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darwin

NRS vs. Malone Tie Down Straps

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I have not used either one, but at the risk of going off topic...

 

I will say the Thule Tie down straps have been PERFECT. I have driven literally THOUSANDS of miles with them and they have not once, ever, slipped an inch.

 

I went from NJ to FLA and back and they were flawless.

 

Just a FWIW. sorry to hijack.beers.gif

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View PostAre NRS tie down straps any better than Malone tie down straps if they both have the metal tooth buckles?

 

I think as long as the strap material itself is not cheap and they have metal buckles they should be fine; although I havent used them.

View PostI have not used either one, but at the risk of going off topic...

 

I will say the Thule Tie down straps have been PERFECT. I have driven literally THOUSANDS of miles with them and they have not once, ever, slipped an inch.

 

I went from NJ to FLA and back and they were flawless.

 

Just a FWIW. sorry to hijack.beers.gif

 

I've driven to Maine from Pa with the Yakima tie downs, (they even have rubber guards around the metal) and they didnt slip an inch. Both Thule and Yakima products are very well built

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REI sells good house-branded tie downs (or at least they used to) at a really reasonable price - the nylon seems strong and good metal cam latches/buckles/whatever you call them. I've used them for long trips with racing shells with no problems.

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I also think the rubber over the buckle is good idea, like the yakima straps. Many a time I forgetfully toss them over the car and they bounce off the window on the other side. Everytime I silently thank the product engineer who decided to put them on.

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I have been using Thule, Barrecrafter, Yakima and NRS straps and products for years. NRS straps are or were originally designed for dealing with large river rafts, that is why offer nice long lengths.

 

I have not had any problems with the buckles on any of the straps slipping, BUT I have had slippage on straps from places Harbor Freight and lowes, etc.....Even the ones with metal buckles. The depth of knurling on the cam seems to be less, providing less grip.

 

I like the NRS straps because you can order various lengths from them to meet all of the rack needs, sometimes we are 3 deep on our racks and those long straps come in handy.

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I use the Malone straps that came with my Malone SeaWing cradles and they work just fine. No slippage problems. I also have some NRS straps that are house-branded and sold by a local kayak shop. They work very well also.

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I do not trust straps. I've seen too many laying in the highway and have seen several Kayaks in the road too.

 

Learn to tie the "Trucker's Hitch" and you will throw rocks at straps. The Trucker's Hitch is idiot proof, something you can't say for straps.

 

My yaks are held in place with rope and a Trucker's Hitch as are my boats.

 

Once you've learned to tie it, I think you will find it is faster than straps.

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View PostI do not trust straps. I've seen too many laying in the highway and have seen several Kayaks in the road too.

 

Learn to tie the "Trucker's Hitch" and you will throw rocks at straps. The Trucker's Hitch is idiot proof, something you can't say for straps.

 

My yaks are held in place with rope and a Trucker's Hitch as are my boats.

 

Once you've learned to tie it, I think you will find it is faster than straps.

 

All we use are 15 foot straps with metal buckles. Most people who loose stuff are using bungies or straps with J hooks.. If you strap over the kayak and then through a scupper it is impossible for the kayak to move forward,back,up ,down,left, or right. Rope works great but straps work just as well when done correctly but are quiker.

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View PostI do not trust straps. I've seen too many laying in the highway and have seen several Kayaks in the road too.

 

Learn to tie the "Trucker's Hitch" and you will throw rocks at straps. The Trucker's Hitch is idiot proof, something you can't say for straps.

 

My yaks are held in place with rope and a Trucker's Hitch as are my boats.

 

Once you've learned to tie it, I think you will find it is faster than straps.

 

 

Funny, I have a completely different experience. I work in a park where hundreds of kayaks each week are transported down a ten mile stretch of road at speeds up to 50 mph. They are secured with in a variety of methods: ropes, straps, bungees, etc.. In fifteen years, I can't recall seeing one fall off a vehicle on to the road. I'm not saying that it doesn't happen, but it's got to be pretty rare.

 

Anyway..You make some good points. The truckers hitch is a useful not, we use it all of the time. And, the buckles on straps can corode or jam over time. But, my preference is still a thick web flat strap. IMO, they grab the boat better than round ropes.

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I personally like ratchet straps. This allows me to tighten everything up good and keep it that way. My favorite pair cane in a set of 4 from Home Depot. they ahve rubber backed ratchets so as not to scratch anything.

FWIW, I've hauled canoes and yaks for 100Mi Plus at speeds of 70-80 and never had one loosen significantly.

 

p.s the truckers hitch IS a great tool and the only knot I'll use when I use a bow line tie off.

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