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Tackle for Steelhead At Salmon River

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I've been up to Pulaski a few times for the Salmon run and always used spinning gear.I'm headed up there soon to do some Steelhead fishing and was wondering what kind of Fly gear I'll need.I have an 8 and 10 weight rod .What kind of line, leaders and flies should I be bringing.Any other info is appreciated.Thanks

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I recommend the 8 wt. I've seen plenty of 10's (weight rods) up there. Just seems very overkill to me. Most people use straight running line and rig-up for "chuck & duck". You can also use traditional WF/DT fly line. You would need to use (law) traditional fly line in the fly fishing only section.

 

You can swing with traditional fly line, dead drift or 'indy' fish.

 

For leaders I would go similar to what you do for your spinning tackle. Your trying to accomplish the same thing, just using fly gear. I often go as low as 6# and rarely heaviest than 12# for tippet. The base portion of a leader can be 18#. I recommend a break from the fly to the weight.

 

Flies:

Eggs (estaz or other)

If your comfortable with egg sacs & float, you could do that.

I like a prince nymph (BH)

Stoneflies

woolly bugger for swinging

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Ive found that the WT of the rod is less important than the length.. I like a 10ft MINIMUM length for steelhead just because you'll be mostly nymphing them.. I used to use a 10ft 7wt rod for years and recently went to spey rods.. the advantages of using spey rods are huge.. you dont have to strip so #1, your guides dont ice up #2, you can wear big warm gloves so your hands dont get cold.. in addition, my spey rods are 13.5 ft in length, the extra length helps you mend easier in faster water.

 

as for flies for steelhead, you can catch a ton of fish by using only egg patterns and stone flies.. think size 12 stone flies balck with red/pink. chartruesse etc.. think egg patterns with estaz, orange, blue, green, pink, and you'll catch enough fish..

 

BC

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View PostIve found that the WT of the rod is less important than the length.. I like a 10ft MINIMUM length for steelhead just because you'll be mostly nymphing them.. I used to use a 10ft 7wt rod for years and recently went to spey rods.. the advantages of using spey rods are huge.. you dont have to strip so #1, your guides dont ice up #2, you can wear big warm gloves so your hands dont get cold.. in addition, my spey rods are 13.5 ft in length, the extra length helps you mend easier in faster water.

 

as for flies for steelhead, you can catch a ton of fish by using only egg patterns and stone flies.. think size 12 stone flies balck with red/pink. chartruesse etc.. think egg patterns with estaz, orange, blue, green, pink, and you'll catch enough fish..

 

BC

 

I use a switch, you do get iced up guides, but it has so many uses!!

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10' 7 wt is the best size for single hand rods for Pulaski steel, IMO. Some of the smaller creeks a 10' or 9'6 6wt is nice but for the Salmon go bigger like a 7 or 8 wt. Sink tips are nice for swinging flies but I'd stick with a floater for all around use. Green caddis, black stonefly, and egg patterns are what most people use but don't be afraid to toss an olive wooly bugger or big black leech.

 

For rods I like any Sage, tcx or z-axis are favs, the 99 rods look nice and so does the new vxp, and redington makes a nice 10' rod too. The make is not important. The size, weight and feel are most important to me. You're probably only going to use it a few times a year so go with a rod that you can afford and have fun fishing with.

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8wt is probably the best all around 1h fly rod for the river. it has enough back bone to handle kings in october and its delicate enough to handle the 4/6lb tippets used in the winter for steelhead, not to mention its light enough to toss all day long. 1500roll casts in a day is tough on the arm/back.

 

that being said, if you are just looking for a steelhead rod than a 7wt would be the best choice for that river.

 

what i look for in my salmon river fly rods:

- a lifetime warranty. rods break up there often, you want that lifetime warranty for 25$ or similiar cost

- a delicate tip. you need to feel taps on the bottom and when fish take.

 

i'd agree with the previous poster that in the salmon river, where roll casts are king, the extra length in the rod is very helpful. i fish 9'6 rods, 10' are great also.

 

try a Temple Fork - Lefty Kreh Professional Series 9'6 8wt rod. put on a Lamson Guru reel and enjoy.

 

if you are willing to spend some more $. the Gloomis NativeRun GLX 9'6 8wt has the softest tip i've seen in that size rod and is simply amazing. stick on a lamson velocity hard alox 3.5x reel and go slay a dragon.

 

~J

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Wouldn't you be better with a lighter fly line for bottom bouncing? Wouldn't a lighter fly line put less drag on your leader to allow your fly to have a better drift?

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View PostWouldn't you be better with a lighter fly line for bottom bouncing? Wouldn't a lighter fly line put less drag on your leader to allow your fly to have a better drift?

 

 

That's why some guys are suggesting the running line like a Cortland 20 lb running line.

 

For any steelhead rod you want a medium to medium fast action with a soft tip for tippet protection. You often go very light in clear water and the hit from a good sized steelhead will snap your tippet.

 

I would second a 10' 7wt as the best single hand flyrod to use. The Scott A2's (not sure if they still make them) were great rods. Remember if you are not swinging flies or fishing low water you are often throwing lots of weight on the leader so a great casting rod is not really needed.

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View PostWouldn't you be better with a lighter fly line for bottom bouncing? Wouldn't a lighter fly line put less drag on your leader to allow your fly to have a better drift?

 

-------------

 

if you are strictly going to bottom bounce or chuck and duck as we call it, then yes, a .30 or .32 diameter running line is perfect.. I like orange so you can see it in the water better.. some people use double taper 5-6 wt floating lines so you can mend down stream, but it does take some xtra weight to keep the fly in the bottom.. but for pure chuck and duck, I like a 10ft, 7wt rod, with a length of 9-10 ft tapered flouro line (10lb test) tied to a micro swivel and 4 ft of 4 or 6 lb cold water flouro.. Drennen IMO is the best tipper material for the river. I suppose any flouro will do in the warmer months (up to Oct/nov) but after that, drennen is king!!

 

BC

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View Post-------------

 

if you are strictly going to bottom bounce or chuck and duck as we call it, then yes, a .30 or .32 diameter running line is perfect.. I like orange so you can see it in the water better.. some people use double taper 5-6 wt floating lines so you can mend down stream, but it does take some xtra weight to keep the fly in the bottom.. but for pure chuck and duck, I like a 10ft, 7wt rod, with a length of 9-10 ft tapered flouro line (10lb test) tied to a micro swivel and 4 ft of 4 or 6 lb cold water flouro.. Drennen IMO is the best tipper material for the river. I suppose any flouro will do in the warmer months (up to Oct/nov) but after that, drennen is king!!

 

BC

 

Why is such a long leader necessary? I was using like 5 feet of 20lb flouro to a micro swivel and then 4 ft of 8lb flouro.

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AJ, whichever way you end up fishing I hope you have a ball.

 

My pal from Delaware took me up there around Thanksgiving 2005. The guide let me do the nymph thing first and when I hooked a steelhead I played it like I would a a rainbow here in Scotland........which was fine until it went under the boat and I plunged the rod tip in the water!! I don't know if it's common practice to use certain old anglo-saxon phrases to your client, but he used loads of them!! cwm27.gif

 

I tried to explain that we do the rod beneath the boat thing whenever a fish runs under the keel but he was having none of it. Even when I explained that I have the same sage rods at home he provided me with on the day, I knew I was never gonna placate him, so I lifted the rod and lost the fish.mad.gif

 

We went to chuck and duck after that and landed 6 or 7 for our day.

 

Have to say that I'm envious of your forthcoming trip.

 

Tight lines

 

Phil

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