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HatterasJack

Would you drop mid $30's money for Chevy's new VOLT?

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Seems reasonable and the warranty seems decent

 

 

"DETROIT - General Motors Co said Tuesday it has begun taking orders for the electric-powered Chevrolet Volt at a $41,000 starting price ($33,500 net of the full federal tax credit, which ranges from $0-$7,500) a sticker price $5,000 higher than the top-selling sedan from its luxury Cadillac brand.

 

GM also said it would lease the much-anticipated Volt at $350 per month for three years with $2,500 as a down payment and promote that lease rate as the vehicle launches in a handful of U.S. markets starting with California.

 

GM launched the Volt development project four years ago, in part to shake an association with gas-guzzling trucks and to show it could compete with the likes of Toyota Motor Corp on hybrid technology.

 

For analysts and green car enthusiasts, the biggest question surrounding the Volt has been its price and profitability given the cost of the lithium-ion battery pack supplied by Korea's LG Chem and the engineering resources that GM devoted to the project.

 

"Every day we've been asked a single question: How much will it cost?" said GM marketing chief Joel Ewanick on a conference call to announce the pricing.

 

GM executives, including former Vice Chairman Bob Lutz, had previously indicated the Volt would be priced near $40,000.

 

Earlier in July, GM said it will guarantee the battery in the Volt for eight years or 100,000 miles in an effort to inspire confidence in the new technology.

 

The guarantee is better than warranties on GM's conventional car engines and transmissions, which are five years or 100,000 miles.

 

The rechargeable Volt is due in showrooms this November. The vehicle can travel 40 miles on battery power before a small gasoline engine takes over to generate power so the car can go longer distances. "

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I just did some reading on it and I am feel this may be hot for like a year and then fall flat. First of all the price is way high which automatically eliminates a large amount of the population. Beyond that I am sure the maint. and technology of the cars may be scary to some along with the fact that its only 40 miles you get on the electric. The price range was a poor choice cause your caught between groups of people who have possibly better options: buy the cheaper and established civic, or take your mid 30,000 and buy a nicer car without the hybrid/electric technology. It seems GM was hyping this up wayyy too much, and putting its future on it was very risky but we will see.

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I think that the basic concept is good. The problem is the cost of the battery (around $10k just for the battery). If they can get the cost of the battery down, then over time this may make more sense. At the moment, it is hard to get the numbers to work. You can get a pretty decent economy car for under $20k (Fit, Civic, Fiesta, Corolla, etc.), and the $13k in savings will buy one heck of a lot of gas.

 

From a fun-to-drive perspective, I'd rather have a Ford Fiesta with a manual anyways.

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I think it is a great idea and a US company has gotten a jump on the market for once. Warranty is above average, total range (battery+gas generator) is like 300 miles or so, can go 100 mph, and accelerates 0-60 in about 9 seconds, expensive but reasonable lease - this will drop as the technology develops and more people buy in. I have heard the idea kicking around that large retailers will offer complementary "fill ups" ie. charging while shopping. Good idea and definitely good for image.

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"Q: What is the driving range of the Chevy Volt?

 

A: The car is being designed to drive at least 40 miles on pure electricity stored in the battery from overnight home charging. After that the gas engine will kick in and allow the car to be driven up to 400 miles on a full tank (~8 gallons) of gas."

 

gas engine is as a generator to power the electric motor once the batteries are expired

 

gas motor does not propel the vehicle directly

 

just an FYI

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View PostI'll wait for the hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.

 

I'm sorry, but you'll be waiting a very long time. Hydrogen is a very bad way to power vehicles.

 

First, it takes a great deal of energy to separate hydrogen from air or water. Then it takes a great deal of energy to keep that hydrogen cooled in a tank. If you don't cool the tank, then the hydrogen boils off -- it's like coming back to the airport two weeks later only to find that your car's gas tank that was full when you parked it is now nearly empty.

 

In addition to being hard to store, hydrogen is hard to transport. You can't stick hydrogen into a pipeline in Texas and pump it up to Chicago. Well, you could, but you'd have to refrigerate the entire freaking pipeline (using more energy than you are pumping).

 

The reality is that gasoline and diesel are pretty darn good fuels for vehicles. Gasoline and diesel are easy to transport, easy to store, and have very good energy density.

