It may be more difficult to achieve these kind of distances on the NE coast but don't let that bother you. As to your choice of a fly lines that will depend on the surf and the wind and how the fish want your fly. From the beach an I line in wf format is very useful as is say a D7 on a sandy beach when trying to get your fly into the hit zone quickley. I lines cover 1 foot to 6 feet deep water well but if the surf is up and the time each casts has before the waves dump it back at your feet the D7 or D8 can be very useful. Work on your roll cast as you are going to need this a lot to get your line unplugged and also to re-position it, especially at night to make casting safer. Never be afraid to thrust your rod top under the water to help keep your flies fishing deep especially in a lateral flow.

 

Apart from the technicality of the gear you need to learn how to find your quarry. Are you ok with that? as its the subject of another post.

 

 

 

Mike

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So, big question here.  Do you folks generally use a sink tip or full sink in the surf?  

 

 

I use a floating line 99% of the time in the surf. It gives me the option of presenting on the surface, on the bottom, and all points in between.

 

And it's a fun way to fish. :-)

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Mike Oliver View Post

 

Apart from the technicality of the gear you need to learn how to find your quarry. Are you ok with that? as its the subject of another post.

 

 

 

Okay, head east 1324 miles and turn right at the beach.  If that fails, BREW PUB!!!

 

 

 

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Here's a list of a few books on stripper fishing that will get you going in the NE and any other waters that hold Stipers. There are many other great books but these are the ones I regard the best regarding Techniques and Zen.

 

Kenny Abrams

Striper Moon.

The Perfect Fish.

 

Ray Bondorew

Stripers and Streams

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Flytyer37 View Post

 

 

 

 

...Secondarily, does anyone spey cast in the surf?  Effective technique?

 

Frank 

 

Two handed overhead casts will work.  Holding anchor in the surf is a challenge.  It can be done but I hope there's no one behind you if you blow anchor...freak.gif

 

 

 

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