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Firinne

bamboo pole

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I picked up 2 old bamboo poles at a flea market this past spring. I was wondering if anyone had any knowledge or expertise on old fishing equipment? One fella told me I only had the top section of an old surf fishing rod, probably used for striper fishing. This section is approximately 8 feet tall with the first set of eyelets about six feet up towards the top of the pole. What is interesting about the eyelets is they are on both sides of the pole, back to back so to speak. They are metal with an orange/red glass lining. There is no seat for a reel, only a metal flange that looks like it would insert into the bottom piece. The 2nd pole I picked up is more or less a boat rod, its 5.5 feet tall with a carved wooden handle. It also has a two sided metal eyelet with the tip eyelet seated on the tip of the rod, like on top of the tip(if you broke of the metal supports the eyelet would slide down the rod like a washer on a bolt)It too has the orange/red glasslike lining in the top eyelet. It also has black decorative tape rings up and down the entire length of the bamboo part. Anyone familiar with these types of rods, their era? I would guess the 40's or 50's

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I can shed a little light, anyway, Bob. The orange / red guide ring inserts are undoubtedly agate - the Hardaloy / S.I.C. insert of it's day - which did much to fight guide grooving but was a quite fragile material, so much so as to make modern inserts seem tough as nails. The back to back guides setup was one of those bright ideas that didn't really play out in the real world. Idea was, as the bamboo took on a "set" or fixed curvature from a lot of usage, the rod shaft was supposed to be turned 180 degrees and fished in that orientation to (theoretically) work out the curve back to a normal, straight shaft. The problem was, most often, the "set" in the shaft proved to be just that; a set, with the bamboo fibres / glue joints crystallized into that orientation. Fishing the reverse curve, far more often than not, brought on almost instant, catastrophic failure of the rod shaft.

 

[This message has been edited by Bill Klein (edited 08-06-2000).]

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Interesting info Bill, what is agate, a stone, a man made material? Interesting theory on the two sided rod guides. Am I close on the time era, 40's or 50's?

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Bob, agate is a naturally occurring semi-precious mineral, in the quartz family; a type of chalcedony which can be highly polished and was quite up to the task of resisting grooving by the lines of the time. I'm not really a collector, or all that much of a tackle historian; 40's to 50's is certainly possible, although I imagine they could be significantly older than that. Fibreglass blanks came on the scene right after WWII and all but ruled the roost by the mid fifties, anyway. On the agates, I can actually remember having a Garcia Fishing Annual from '59 - '60 or thereabouts which cataloged one the more premium Conlon rod series as featuring agate guides on some of the models.

 

 

[This message has been edited by Bill Klein (edited 08-06-2000).]

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