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Catch Shares coming to the rec fishery

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Disturbing:

 

Gloucester Daily Times

October 28, 2010 By Richard Gaines Staff Writer The Gloucester Daily Times Thu Oct 28, 2010, 11:12 PM EDT

 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental Defense Fund have separately announced efforts to regulate the nation's recreational fishing operations under the same type of catch-share system now being used to manage New England's commercial fisheries.

The government effort at transforming the recreational sector into a limited-access, regulated market comes on the heels of a bitterly divisive campaign by Jane Lubchenco, the Obama administration's chief of oceans and atmosphere and a former EDF official, to bring New England's commercial fisheries under catch share management.

NOAA and EDF both assert there is stakeholder support for recreational catch shares, which would, in part, assign allocations to charter boat companies and captains.

But the Recreational Fishing Alliance, a leading membership-based organization of non-commercial fishermen, is fiercely opposing the expansion of catch shares into recreational markets.

"We've said all along that EDF and Pew (the Pew Environment Group, a investor in EDF) weren't going to be satisfied with just putting 'open access' commercial fisheries under catch share rule," said RFA Executive Director Jim Donofrio. "Now we see where this is headed, right into the heart of our sector."

The catch share system was put in place in New England's groundfishery last May, and has resulted in rapid consolidation in conjunction with catch limits set by Lubchenco's NOAA Fisheries, reducing the productivity of the Massachusetts fishery by $21 million and costing the regional industry an $38 million in opportunity, according to figures released Thursday by the administration of Gov. Deval Patrick.

The governor and the state's congressional delegation won the commitment of U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke to consider ordering emergency increases in the allocations of groundfish to obviate a demonstrated economic need.

Paul Diodati, director of marine fisheries for Massachusetts, was scheduled to brief Eric Schwaab, Lubchenco's NOAA Fisheries administrator, today on research generated primarily from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth's School of Marine Technology in the days after Locke acknowledged his authority to alter the catch limits.

The full report will be delivered to Locke next week, said Patrick spokesman Bob Keough.

NOAA's announcement this week of the "action agenda" for the recreational fisheries did not mention catch shares, but the direction the Obama administration is heading was embedded into the agenda itself in various places. The regulated commodities market imagined by the document requires aggressive data gathering.

The policy paper anticipates the need to "address recreational concerns/comments on allocations (and other issues) in NOAA catch share policy, as appropriate."

To improve the "understanding of human dimensions of recreational fishing," the NOAA document reads, it will be necessary to for government scientists and officials along with "social scientists and outside specialists (to prepare) a research agenda on human dimensions of marine recreational fishing,"

EDF launched its recreational catch share campaign in a private workshop for selected invited guests from the recreational sector in Jackson Hole, Wyo., on Oct. 21-22. The RFA reported on the meeting in a release the day be it opened.

EDF has adopted the idea of catch shares as a remedy for the ailments of the fisheries, while, at the same time, promoting it as an undeveloped investor market that could produce windfall profits in excess of 400 percent for investments made while the markets are in formation.

"Catch shares will allow ownership of our public resources to a handful of venture capitalists. But whether or not those shareholders actually share with anglers is not up to us to decide," said Dinofrio.

EDF was lead sponsor of a policy blueprint for catch shares in 2008, just as President Obama was preparing to take office. He nominated Lubchenco to head NOAA after she participated in the working group of like-minded scientists and former politicians that urged the incoming president and Congress to solve the overfishing problem and restore the oceans by converting the fisheries into catch shares.

In a statement to the Times, Don Barry, managing director for the EDF Oceans Program, said, "EDF believes in seeking out the views and opinions of recreational fishermen since we share the same goals of ensuring a vibrant recreational fishing community and recreational fishing experience. EDF does not believe that catch shares is an appropriate management system for private anglers."

"We do believe, however, that future access for charter boats and head boats is threatened by failed management practices and a 'business as usual' approach," Barry said. "Last week's meeting was one among many in which EDF has reached out to fishermen to better understand their concerns and discuss potential solutions, including catch shares, that work to improve fishermen's access and catches as well as recover fish populations."

Richard Gaines can be reached at 978-283-7000, x3464, or at rgaines@gloucestertimes.com.

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View PostDisturbing:

 

 

Gloucester Daily Times

 

October 28, 2010 By Richard Gaines Staff Writer The Gloucester Daily Times Thu Oct 28, 2010, 11:12 PM EDT

 

 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Environmental Defense Fund have separately announced efforts to regulate the nation's recreational fishing operations under the same type of catch-share system now being used to manage New England's commercial fisheries.

