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BrianBM

Blind casting Makos (or any hefty reel)

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I was reviewing the best-reel thread again, for ideas that might be worth exploring, and it occurred to me that 1) Formula 1 is our leading Mako buff, and 2) his fishing seems largely to be sight casting, for tarpon, tuna, and sharks. Would you want a Mako for your fly angling if it involved blind casting all day?

 

Hairy Nosed Wombat (if he's on a dating site, he probably has a different handle) remarked both on the relatively small importance of reel weight for sight fishing, and the advantage of light weight and a big arbor for sustained casting. The one complaint that anyone's ever made in my hearing about the Makos is their weight. For big game, the weight's irrelevant because you're casting only to fish in sight. Formula1 is a fiend for training; he's mentioned his gym routine several times, which includes plenty of free weights and push ups on his tongue. I suspect that anglers who pursue big fish so steadily are all gym rats. So, for their fishing, weight doesn't matter. But what if you need to lay out casts all day? Would you still want a Mako? The Billy Pates are hefty, too, as I recall. Local66, may I infer from your posts that you do more walking and watching then casting?

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Just like jigging the ditch, it isn't something you're going to start doing on day one, but if you keep up with it, and with a little added gym time, you'll be double hauling a louisville slugger all day long.

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View PostTry vertical jigging 400g all day.

It makes casting a 10wt with a Mako on it seem like a breeze. moon.gif

 

I've done plenty of vertical jigging too...only way to get tuna if they're too deep for a fly rod...

 

Just work out more...and like likwid says, no problemo. The reel (pun intended) isn't the casting, it's the catching when you finally hook up with that tuna. My friend that I fish with all the time landed a BFT around 200# last year on spin gear with 50# braid - we didn't move the boat till the last 10 minutes of the fight and that was cause it was getting dark - took a timed 3 hours 15 minutes to land that fish including pumping it all the way back in. I was laughing my butt off at him the whole time (we love to see each other physically punished by fish).

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View PostAh. So you'd take your Makos for sustained casting, too, and just do more curls in the off season?

 

I do sustained casting with whatever I need to...but when it comes to really big fly rod fish they are almost never caught blind casting so there's no point in blind casting a 9600 or 9700. There are some fish that blind casting a 9500 is a realistic scenario and I have no problem doing that. I used to cast 12 wts all day long...but the fishing I do now has no need for that so I don't bother...

 

And I do curls during the season too...my workouts never stop year round. The routines just go into different phases depending on what time of the year we are at.

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View PostThere are some fish that blind casting a 9500 is a realistic scenario and I have no problem doing that.

 

9550 in the Cape Cod Canal.

 

 

vertical jigging + 20lbs of drag = sleep well that night. biggrin.gif

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on my 12wt was tad too much for my bad wrist in my present state of decline (65). I downsized to a Gulf Stream and was back in the game while sight fishing for tarpon.

 

I now use the Pacific for bill fish and tuna. BTW you don't have to cast to tuna in some circumstances, merely dump your heavy sinking line by bouncing the rod tip until you reach the fish.

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No criticism of anyone who does so, but in that situation I'd fish with a conventional tackle and a jig.

 

One taste I will never share with Formula1 is his desire for a workout from his fish. I am quite happy to not be exhausted by the time the angling day is done; I'll be tired, and that's fine (but not the same). Ted Williams' excellent "Fishing the Big Three" has an excellent discussion of using substantial tackle to avoid exhausting either the fish or the angler. His rule of thumb was that a fish that's on the line more then 15 minutes is more work then fun, and I'm minded to agree. [That book is out in a new paperback edition and you should pick it up, if you can.]

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With all due respect to Mr. Williams, heavier tackle does not necessarily save on exhaustion on the angler - very light tackle actually saves on exhausting the angler at the expense of a fish. It's simple physics. For example, an 8 wt rod can only pull so hard on a fish before breaking unless you are straightlining the fish - almost anyone can pull hard enough to easily break an 8 wt. Try the same with a 17 wt and most people cannot pull hard enough to break it, but it *will* allow them to pull hard. I've measured the pull at the foregrip - when I'm deadlifting 20 lb plus I am putting 80-120 lb. of force at the foregrip depending on the angle. An 8 wt is limited to deadlifting 4-5 lb and you are only putting 16 to 30 lb of force at the foregrip. Now you tell me, what is going to exhaust you, pulling 80-120 lb of force or pulling 16-30 lb of force?

 

Some buddies of mine landed a monster thresher shark a couple of months ago off the West Coast - at one point, 2 hours into the fight, on 100# gsp, the angler was pulling on that thresher with all his strength (cause he wasn't going to break the rod or line) and that shark did not budge for 20 minutes even with trying to work the angles on the fish. And this guy is a big, strong guy...young and in shape. You want to guess how tired my buddy was after pulling on that thresher for nearly 4 hours on 100# stand up gear? If he'd been fighting a 30# fish on 4 lb. tackle for 8 hours I bet he'd be fresh as a daisy but the fish would be dead of exhaustion...

 

Also, it's not a workout I'm looking for from a fish...it's a fight. I've never been into "playing" a fish, I'm into "fighting" a fish.

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View PostNo criticism of anyone who does so, but in that situation I'd fish with a conventional tackle and a jig.

 

.]

 

 

My knee jerk reaction is to agree with you. However, I often dredge the bottom for stripers with heavy sinking heads. Isn't this just a big game version of the same thing?

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As long as you're casting, you're casting. Merely feeding out line would bug me.

 

The particular pleasure of sticking a fish on the fly, for me, has a lot to do with the directness of the connection. Feeding out line and waiting for a pull would bore me. (So do exercises like wire-line trolling in a rip for stripers. I've done it once or twice and have no desire to do it again.).

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