Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
buz23

Drag Grease Question

Rate this topic

8 posts in this topic

OK, so I just got back from MV and caught my PB striper (44"). The reel I was using that day is a Cardinal 806, about 3 years old, not my go-to reel so it has sat a long time between serious uses. The drag was so sticky that I had to loosen it up and palm the spool by hand to get the big girl safely in.

 

When I got home, with thanks to instructions on this site, I disassembled the drag stackup and found that saltwater had made its way in (to the supposedly waterproof drag) and had corroded the aluminum spool, and there was aluminum oxide "fluff" on the carbon fiber drag washers, etc. I cleaned it all up and reassembled and it is smooth again.

 

I only fish about 3 times a year (a week at a time on MV, so don't feel too sorry for me) and usually I just rinse the reels off with tap water and let them dry. I think some more serious maintenance is in order, at least to keep the drags smooth.

 

I see where drag grease is used sometimes. How much do I need to apply? Is it used for friction between the drag washers or should I use enough to prevent the aluminum spool from corroding?

 

I would appreciate some guidance. I think I can find drag grease (elsewhere on this site Cal's is recommended).

 

Thanks.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea Cal's grease is what you want. It can be used anywhere in your reel, it's just that other higher speed oils (like Corrosion-X) are better for things like roller bearings or the spool shaft etc. or marine grease for things that don't have a lot of need for rapid turning and just need protection.

 

When you apply it to your totally cleaned drag washers (take them out and soak them first in plain water to get out the salt, then carb cleaner to get any grease out) put on plenty to totally soak the washers. Then with a clean rag, wipe off all that you can after it has had a chance to soak in a bit. Don't worry about too much, once you crank down the drag it will squeeze out any excess and liberally coat all surfaces in there, then run out the bottom. But all they need left on the surface before you put it back together is enough to leave a thumb print.

 

The idea is that the grease will reduce "start up" friction and protect everything in there from salt in the future or from salt water soaking into the drag washers. It basically makes the smoothest possible longest lasting drag known.

 

Given the amount of salt you found in the spool it might be worth opening up the reel body to nip any impending problems in there in the bud.wink.gif

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ps: the reason you want Cal's or other specifically designed for drags grease (Shimano, Penn etc) is that they are teflon based and heat resistant. Consequently when you get that "smokin' run" actually there is no smoke and the grease does not lose it's properties.

 

It's not quite as durable as Marine Bearing grease for long term protection (on gears and bearings) nor as fast as lite synthetic oils (roller bearings, oscillating shaft) that also do not "gum up" those parts over time. But according to Cal Sheets West Coast Reel guru it will not hurt any part of your reel.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because it's problem to me,where to get the right grease for the drag,

J wonder , can J try this Thermal grease ....kooky.gif

 

some word about thermal grease from wikipedia

 

ceramic-based thermal grease has generally good thermal conductivity and is usually composed of a ceramic powder suspended in a liquid or gelatinous silicone compound, which may be described as 'silicone paste' or 'silicone thermal compound'. The most commonly used ceramics and their thermal conductivities (in units of W/(m ·K)) are: [1] beryllium oxide (218), aluminum nitride (170), aluminum oxide (39), zinc oxide (21), and silicon dioxide (1). Thermal grease is usually white in colour since these ceramics are all white in powder form.usually use silicone grease as a medium, a heat conductor in itself, though some manufacturers prefer use of fractions of mineral oil

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could care less about greasing washers for drag performance. I don't have any need to do that, except for felt type discs like some of the old shimano's.

 

I want grease inside to stop corrosion in between the last disc and the spool on a spinning reel and between the last disc and main gear on a conventional or casting reel. These are the areas where salt will accumulate and eat as the OP reports. Any grease will work. I chose Tani's advice for Blue Yamaha Grease. Works great.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostBecause it's problem to me,where to get the right grease for the drag,

J wonder , can J try this Thermal grease ....kooky.gif

 

some word about thermal grease from wikipedia

 

ceramic-based thermal grease has generally good thermal conductivity and is usually composed of a ceramic powder suspended in a liquid or gelatinous silicone compound, which may be described as 'silicone paste' or 'silicone thermal compound'. The most commonly used ceramics and their thermal conductivities (in units of W/(m ·K)) are: [1] beryllium oxide (218), aluminum nitride (170), aluminum oxide (39), zinc oxide (21), and silicon dioxide (1). Thermal grease is usually white in colour since these ceramics are all white in powder form.usually use silicone grease as a medium, a heat conductor in itself, though some manufacturers prefer use of fractions of mineral oil

 

Thermal Grease IS NOT FOR FISHING REELS. Thermal grease is used for seating a Fan on the Heat Sink of a CPU of a PC for example. They are not Lubricants but are used to efficiently transfer heat.

 

Teflon based Drag greases are available from Shimano, Penn, Fisherman, Cal Sheets and others.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just thought that maybe it is possible to put in drag washers, just for the characteristics of transmitting heat, and the silicone grease is a medium.... Ok highfive.gif

 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostOK, so I just got back from MV and caught my PB striper (44"). The reel I was using that day is a Cardinal 806, about 3 years old, not my go-to reel so it has sat a long time between serious uses. The drag was so sticky that I had to loosen it up and palm the spool by hand to get the big girl safely in.

 

When I got home, with thanks to instructions on this site, I disassembled the drag stackup and found that saltwater had made its way in (to the supposedly waterproof drag) and had corroded the aluminum spool, and there was aluminum oxide "fluff" on the carbon fiber drag washers, etc. I cleaned it all up and reassembled and it is smooth again.

 

I only fish about 3 times a year (a week at a time on MV, so don't feel too sorry for me) and usually I just rinse the reels off with tap water and let them dry. I think some more serious maintenance is in order, at least to keep the drags smooth.

 

I see where drag grease is used sometimes. How much do I need to apply? Is it used for friction between the drag washers or should I use enough to prevent the aluminum spool from corroding?

 

I would appreciate some guidance. I think I can find drag grease (elsewhere on this site Cal's is recommended).

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

BUZ, I hate to tell you this, but, you created your own problem. Saltwater is not the only "chloride" water.

 

Sodium chloride is the main salt in salt water.

 

Drinking water has many chlorides added to make water palatable, aluminum chloride, magnesium chloride, potassium chloride are some put into drinking (tap) water.

 

The only water without clorides (salts) in it is distilled water.

 

Yes, there is less total clorides in tap water, but it is still there.

 

Whenever you put your tackle away for a known period of time, lube it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.