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gray gables

Yo Bob G?

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Sadly, I think you'd stand a better chance of seeing Bigfoot than a wild pheasant in Ma. A few, as in very few stocked birds do survive the winter providing they get in and around a food source such as home bird feeders, and learn to roost at night.

But this wasn't always the case. When I was a kid growing up in central Ma, there were large pockets of wild birds all over central Ma. Two of the better spots were Packachog Hill in Auburn, and several large tracts of undevleoped land right in Worcester of all places. But development took care of that.:( Wild pheasant need very specific cover to survive, and unlike wild turkey, they're not very adaptable once that cover is lost.

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before 9/11 I used to hunt an area up in nashua that abutted hollis NH, part of that area was the runway for the airport, there was a strip of land that was about 100 wide that ran the whole stretch of the runway, part of that there was a big patch of knarly pricker bushes that we used to go thru that had alot of pheasants, but they were smart, they would go from one side of the runway to the other, they never left the runway area, in this particular area we could shoot our bows,no guns, but this is all gone due to security reasons from 9/11, I don't hunt birds, was just curious that's all,

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during spring breeding bird surveys, a few pheasants are heard crowing in various places across the state (MA), these places tend to correspond to being near areas where stocking occurs. Despite the virtual absence of breeding activity, MA still has a cock only restriction in coastal areas (largely east of 128 and Rt. 3) to preserve those "breeding" females. 



 



the thing about pheasant habitat is they are very, very dependent on large acreages of agricultural lands, grains, corn etc. This is why pheasants do quite will from the mid-west through the plains.. lots and lots of ag.  There just isn't much of that left in the northeast. The other factor is that even where there is substantial agriculture (CT Valley, Champlain Valley), most modern farming practices are too efficient, meaning there are seldom those brushy hedgerows and shelterbelts that pheasant truly need. often what you find are row crops that very abruptly transition to mature forest. mature forest is not pheasant habitat. 


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Bob,

I remember running my lab across from the Worc. Science Center, The Sisters of Notre Dame/ Worc. State Hospital fields and close to me house off Clark street for native birds. One of my favorite & consistant spots was by the old green house on the state hospital property. Now its the Beechwood parking lot...sad.

 

 

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Bob,

I remember running my lab across from the Worc. Science Center, The Sisters of Notre Dame/ Worc. State Hospital fields and close to me house off Clark street for native birds. One of my favorite & consistant spots was by the old green house on the state hospital property. Now its the Beechwood parking lot...sad.

 

he i'm working there now at the new pysc. hospital. A lot of woods out back. maybe birds still around....maybe not a lot of coyetes seen :(

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I think there's enough suitable cover out this way where a transplant of northwestern birds could be successful. Grab a few dozen from South Dakota, let em' loose on a private posted large farm, and see what happens. One problem I see is suitable cover isn't really connected region wide so the pheasants probably wouldn't expand the range on their own like turkeys do. Still, it would make for a good experiment.


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he i'm working there now at the new pysc. hospital. A lot of woods out back. maybe birds still around....maybe not a lot of coyetes seen :(

 

RR: There is a nice deer herd back there & turkeys. It's great to be in the city and see the wildlife.

 

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he i'm working there now at the new pysc. hospital. A lot of woods out back. maybe birds still around....maybe not a lot of coyetes seen :(

 

RR: There is a nice deer herd back there & turkeys. It's great to be in the city and see the wildlife.

 

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We used to run our basset hound around the state owned land in North Tewksbury in the mid 80's. She would flush a few pheasants. We always heard them in the morning. Now with the proliferation of red tail and other hawks I would think any chance of a pheasant being hatched in the wild would be slim in eastern Mass.

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I grew up in Marshfield. Back in those days the town was covered in abandoned cranberry bogs. The wild pheasant population was booming.

We also had a State pheasant farm where they raised birds for stocking.

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