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how to dissemble your van staal, macguyver style

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disclaimer: the following is for informational purposes only. these are not factory approved methods and should be attempted by a properly skilled person only. i will bear no responsibility if you injure yourself or others and will not be held responsible if you damage your reel.

 

you may damage some of the bearings while removing them so i suggest that you be prepared to buy new ones. the following covers the vs200 - 300 models. if someone would be nice enough to lend me their 100 or 150 just for measuring, so i can expand my thread, not to be taken fully apart i'd really appreciate it

 

i'm gonna show you how to fully take apart your van staal using common household tools. the only thing you may not have is a bench vice which can be bought for less than $30. it is not absolutely necessary but works better than a bunch of c-clamps unless you have friends who dont mind being stabbed in the hands and arms.

 

i'm gonna skip over some stuff lightly cause i'm sure it's in a thread somewhere. first take the drag knob off then take the spool off. you can dissemble the spool by taking the snap ring off the top with a small flathead screwdriver. then push the center shaft out and remove the bearing and seal with a flathead screwdriver. just watch, there may be shims on the bottom of the shaft or on the top retainer seal cover.

 

to remove the line roller take an adjustable wrench or pliers and remove the round nut on the back of the line roller. there are 2 flat surfaces on the nut that will accept an adjustable wrench or pliers. there may be thread lock compound so it may require a little force to get the nut off. now you should be able to push the line roller out. if it does not come out very lightly tap the shaft with a small hammer or other implement and it will come out.

 

now lets take the line roller apart. remove the plastic seal on the shaft. i found a razor blade works really well to pry the cover off. just be careful you dont cut yourself. next using a small screwdriver take the o-ring out. then you'll see a snap ring. if you have snap ring pliers great. if not i found using a flathead micro screwdriver to hold one side of the snap ring and straightened paperclip on the other end will get the ring to compress. while its compressed use the paperclip to wedge the ring up and it will come out. you may have to try several times over and a paperclip may not work. the tip to small scissors may work also. it took me 20 min to get the snap ring out and dont worry if it bends, you can bend it right back.

 

once the snap ring is out we can remove the bearings and shaft from the line roller by putting the rounded nut back on the shaft. use a flathead screwdriver on the flat surface of the line roller shaft to stop it from turning while you put the nut back on. now take a 3/8" washer and put it over the shaft. make sure the washer is centered and use 2 flathead screwdrivers 180 degrees from each other to pry up. you will need to eventually stack 3 washers on to fully get the shaft out

[img=

the pic only shows one screwdriver cause i needed the other hand to take a pic

 

once the shaft is out remove the rounded nut. to remove the bearings you can do 1 of 2 things. if you have a 1/4 inch deep socket you can lay the shaft on top and tap the bearings off. the socket must have the hex almost all the way down . if there is a stop type plate the shaft will hit the plate and the bearings will not come off. i took a 3/8 inch nut and put it on top of a 1/2 nut and tapped the shaft out using a hammer with some gentle taps. you dont have to worry about damaging the threads cause the shaft has a rounded top

p><p>  <a href=[img=

 

lets move on to the side cover. if you have the special wrench great. if not take some 3/4 inch masking tape and make 1 loop around the hex. you only want one layer because more than one will allow for slippage. use a good quality adjustable wrench to tigheten up on the flat spots. wiggle the wrench to see if your on the flat spots. turn the wrench counterclockwise making sure the rotor spins freely to remove the cover. the cheap made in china wrenches have some play in them and will allow the wrench to slip while the crescent brand is made tigher and should not slip. if you feel the wrench starting to slip stop, reposition the wrench and try again. http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1630176/width/1000/height/500]

 

now lets take the bearings out of the side cover. first we have to make a bearing puller. you'll need a 3/8 x 1 1/4 hex head bolt, a 3/8 nut, a 3/8 washer, a 1/2 washer a number 6x1 1/2, 8x 1 1/2 and 10 x 1 1/2 sheet metal screws. thread the nut all the way up the bolt. if you have a drill press drill a hole in the center of the bolt using a 3/32 drill bit, or you can put the bolt in a vice and use a regular drill. the hole does not have to be perfectly centered. drill down about a half inch. next take a hacksaw and cut into the top of the bolt about 5/16 inch down through the center hole you just drilled. then turn the bolt 90 degrees and cut another slot. you should have something that looks like this

