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Mislabeled Seafood

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Read a recent article in Consumer Reports about mislabeled seafood and the numbers were astounding!

' Among our findings:

 

- Only four of the 14 types of fish we bought—Chilean sea bass, coho salmon, and bluefin and ahi tuna—were always identified correctly.

- Eighteen percent of our samples didn't match the names on placards, labels, or menus. Fish were incorrectly passed off as catfish, grey sole, grouper, halibut, king salmon, lemon sole, red snapper, sockeye salmon, and yellowfin tuna.

- Four percent were incompletely labeled or misidentified by employees.

- All 10 of the "lemon soles" and 12 of the 22 "red snappers" we bought weren't the claimed species.

- One sample, labeled as grouper, was actually tilefish, which averages three times as much mercury as grouper. The Food and Drug Administration advises women of childbearing age and children to avoid tilefish entirely.

- Out of curiosity, we sent the lab something labeled "colossal sea scallop" because it looked suspiciously huge. The results showed that it was a scallop, but not the labeled species.

 

How does that happen?

Our findings are in line with those from other recent studies showing that 20 to 25 percent of seafood around the world is mislabeled. ' :confused:

 

 

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How does it happen? Much of it is intentional. The named species are what everybody knows. Most people can't tell one from the other. You pass off an "inferior" species for something people recognize, and get more money for it. It's all about the Benjamins, baby. Mako passed off as swordfish, flounder sold as sole, hake for cod, etc...

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,,,,,,,Solution-------catch your own..rap 'em the head---maybe bleed 'em out---gut'em put 'em on ice ASAP.......vacuum or double wrap if freezing........label species date of capture.....do up portion control sizes from 4-to-16 ounces-your preference.....do the freezing correctly.........enjoy later...or eat 'em fresh.................granted, some of the exotics do not exist locally.........i.e. New England there a dozen or so fish species readily available from shore/inshore boat fishing.............:)

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,,,,,,,Solution-------catch your own..rap 'em the head---maybe bleed 'em out---gut'em put 'em on ice ASAP.......vacuum or double wrap if freezing........label species date of capture.....do up portion control sizes from 4-to-16 ounces-your preference.....do the freezing correctly.........enjoy later...or eat 'em fresh.................granted, some of the exotics do not exist locally.........i.e. New England there a dozen or so fish species readily available from shore/inshore boat fishing.............:)

 

That is good for us fisherman but not the person who doesn't catch their own. I do not think I have ever bought fish from a market.

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Sad part is most of the seafood is imported and a high percentage is not even inspected.

 

It's just unfeasible to inspect everything. You think it's expensive now :shock:. However, the Country Of Origin Labeling law does help the consumer.

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One of our local stores sells Boston Bluefish.

 

 

Couple years ago I asked what the difference was between the Boston blues and the blues I catch in Delaware or Maryland. Lady told me Boston blues are a cold water species and the other 2 are warm water :huh::dismay:

 

 

 

Its not even really bluefish :laugh:

 

 

 

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One of our local stores sells Boston Bluefish.

Couple years ago I asked what the difference was between the Boston blues and the blues I catch in Delaware or Maryland. Lady told me Boston blues are a cold water species and the other 2 are warm water :huh::dismay:

Its not even really bluefish :laugh:

 

It's Pollock

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One word for this (and it's a Boston word)... Scrod, means nothing.

 

Chilean Sea Bass...look it up, means nothing.

 

Blue Crabs are a species....Sapidus, only one member.

Most of the crab meat you see (all of it from overseas), with pictures of a blue crab on the package, is not blue crab meat. Some of this stuff is OK, a lot if it is s***.

 

Marketing, marketing, marketing. Nothing wrong with that really, but quite often disingenuous.

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One word for this (and it's a Boston word)... Scrod, means nothing.

Chilean Sea Bass...look it up, means nothing.

Blue Crabs are a species....Sapidus, only one member.

Most of the crab meat you see (all of it from overseas), with pictures of a blue crab on the package, is not blue crab meat. Some of this stuff is OK, a lot if it is s***.

Marketing, marketing, marketing. Nothing wrong with that really, but quite often disingenuous.

 

Most of the crab meat is from the blue Indonesian crab, which looks nothing like a blue claw from here.

 

And a chilean sea bass = a patagonian toothfish

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Most of the crab meat is from the blue Indonesian crab, which looks nothing like a blue claw from here.

And a chilean sea bass = a patagonian toothfish

 

This is not mislabeled. The name was intentionally changed by fishermen in an effort to make it more enticing to consumers.

 

Same with ocean perch (really golden redfish)

Same with alaskan cod (really walleyed pollack)

Same with Boston Bluefish (really pollack)

 

There are lots of other examples.

 

In New England, a charter captain I have fished with called golden redfish "red snappers" and a local NE name for an ocean pout is a conger eel (go figure).

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