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And all that energy used to produce hydrogen and store it pollutes more than running diesel and gas. I still think bio diesel is a good alternative, especially recycled cooking grease. I was driving behind one the other day and it smelled like cheeseburgers and friesdrool.gif

 

View PostI'm sorry, but you'll be waiting a very long time. Hydrogen is a very bad way to power vehicles.

 

First, it takes a great deal of energy to separate hydrogen from air or water. Then it takes a great deal of energy to keep that hydrogen cooled in a tank. If you don't cool the tank, then the hydrogen boils off -- it's like coming back to the airport two weeks later only to find that your car's gas tank that was full when you parked it is now nearly empty.

 

In addition to being hard to store, hydrogen is hard to transport. You can't stick hydrogen into a pipeline in Texas and pump it up to Chicago. Well, you could, but you'd have to refrigerate the entire freaking pipeline (using more energy than you are pumping).

 

The reality is that gasoline and diesel are pretty darn good fuels for vehicles. Gasoline and diesel are easy to transport, easy to store, and have very good energy density.

 

 

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View PostAnd all that energy used to produce hydrogen and store it pollutes more than running diesel and gas. I still think bio diesel is a good alternative, especially recycled cooking grease.

 

That only works on old style diesel engines. Modern diesel engines with high pressure direct injection systems can't use recycled cooking grease -- it destroys their fuel system.

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I paid $450 for a 2000 Ford Contour at the auction. Put another $450 into repairs. Now, for a total investment of $900, I have a car that gets 33 mpg highway, and 20 mpg in Manhattan. It can run on gasoline, or on CNG. I will drive it into the ground!

 

How does that compare to a $40,000 car that can only run 40 miles between charges?

 

Sheesh! Some people will pay ANYTHING to be "green."

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Wouldn't touch a Government Motors Corporation product. These are the same guys who said they would give you 90% of trade in against THE PRICE of a 450SL then a few years later it was 90% of a 300SL, IF you would buy a Cadillac Allante. How many Allantes has Cadillac produced in the last decade. Remember the infamous Government Motors Corporation V8 diesel of the 1980s?? Nuff said, Bolt the Volt.

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I won't but someone else will. They started this thing years ago then stopped. I wonder if part of the bailout for them said "you will build it!"?

 

I think it's priced too high for the market. You can get a couple of used Prius for the same money. How about others who need a fuel efficient car? Or those who have limited means? If someone has to buy a car that gets good mpg because the price of fuel is killing them I fail to see how they'd justify spending this much money.

 

Maybe fleets would go for this but not sure about your cities but mine isn't dropping 30k on cars for people to drive around in. They'll still buy whatever Ford/GM/Chrysler offers for a fleet car that's reasonable in price.

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rickm: the Volt isn't going to sell to people based on economics, because right now, the economics don't work. It will sell to wealthy people who want it as a status symbol of how green they are, and perhaps to some techies who think the technology is cool.

 

The only way it will become a success is if they get the cost down.

 

That said, here in the US I believe only about 3% of cars sold are hybrids. Hybrids are a niche car.

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I wouldn't spend $ 500.00 for that piece of **** from gubmit motors!!! Maybe $450.00 so I could drive it to the east lawn of 1600 Pa ave and set it on fire.

 

I can't believe anyone will fall for this trash --- but then again look at what we elect.

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View Postrickm: the Volt isn't going to sell to people based on economics, because right now, the economics don't work. It will sell to wealthy people who want it as a status symbol of how green they are, and perhaps to some techies who think the technology is cool.

 

 

The only way it will become a success is if they get the cost down.

 

 

That said, here in the US I believe only about 3% of cars sold are hybrids. Hybrids are a niche car.

 

Those who'd buy it to be green....I wonder how many are already there with other hybrids, like Prius. I know the Volt is a different technology but I can't see too many in that group buying a US car anyway. In my area the more liberal folks have hybrids, the conservatives stick with US iron. My old neighborhood was made up of Buick/Olds/Ford....imports were very rare. Where I'm at now every other driveway has a hyrid and very few of the non hybrids are US cards.

 

 

If they could get the cost down to compete with other cars it would make it a viable option for more. But 30k? Not for me.

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