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finger mullet

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hi all

first of all I personally haven't see finger mullet in

mass schools in years where i am.We get a few scattered pods

then the storms come and they are gone.

finger mullet when alive are mostly silver maybe

a tint of color on its back.

when they are dead they get that dark blue back.

i remember i was fishing with small super strike poppers blue and white

and green and white the mullet where in full force

with small bass on them.

they wouldn't touch those plugs for some reason.

An old timer passed by and stopped threw out a popper

and then slaughter the bass with it.

A nice guy he gave me one it was a solid silver super strike he painted up.he told me that these critters are silver so why use any other color.

My question is what material in fly tying that is solid silver

without it getting torn up.

525

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RE: these critters are silver so why use any other color(?)

 

I think that's one of fly tying and fishing's million dollar questions. The best answer I can come up with is that color may not be the sole trigger that gets the fish to strike: it could be color, profile, motion, translucency, presentation, etc., singularly or in any number of combinations.

 

For example, I like to fish a large sand eel pattern called the Big Eelie. I tie it about 4.5" long. I fish it mostly at night using the original color version (white/yellow/olive/blue), a white/chartreuse/yellow version, a blue/black/purple version, a white/yellow/peacock version -- you get the idea. I catch a ton of stripers with this fly, and it doesn't ever seem to matter what color variant I'm fishing. Many times I have been catching on the bright yellow/chartreuse version, clipped it off, and tied on the black/blue purple one and go right on catching. I find this very interesting.

 

My favorite mullet pattern is Ken Abrames' September Night. The only silver in it is two strands of flash and some body braid. I tie it from about 3.5" up to 9-10". As you can see, it's mostly white. But I couldn't possibly tell you how many bass I've caught over the years on this fly.

 

The September Night

September-Night_2_.jpg

 

I know this doesn't answer your question, but I am very interested in color and how it plays into fly tying and catching. :-)

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There is another question I do have and that is.

In fly tying where do you draw the line between

a functional fly and vanity fly ie showcase fly?

some of these flies are beautiful works of art

but is that where it ends.

Does a fly have to be an eye catcher to sell?

In any case, what flies are your go to flies?

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Dave Hughes wrote, "Trout aren't interested in neatness." Stripers might be even less so.

 

The only eye the fly has to catch is the striper's. Of course, you should take pride in your work and fish flies that give you confidence. Confidence in good. :-)

 

More tomorrow.

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RE: In fly tying where do you draw the line between a functional fly and vanity fly ie showcase fly?

The only intent I have for the flies I tie is to fish them. Yes, I want them to be in proportion, be well-constructed, and pleasing to my eye. I want to have confidence in my fly. So there are elements of both form and function at play. I don't ever go for a "showcase" fly; for example, I use grade C jungle cock because I know the fly is going to get beaten up.

 

RE: some of these flies are beautiful works of art but is that where it ends.

Fly tying is an art, and different people tie for different reasons and different outcomes. Some of the classic Atlantic Salmon flies take hours to tie, are showcase pieces, and will also catch fish.

 

Bill McMillan, the great steelhead fly tier, once said that one reason he liked to tie simple flies because he didn't want to give the fish credit for being anything other than the primitive creature it is.

 

I always liked that idea.

 

RE: Does a fly have to be an eye catcher to sell?

If you mean sell to anglers, I think yes. One store owner I know says that streamer flies with eyes on them far outsell those that don't. All I ever care about is, can I sell this fly to the fish?

 

RE: In any case, what flies are your go to flies?

It depends on time/season/bait/conditions, etc.

 

Since we're heading into fall, and I will be fishing Rhode Island a lot, I will be sure to have lots of Ray's Fly (silversides), Inconspicuous (anchovies), Orange Ruthless (clamworms), September Night (mullet) and small bucktails for peanut bunker.

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IMHO it's hard to beat a basic white deceiver or an olive white deciever when the mullet are in the surf here in NJ in the Fall. I will say that I generally also do well with poppers during the mullet run, especially at dawn. I have done fine with white or red/white, but I am pretty sure lots of colors would work. I try to coordinate high falling water with false dawn around a jetty pocket and have at it.

 

As for the flies to fish vs. flies to showcase.....I tie flies to fish. My flies get eaten, lost, beat up, ho'd, and above all FISHED. I do have some on display in my office, but they are exactly the same as those I fish.

 

Just my $.02.

 

Alan

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As much as I admire perfect fascimiles, matching size, action, profile and color works almost everywhere. When there are schools of baitfish that fish are keying on, a pretty close match will work on most species. Sharp eyed species, like all of the Tunas, can get really picky.

 

When you don't have a really close match with Tunas, Jacks, and Mackerel, get as close as you can then simply burn your fly through the busting fish.

 

There were millions of Finger Mullet in the creek I fished today.(Florida) Water temperature was 88 and air temperature in the high 90's. Not many fish were harassing them though. By the time I got to the area where there was any action at all, the sun was high and I had already paddled at least 4 miles, much of it against the tide. As much as I wanted to continue fishing, I knew today was a heat stroke kind of a day so I paddled back to my truck.

 

Early in the day, I caught several Largemouths and a small Snook on a chartreuse critter. (See post re: Bass skirts for flies) I spooked a school of big Redfish by getting hung right in the middle of the school. I found lots of big Tarpon in one area but a boat came in and started chasing them with the big outboard rather than a trolling motor. I had my favorite Tarpon fly on the new Colton and was anchored just right. Busting in on somebody already fishing a school of Tarpon is no way to make friends or influence Tarpon.

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I have seen some outrageous flies & some world class tyers.

 

And you'd be very surprised on how many of them don't even fish.They tie out of love of the sport.

 

So to answer your question about drawing the line

between a functional fly and vanity fly ie showcase fly it all lies on the eye of the tyer.

 

I think most of the guys here take great pride in there work and most all if not all fish the flies they tie.

 

As far as Pretty goes, Like the old saying "Lures catch Fisherman not Fish"! cwm27.gif

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I have always done well using a simple surf candy type finger mullet imitation. Quick to tie and the polar fibre wiggles like a son-of-a-gun when retrieved.

 

HC

525

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I just match the size and profile of what I see. I don't concern myself with color, only lighter/darker colors for whatever conditions I happen to be fishing. I worry about the approach and the presentation, and never sweat the small stuff. I can't think of any detail less significant than the color of a fly when targeting opportunistic game species such as bass/tarpon/snook.

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As far as tying for show or tying for throw ? I attempt to tie the best representation of an insect or baitfish possible in the hopes of one day finding a pattern that works on days when other flies fail. I'ts not so prevalent in the surf , but in the skinny water of the marsh a redfish or sheepshead can very extremley finicky . Then compound that , with a fish that has been caught and release already that week on a Clouser and a deciever and that makes him even more tight lipped. Is fishing a realistic fly over kill? Most days I would say yes. An impressionistic fly will work very well almost in every instance . I just like tilting the odds in my favor if I can .

 

Now if you are talking about flies listed on some of the realistic forums I would say they don't have a place in flyfishing or tying .Some of these guys have no intention of ever throwing these creations in the water. Most are not even tied . They mold and sculpt epoxy and resin and layers of paint and say look at what I tied. One idiot from Spain uses piano wire instead of a hook. One guy from the netherlands cuts the eye off the hook before he starts. These guys and others like them are attempting to create fishing art not flies. They want to skip a step or two and go straight to being a tyer that is collected. If a tyer like Ron Lucas gave you a salmon fly you might want to frame it not fish it. If Bob Clouser gave you a minnow on a signed card you may not want to fish it . But in both cases you could fish them because they were flies to start with.

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