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TonyAngels

Fishing tins?

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Ok guys this is my first year fishing the surf and so far I have yet to land my first striper. I have been lucky once or twice with bluefish on lures and killed it fishing blues on bait now don't get me wrong I love reeling in fish but now I really want to lean. I just finished the art of surf casting with lures and wow what an amazing read. One thing I learned from that book was that I need to be confident in my lures so what I would like to do is learn all I can about fishing tins. I want to learn and practice fishing tins and make tins my main focus while experimenting with other lures. Thanks to the point Jude black knight lures I now learned that I can fish tins both in the day and at night. I have many questions my main one being to ask for any tips on fishing tins? What kind of tins I should get to start with right now I just have some diamond jigs? Where to fish them how to fish them? The weight of the lures as in what weight to use for calm, moderate, and nasty surf conditions? And I also heard of a keeled tin. What is a keeled tin? And I read it keeps the lure off the bottom. So how and when should I fish these types of lures over the other non keeled? I know these are a ton of questions I'm just really looking for a good start to get myself going on becoming comfortable with tins and making tins the main focal lures that I will always feel comfortable fishing. Also if anyone has any books about fishing tins I would greatly appreciate it if they could post the author and title in this thread for me thanks and again sorry for all the questions but if anyone can even answer one or some any info will help me get a start on my tin fishing journey if it helps at all I fish the south shore of long island around Robert Moses field 2, cap tree bridge, soar thumb etc

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A keeled tin will swim higher in the water column as it rides like a little boat. Here are some examples.

 

These would imitate a medium profiled baitfish like a mullet or small mackeral

 

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Here are some oval keeled metals that would imitate butterfish or peanut bunker.

 

p><p>  <a href=http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1663247/width/1000/height/500' alt='500'>

 

Fishing tins is a valuable method of attaining success in our sport.When possible "match the hatch".....choose a tin whose profile resembles the bait that is around at the time. Often overlooked and employed only in "blitzes", metals can cast through a stiff wind when larger plugs won't cut it. By the way, when a bluefish or small striper blitz is on, remember that there are often bigger ,lazy, stripers down deep under the surface action waiting for an easy meal to drop down ! A metal lure will get deep where the big fish often are hunting. They will get you the distance you need when the fish are just too far for a wooden or plastic plug. Definately a weapon worth having in your arsenal !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nice summary Joe! I would suggest that you pick up a couple of tins in the 1 1/2 -2 oz range from Joe's first 2 pictures since you already have a couple diamonds.

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I wouldn't venture out without a few Hopkins either, year after year they are solid fish catchers. With all tins always have a few different weights to match the water conditions, rougher surf and/or wind will call for heavier weights.

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And when the Blue fish blitz you can catch them on SS knife handles with a hook on the end. There are times when bucktail on the hook can make a difference.

The trouble with tins is they make you feel like you're a great caster. Often the bass are in close and you just have to get a five inch plastic minnow over the first wave to get them. So you have to spend your nonproductive hours learning to cast everything in your bag.

 

Peace

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If you haven't already, do a search on "metal" and "tins". We have had some very good conversations. There are some guys on here that are very good with theseslures. My last two seasons, were pretty muchtins and bucktails, and I have been very happy with my success.

 

Do the search, it will pay off.

 

good luck

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The tin I have been using for years, is the tin squid. This tin can be rigged with a bucktail, a tube or a single hook for a pork trailer or a swirltail grub. I use Hopkins types too and i like these with a 4" swirltail on the end as well. I like 'em in the 1 1/2 oz to 3 oz range. Of course in fast water or storms, the heavier will work best for me.smile.gif


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As far as I'm concerned, tins are absolutely essential...I think I've caught almost everry essential gamefish species on my resume (both fresh and salt) on tins at one time or another. But I also think there's a time and place for them and believe you shouldn't get stuck with tunnel vision using only tins

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As far as I'm concerned, tins are absolutely essential...I think I've caught almost everry essential gamefish species on my resume (both fresh and salt) on tins at one time or another. But I also think there's a time and place for them and believe you shouldn't get stuck with tunnel vision using only tins

 

I agree Albacized . Our lures are tools to get a job done.....sometimes you need a screwdriver, sometimes a hammer.You don't want to show up at the job without the right tools!;)

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