[img=http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1630410/width/1000/height/500]

next put the 3/8 washer on the bolt then the 1/2 washer on the bolt. put it through the bearing. then take the number 6 screw and stick it into the handle end of the cover. line the screw up with the hole in the bolt and screw it into the hole in the bolt. tighten it as much as possible. then take the screw out and do the same with the number 8 and 10 screws but leave the number 10 in the bolt. make sure the washers are centered on the cover then with 2 wrenches hold the nut while unscrewing the bolt. the bearing will pop right out. if only the puller pops off, you did not tighten the sheet metal screws enough. try again. the bolt has to expand enough for it to work. [img=

i have only done this to the radial bearing and have not tried it with the other 2 bearings but i'm sure it would work if you got some longer bolts. the bearing can be pressed back in using a socket the same size as the outside diameter of the bearing, i believe 5/8. just use gentle taps and make sure the bearing is level before starting to put it back in.

take the main shaft out using an 8mm wrench to remove the nut and washer then pull the shaft out

 

to remove the main bearing/gear assembly we have to make another tool. if you have a vs 300 you will need a 1 1/4 sink drain pipe. if you have a vs275, 250 or 200 you will need a 3/4" copper pipe coupler. put the pipe in the vice and with a hacksaw go about 1/4" from the end of the pipe and cut almost halfway through. then cut into the face of the pipe. turn the pipe 180 degrees and do the same thing. you should wind up with 2 small tabs about 3/16 inches wide. on the 1 1/4 pipe i had to bend the tabs in slightly, on the 3/4 the tabs must be bent out slightly. check to see if they align with the slots in the lock ring. if they are too wide you can file the tabs down. http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1630540/width/1000/height/500][img=

use a pair of vice grips to grip the pipe, line up the tabs inside the slots and unscrew the lock ring. once the lock ring is out gently pry the whole assembly out and it will pop right out.

 

if your gear is pressed on i do have a way to remove it but i've only done it on crack 300's and there is a good chance you'd damage the whole assembly. besides from what i've heard even if you do get the gear off it will eventually slip when you put it back on. the whole assembly costs upwards of $150 so i suggest sending it back to the company and let them handle it. they will install a whole new assembly that is of the threaded type if you have a bad bearing. generally the older ct and ma made ones have the press on. this is a pic of a pressed on gear. take note that the carrier sits flat up against the gear. if it is a screw on there will be a slight lip under the gear.http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1630565/width/1000/height/500]http://www.stripersonline.com/image/id/1630566/width/1000/height/500' alt='500'>

if you have the threaded type you will need 2 pieces of hdpe plastic or some other type of soft plastic. one needs to be a chunk about 1 inch square by 2 inches long. the other should be about 1 1/4 inch square buy about 1/2 thick. take the 1 inch square plastic and drill a 5/16 hole down the center. the gear should hit the plastic. the other piece will make a holder for the top. take a torch and gently heat the plastic where the gear will sit and the plastic where the top will sit. this makes the plastic slightly easier to mold. take plastic pieces and put them in place then squeeze the whole thing together lengthwise in the vice. the plastic should mold around the gear and the 4 cross piece on top. make sure you heat the plastic separately from the assembly otherwise you could warp the assembly. you dont want to melt the plastic just soften it a hair. go have a few sips of beer and let the thing cool for a few minutes. now with everything still in the vice. take a pair of pliers and hold the molded top section while with another pair turn the gear molded part. CAUTION THE GEAR IS LEFT HANDED. once it breaks loose take the thing out of the vice and the gear will screw right off. then you can gently pry the bearing off with 2 screwdrivers. just a few words of caution. the carrier is made of brass and will bend really easily. dont hit it with a hammer or put too much pressure on it. the plastic may be a little hard to find but a plastic supplier should have it. sorry i dont have pics for the gear removal. i'll try to get some up soon. also i'm working on a generic parts list which should be up soon.

 

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oh yeah one thing i forgot to add is when putting the side cover back on, make sure the pin in the gear lines up with the traverse guide. before screwing the cover on give the rotor about 4 complete turns to make sure the gear spins freely. if you dont do this you before you put the cover on you will have a $750 paperweight that cannot be taken apart

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I do admire the do it yourselfer to make ingenious tools to work on a simple reel. Though as he points out if you do things wrong you can have " $700.00 paperweight " . Not exacty true but I know exaclty what this member means buy this statement.

 

First let me meantion we are working on top end waterproof reels is not for the faint of heart no matter how simple the designe is. The VS being this example.....very simple in design but I will be the first to tell you ....you need the proper tools (both to protect the finish and prevent damage ) to do the job easily and for me professionely. As meantioned in the previous thread , if you screw the sideplate on the Van Stall when the pin on the main gear is not enguaged in the spool crossbar you are goig to have a delemma. Now not as bad as previously meantioned "$700.00 paperweight " It is still a disaster and if you do this in the field your reel is down (back up ).

