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Cornbread

Double tuff epoxy?

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I mentioned a while back I was experimenting with using etex/famowood and devcon on the same plug to try to benefit from the different qualities I like in them: the flexible toughness of bartop coat and the hardness and easy leveling properties of Devcon TT. My thinking is that the more flexible epoxy will act as a shock absorber underneath the harder devcon to give a more durable finish. Not a scientific experiment by any means but enough evidence for me to continue in this direction and get some real time (hard fishing) results to verify my findings in the real world.

 

Others have probably tried this and a lot of other combinations with better or worse results. I'm not promoting this as anything one way or the other. Just sharing my experience with one roughly organized trial that I performed for myself. I hope this will generate some ideas for other noobs to explore.

 

PROCESS: FACTS & CONDITIONS

  1. Used a lure that was a practice paint lure (a screw up from an earlier batch) - sealed & primed with oil based enamel flat white. Dried for 48 hrs.

  2. Lure colors painted with Krylon rattle cans. - Dried for 24 hrs

  3. Applied two coats of clear lacquer - Dried for 24 hours

  4. Roughed up lacquer with grey scotch bright pad. Wiped down with DA

  5. Applied famowood and flipped lure by hand every few minutes while drying for the first hour. Let epoxy coat cure 72 hours.

  6. Roughed up surface with grey scotch bright pad, wiped down with DA & applied a "medium" coat of Devcon TT.

  7. Let cure for 10 days. (no reasoning for the 10 days other than I got distracted...)

  8. Since my hand flipping process with the famowood did not allow for optimal leveling of the first coat, the Devcon naturally followed the slight imperfections of the first finish.

  9. One bright, cloudless, 101 degree day (yesterday 7/31)) I tied a 1/2 oz weight to onto the lure and, using a spinning-rod. cast out and dragged the lure in a gravel driveway (15 - twenty-five yard casts); seeing no visible damage to the finish I then banged it forcefully into the gravel 5 times.
The pictures below show the end results. I was amazed the epoxy did not crack or split at all. Only a few minor scratches and some dings in the epoxy where the wood (ERC) had been dented but no sign of a scratch or crack in the epoxy. I have a lot more pictures but these three show up the dings as clear as I can get with my camera and low level photo skills. THX & I welcome any thoughts or comments. CB

525

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Wow? WTH CB.....that is cool. I know my finish would not hold up to that.

 

I like this idea a lot. What is the "clear lacquer" that you used before the bartop and why?

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I like this idea a lot. What is the "clear lacquer" that you used before the bartop and why?

 

Hi Mokes - I used Rustoleum clear lacquer as a "binder coat" so I could rough up the finish for good bonding without messing up the color paint. If you put the clear on before the color paint is totally cured it all cures and bonds together. WATCH OUT because all paints are not compatible w/each other (like people i reckon) so always test first.

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View PostCool, nice job.

 

Is famowood the same product as Etex?

 

 

Hi ya basschamp! I believe they both are bartop coatings by different companies. Where I live it is a lot cheaper than etex. I get it a Lowe's. THX - CB

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View PostHi ya basschamp! I believe they both are bartop coatings by different companies. Where I live it is a lot cheaper than etex. I get it a Lowe's. THX - CB

 

Awesome, thanks!

 

Now you have to test it against bluefish teeth! biggrin.gif

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If I sand down the Etex, or scuff it with a red scotch brite pad, the Etex will get little white lines in it correct?

 

Those will go away when I apply new epoxy over it?

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mokes.. yes the scratches and sanding marks on epoxy will disappear with the second coat of epoxy. if the first coat has cured then sanding is the only way to get the second coat to bond to the first.

 

also, some epoxies give off a waxy coating ( called blush ) as part of the curing. before you epoxy again sanding and washing is needed to take off the blush.

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View Postmokes.. yes the scratches and sanding marks on epoxy will disappear with the second coat of epoxy. if the first coat has cured then sanding is the only way to get the second coat to bond to the first.

 

also, some epoxies give off a waxy coating ( called blush ) as part of the curing. before you epoxy again sanding and washing is needed to take off the blush.

 

 

Washing? Can you explain that further? Wipe it down with DA or something, or literally wash it?

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View PostWashing? Can you explain that further? Wipe it down with DA or something, or literally wash it?

 

 

I think Adson may be referring to a "liberal" DA wipe down - maybe he will come back and elaborate since washing with water would seem to add complications - at least for me.