 

The government effort at transforming the recreational sector into a limited-access, regulated market comes on the heels of a bitterly divisive campaign by Jane Lubchenco, the Obama administration's chief of oceans and atmosphere and a former EDF official, to bring New England's commercial fisheries under catch share management.

 

NOAA and EDF both assert there is stakeholder support for recreational catch shares, which would, in part, assign allocations to charter boat companies and captains.

 

But the Recreational Fishing Alliance, a leading membership-based organization of non-commercial fishermen, is fiercely opposing the expansion of catch shares into recreational markets.

 

"We've said all along that EDF and Pew (the Pew Environment Group, a investor in EDF) weren't going to be satisfied with just putting 'open access' commercial fisheries under catch share rule," said RFA Executive Director Jim Donofrio. "Now we see where this is headed, right into the heart of our sector."

 

The catch share system was put in place in New England's groundfishery last May, and has resulted in rapid consolidation in conjunction with catch limits set by Lubchenco's NOAA Fisheries, reducing the productivity of the Massachusetts fishery by $21 million and costing the regional industry an $38 million in opportunity, according to figures released Thursday by the administration of Gov. Deval Patrick.

 

The governor and the state's congressional delegation won the commitment of U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke to consider ordering emergency increases in the allocations of groundfish to obviate a demonstrated economic need.

 

Paul Diodati, director of marine fisheries for Massachusetts, was scheduled to brief Eric Schwaab, Lubchenco's NOAA Fisheries administrator, today on research generated primarily from the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth's School of Marine Technology in the days after Locke acknowledged his authority to alter the catch limits.

 

The full report will be delivered to Locke next week, said Patrick spokesman Bob Keough.

 

NOAA's announcement this week of the "action agenda" for the recreational fisheries did not mention catch shares, but the direction the Obama administration is heading was embedded into the agenda itself in various places. The regulated commodities market imagined by the document requires aggressive data gathering.

 

The policy paper anticipates the need to "address recreational concerns/comments on allocations (and other issues) in NOAA catch share policy, as appropriate."

 

To improve the "understanding of human dimensions of recreational fishing," the NOAA document reads, it will be necessary to for government scientists and officials along with "social scientists and outside specialists (to prepare) a research agenda on human dimensions of marine recreational fishing,"

 

EDF launched its recreational catch share campaign in a private workshop for selected invited guests from the recreational sector in Jackson Hole, Wyo., on Oct. 21-22. The RFA reported on the meeting in a release the day be it opened.

 

EDF has adopted the idea of catch shares as a remedy for the ailments of the fisheries, while, at the same time, promoting it as an undeveloped investor market that could produce windfall profits in excess of 400 percent for investments made while the markets are in formation.

 

"Catch shares will allow ownership of our public resources to a handful of venture capitalists. But whether or not those shareholders actually share with anglers is not up to us to decide," said Dinofrio.

 

EDF was lead sponsor of a policy blueprint for catch shares in 2008, just as President Obama was preparing to take office. He nominated Lubchenco to head NOAA after she participated in the working group of like-minded scientists and former politicians that urged the incoming president and Congress to solve the overfishing problem and restore the oceans by converting the fisheries into catch shares.

 

In a statement to the Times, Don Barry, managing director for the EDF Oceans Program, said, "EDF believes in seeking out the views and opinions of recreational fishermen since we share the same goals of ensuring a vibrant recreational fishing community and recreational fishing experience. EDF does not believe that catch shares is an appropriate management system for private anglers."

 

"We do believe, however, that future access for charter boats and head boats is threatened by failed management practices and a 'business as usual' approach," Barry said. "Last week's meeting was one among many in which EDF has reached out to fishermen to better understand their concerns and discuss potential solutions, including catch shares, that work to improve fishermen's access and catches as well as recover fish populations."

 

Richard Gaines can be reached at 978-283-7000, x3464, or at rgaines@gloucestertimes.com.

 

kooky.gif

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Jeff, crazy is the last thing I'd label this group as.

 

Whacko's, devious, underhanded...the list goes on - is more appropriate.

 

While on the relative bottom of my list, its yet another reason to make a major change tuesday.

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View PostJeff, crazy is the last thing I'd label this group as.

 

 

Whacko's, devious, underhanded...the list goes on - is more appropriate.

 

 

While on the relative bottom of my list, its yet another reason to make a major change tuesday.

 

I think the plan is crazy. Those trying to implement it are not crazy, they are very determined and very evil.

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