 

I work on several hundred of these reels a year and I see the very problem come about about twice a month. If the owner has not forced things at a high level I can usually save the day and get you back out there with your baby and waterproof too. Point is Sxxx can go wrong and as meantioned in the previous thead things go wrong. They go bad for me plenty too.....but it's up to me to figure it out and I am pretty damn good at that ( seeing that is my very profession ). Point made Van Staal reels are very siple in design and functional. They are good reels and I do like them.

What they are not good for is owner /customer service. As meantioned ubove.

 

If you do very little service on you own car or house , then I suggest you not tru to service your VS yourself ......not that you will not be suscessfull but even if you are , I hate to see you mare your $700 investment .

 

If you do service your jewel VS yourself and do assemble it incorrectly , don't force things. Send it to me and I gaurentee I can I will save most of it if not all but one part from that mistake.

I will get it back together and you won't be out a fortune :)

 

I have spoken to several people I do service work for on their reels each year . Most would like to take on their service to their equipment themselves and I explain what can go wrong if they do. I am not selling .....I just want people to ejoy the high end investment they purchased . Yes there are those who could care less .

 

I will honestly tell you . If you want a waterproof reel and you want to service it youself ........buy a ZeeBaas if you can aford it . Thet are so easy to service and you really have to try to mess things up.

 

I am not a sales person. I am a technical person ......I think and use devices to the very point of failure or as advertised , then I notate the flaws . Man If I say it works and does it well bellieve me it does . If it does not I don't kill it , I just never talk about it . Waterproof reels are very precise and finicky . All have their flaws and all have their positive points . If you are going to use them to their full potential you the user will realize which has what .

 

From what I see the newest ZeeBaas design is the hands down most user friendly ,user serviced reel on the market period. Zeebaas did their homework and they are still perfecting their design.

 

 

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Honestly I don't know where to begin.

Let 's just say I fully concur with the comments of Occams Razor including admiring your ingenuity with regard to tools-BUT-

 

I would like to point out that the radial bearing on the 200/300 is not pressed into the side cover and will drop out by it's own weight /gravity once you flush the grease/oil out using some sort of cleaning liquid like WD40. Most often in a well cared for reel the radial will slide off on the shaft of the main gear when it is removed from the side cover.

The radial bearing on the 100 series is pressed and would require a puller. I don't see how you would be able to make a tool of sufficiently small diameter to do the radial bearing on the 100 series using your method. The bolt would have to be of a narrower diameter as would the other screws. Drilling out the center of such a narrow bolt would require a lathe or vertical mill etc.

 

The removal of the anti reverse bearing (clutch bearing) and the needle bearing require the servicing person to be aware that there are shoulders or steps in the side cover requiring those parts to be removed from different sides of the cover. Having done this many times I can assure you the "tool" you picture will not work.

 

Marc

 

 

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If your reel has been dissassembled and during reassembly one has not aligned the cross shaft with the main gear drive pin you have likely locked up the reel.

 

Do not force it . I can get your reel opened back up and repaired. If it has not been forced I can likely save all the parts . If it has

the crossbar has major damage from being forced it will have to be replaced . I have been able to save mant exspensive gear

sets so I will need to see how things look.

 

Anyhow if you need help I would be glad to help you . Drop me a PM and I will contact you and we can arrange a meet or you

can send it if you are not close . These reels are never paperweights ! You just have to have patience and expertise. Its all

good ......and I learned the hard way myself with my own over a decade back . That is how I perfected a way to get them open without major issues.

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I have been working on my paperweight and have got fairly close to fixing it. I took the rotor off and removed the pinion gear and bearing.  that gave me a little more wiggle room but not enough. This is a newer reel and the few people I talked to said its a little more difficult than the older ones. 



I turned the shaft till the nut backed off(it actually stripped the threads). That still didn't give me enough room to back the side plate off so I took a drive pin and put it on the crossbar and broke it. 



Side plate came right off. End result is two damaged parts that need to be replaced. I hope to have parts in tomorrow and be fishing the reel by the weekend. 



 



Occams Razor,



 Thank you very much for the offer. I would have taken you up on it if I wasn't so impatient. Also since I never post I can not send PM. 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 


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No problem at all. I see this happen all the time and it the # 1 cause of a VS being down and the next is sheer neglect.

 

Pulling the rotor it a good idea for the simple reason when you are wrenching against the clutch alot of times you will scratch the rotor.

 

When I get a VS that is locked up I pull the rotor and handle off first thing and have a special derlin die machined to sit the body into to hold it while I work the sideplate

 

very carefully not to do anymore damage than is already done. I have save all but two dinged up gearsets and many crossbars. Some of the crossbars are really mangled and cause

 

damage to the pin on the main gear as well. The VS is a very simple reel and as you have found out it is very simple to get things amock too !