 

AND the scotch brite type pad I use is the grey one (I think it compares to 00 steel wool) that makes small scratches, actually just dulls the surface; then a good wipe down using a lint free cloth & DA prior to 2nd coat. Homie stores carry these pads in different grits as a substitute for steel wool, which I find to be too messy. If you use the ones made for stripping paint they may be a little to aggressive. Do a test run on a dummy lure first so you don't get mad.gif ...

 

ALSO - I am now doing another test plug with 2 coats of Devcon TT applied using the same process as above and will give it the same rough treatment as the other for comparison. Will post pics in this same thread when done.

 

THX- CB

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CB,

 

Awsome post, and an important one.

I love the approach you took. The biggest issue I have with D2T is I paint a lot of pearl white baits and it does yellow in the sun (UV). So my question is do you think (or can you test with your next run) if the Etex first, then D2T keeps the bait from yellowing. Or, does anyone know of a UV resistant spray laquer coat that could be the final protective coat? Not as much for durability, but to calm the yellowing.

 

Thanks again for the poat, very useful!!

 

MS

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Cornbread, sounds scientific to me.

I assume TT means 2 ton?

#9 on you list, 101 degree day, cloudless. Are you indicating that the high temp/low humidity provides good conditions for using the epoxy? If so, do you, or others feel that humidity can hurt the finish process? namely a soft cure, cloudy cure etc? I think the humidity does compromise the quality of the finish.

Great info.

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View PostI think Adson may be referring to a "liberal" DA wipe down - maybe he will come back and elaborate since washing with water would seem to add complications - at least for me.

 

AND the scotch brite type pad I use is the grey one (I think it compares to 00 steel wool) that makes small scratches, actually just dulls the surface; then a good wipe down using a lint free cloth & DA prior to 2nd coat. Homie stores carry these pads in different grits as a substitute for steel wool, which I find to be too messy. If you use the ones made for stripping paint they may be a little to aggressive. Do a test run on a dummy lure first so you don't get mad.gif ...

 

ALSO - I am now doing another test plug with 2 coats of Devcon TT applied using the same process as above and will give it the same rough treatment as the other for comparison. Will post pics in this same thread when done.

 

THX- CB

 

Could I also use 220 grit sandpaper to rough up the etex?

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View PostCB,

 

Awsome post, and an important one.

I love the approach you took. The biggest issue I have with D2T is I paint a lot of pearl white baits and it does yellow in the sun (UV). So my question is do you think (or can you test with your next run) if the Etex first, then D2T keeps the bait from yellowing. Or, does anyone know of a UV resistant spray laquer coat that could be the final protective coat? Not as much for durability, but to calm the yellowing.

 

Thanks again for the poat, very useful!!

 

MS

 

 

Hi MS - Not 100% sure about the yellowing causal factors in all cases. I do know that the chemicals (especially alkyd binder compounds found in most petroleum based paints) will yellow underneath the epoxy finishes causing the whole finish to take on an amber cast. This is double trouble with most urethanes because they tend to amber over time regardless of what's beneath - similar to shellac based coatings. Which is good if you looking to get an "aged" look to your project. I think this is more pronounced in the white and other very light colors due to no offset from other color pigments.

 

Can you minimize this effect? I personally haven't tried anything but do know there are UV protective products out there by OS coatings. Not sure what paints it is compatible with. May be worth checking out. THX-CB

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View PostCornbread, sounds scientific to me.

 

View Post

I assume TT means 2 ton?

#9 on you list, 101 degree day, cloudless. Are you indicating that the high temp/low humidity provides good conditions for using the epoxy? If so, do you, or others feel that humidity can hurt the finish process? namely a soft cure, cloudy cure etc? I think the humidity does compromise the quality of the finish.

Great info.

 

 

Hi Kev - I've only been building plugs a couple years but have been building home furniture and arts and craft items for about 35 years using a lot of different coatings, stains, and finishes. I simply applied the knowledge gained with woodworking and wood carving to the lure building pursuit. My experience with epoxy coating is that it likes temps between 75 and 80 degrees, gets more "runny" at higher temps, most will melt (or soften) at about 160-200 degrees and it hates humidity about the same as urethane and shellac finishes. Where I live in South Mississippi (about 65 miles from the gulf) we have very high humidity most of the time. Even in the winter I have to run the AC in my shop at times to control humidity. I keep it below 50% in the shop if I'm going to be painting or curing. Never had a problem with blushing, clouding, or extended cure times. Again this is a description of my experience and observations of obvious cause and effect type factors. Someone more educated in the field could probably shed some light on the "why" questions and those with more plug building experience and join in with any thoughts. Sorry so long winded. Hope this is helpful. THX y'all! - CBsmile.gif

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