NYArcher

Deer Tails

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after you"ve skinned the tail, lay it hair side down and carefully remove the exess meat from the skin with a razor or sharp knife. hand wash it with saop to remove any grease. salt it to remove the exess moisture .tack it to a board to let it dry for about a week or so outside.. I'm not sure of the "right" way to do it, but this has worked for me plenty of times.

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Are there any videos available on skinning a tail?

 



Quote:

Originally Posted by cobia_slayer View Post

after you"ve skinned the tail, lay it hair side down and carefully remove the exess meat from the skin with a razor or sharp knife. hand wash it with saop to remove any grease. salt it to remove the exess moisture .tack it to a board to let it dry for about a week or so outside.. I'm not sure of the "right" way to do it, but this has worked for me plenty of times.



 


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To skin a deer tail:

 

1. Obtain a deer tail.

2. Obtain a short, stiff bladed and sharp knife - a razor knife would also suffice.

3. Turn deer tail so white side is up - starting at the thick end with the bone protruding, make a cut all the way to the tip of the tail.

4. Work the skin off the tail bone until you can get a grip on the bone then pull off skin.

 

You gotta be careful, as the skin comes off the tail as it gets closer to the tip, the skin will want to tear - you may need to use the knife to separate the skin from the tail near the tip.

 

TimS

 

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To be honest, nothing really needs to be done to a deer tail before you can use it to tie bucktails or flies. Skinning the tail or otherwise preserving the tail is so that it doesn't rot and/or stink. If it rots, the hair will fall off the skin - and that's only if the rotting flesh stench doesn't get ya first :b:

 

If you want to store the tails, even for a very short time, without having them rot - they need to be skinned and the meat/fat removed from the skins - then they should be stretched out, hair side down, and the skin covered in borax or kosher salt - they'll dry pretty quickly, maybe a week. Then you can scrape off the excess salt and store the deer tails - preferably some place fairly dry and with a little ventilation.

 

TimS

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Quote:

Originally Posted by JPlaziak1 View Post

My dad just rips the tail away from the bone, i dont know how he does it, but its pretty fast



Tim's instructions are right on target. I trim a little as I pull the bone from the skin and be careful toward the very tip as he said. If you start to see a tear work from the other direction. I prefer Twenty Mule Team Borax over salt. Do a SOL search on topic. Member BBuzzi has some great posts.



 


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I follow the steps that Tim S. outlined, though I continue to cut around the tail bone until it can be removed without tearing any skin....scrape away as much fat as possible.

Flatten out and stretch the tail, since it will dry in the shape that you set it up at this point..........Use roofing or similar nails to attach it to some wood......Cover it with kosher salt to wick out the remaining fat and moisture.........at least a week, the longer the better. Then wash it in some mild detergent, rinse it and hang to dry.

Here's what the tail looks like after deboned and ready to be salted....................

 

.450

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Are the tails the only useable part? Is the white the only good stuff or is it just better for dying. I've thrown dozens of hides away over the years. There is a lot of white on the underbellies. Is it useable?

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Are the tails the only useable part? Is the white the only good stuff or is it just better for dying. I've thrown dozens of hides away over the years. There is a lot of white on the underbellies. Is it useable?

 

all of it is able to be used, just for different things. the tail is the best for tying jigs because of its lengh and its ability to "breath" in the water. I'm not 100% sure, but i believe the belly is used for spun deer hair flies and some dry flies.

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Deer belly hair is hollow so it tends to flair and spin around a hook shank when tied on a bare hook. Great for tying big Bass flys. I use it on some jigs when I want bulk or hair that does not breath as much as buck tail. Such as jigs for very fast current where buck tail gets pushed around too much. The hollow hair will make a jig sink slower and can increase time in a bite zone.



Save some long white doe belly hair and try it  it is very interesting stuff to work with.



Alum is the best product to dry skins and lock the hair to the hide.



M


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As noted, the tails are best for bucktails and most flies as it is the only hair on the deer that won't flare up horribly when you tighten up the thread on it :b: Hollow white hair is great for spinning on a hook shank and then trimming it to shape - like with two of my favorite flies:

 

[img=

 

http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/2477709/width/383/height/168]

 

The white, hollow belly hair is very desirable...but only for spinning, it's generally too short and too hollow for jigs :o

 

You'll notice that as you get further from the tip of a deer tail the hair will start to flare more and more - the best jig hair is the stuff that flares the least :th:

 

TimS

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