 

When I was able to do a service on the very first ZeeBaas I was glad to see things had drasticly changed and was much easier for folks with gereral knowledge to take down and

 

servive themselves and not worry about that whole issue. Thing I see mostly with the Zs is folks nip the O rings during assemble and they get water intrusion.

 

Glad you were able to thing taken care off. Word of advice. Next time when you assemble , take the main gear out of its support housing and plug it rite into the crossbar, Gently lower the

 

sideplate housing down and as soon as the maingear shaft it through the housing put your thumb down and it and hold it solidly down and with your free hand screw the sideplate all the

 

down . You will not have you issue if you do that every time ;)

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to press the bearings back on use the socket and gently tap the bearings back on. going this way the stop in the socket wont matter because the shaft is smaller and not as deep

 

orm8tt.jpg

Never tap bearings on the outer race . There is going to be a lot of damage .Ball will  leave a mark on both race .Bearing is pressed always by gentle tap on inner  race . 

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I do admire the do it yourselfer to make ingenious tools to work on a simple reel. Though as he points out if you do things wrong you can have " $700.00 paperweight " . Not exacty true but I know exaclty what this member means buy this statement.

 

First let me meantion we are working on top end waterproof reels is not for the faint of heart no matter how simple the designe is. The VS being this example.....very simple in design but I will be the first to tell you ....you need the proper tools (both to protect the finish and prevent damage ) to do the job easily and for me professionely. As meantioned in the previous thread , if you screw the sideplate on the Van Stall when the pin on the main gear is not enguaged in the spool crossbar you are goig to have a delemma. Now not as bad as previously meantioned "$700.00 paperweight " It is still a disaster and if you do this in the field your reel is down (back up ).

 

I work on several hundred of these reels a year and I see the very problem come about about twice a month. If the owner has not forced things at a high level I can usually save the day and get you back out there with your baby and waterproof too. Point is Sxxx can go wrong and as meantioned in the previous thead things go wrong. They go bad for me plenty too.....but it's up to me to figure it out and I am pretty damn good at that ( seeing that is my very profession ). Point made Van Staal reels are very siple in design and functional. They are good reels and I do like them.

What they are not good for is owner /customer service. As meantioned ubove.

 

If you do very little service on you own car or house , then I suggest you not tru to service your VS yourself ......not that you will not be suscessfull but even if you are , I hate to see you mare your $700 investment .

 

If you do service your jewel VS yourself and do assemble it incorrectly , don't force things. Send it to me and I gaurentee I can I will save most of it if not all but one part from that mistake.

I will get it back together and you won't be out a fortune :)

 

I have spoken to several people I do service work for on their reels each year . Most would like to take on their service to their equipment themselves and I explain what can go wrong if they do. I am not selling .....I just want people to ejoy the high end investment they purchased . Yes there are those who could care less .

 

I will honestly tell you . If you want a waterproof reel and you want to service it youself ........buy a ZeeBaas if you can aford it . Thet are so easy to service and you really have to try to mess things up.

 

I am not a sales person. I am a technical person ......I think and use devices to the very point of failure or as advertised , then I notate the flaws . Man If I say it works and does it well bellieve me it does . If it does not I don't kill it , I just never talk about it . Waterproof reels are very precise and finicky . All have their flaws and all have their positive points . If you are going to use them to their full potential you the user will realize which has what .

 

From what I see the newest ZeeBaas design is the hands down most user friendly ,user serviced reel on the market period. Zeebaas did their homework and they are still perfecting their design.

 

"First let me meantion we are working on top end waterproof reels is not for the faint of heart no matter how simple the designe is. The VS being this example.....very simple in design but I will be the first to tell you ....you need the proper tools (both to protect the finish and prevent damage ) to do the job easily and for me professionely. As meantioned in the previous thread , if you screw the sideplate on the Van Stall when the pin on the main gear is not enguaged in the spool crossbar you are goig to have a delemma. Now not as bad as previously meantioned "$700.00 paperweight " It is still a disaster and if you do this in the field your reel is down (back up )."

 

"I will honestly tell you . If you want a waterproof reel and you want to service it youself ........buy a ZeeBaas if you can aford it . Thet are so easy to service and you really have to try to mess things up."

 

"From what I see the newest ZeeBaas design is the hands down most user friendly ,user serviced reel on the market period. Zeebaas did their homework and they are still perfecting their design."

 

You conclusions match my independently derived conclusions having viewed all the self-service videos for both the VS and ZB. *IF* I had the money and actually needed such a reel the ZB is a no-brainer.

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