Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Chris N

Bacteria disease in pepper plant?

Rate this topic

10 posts in this topic

At first, I thought my pepper plant contracted a bacterial infection (spots on the leaves & leaves easlily falling off when shaken). Now im wondering if it may be something else? Maybe the intense heat?

 

If it's bacteria, from what I can gather online, im supposed to hit it with some copper sulfate. I don't even know where the hell to find copper sulfate, nor do I know if that's the best solution. I don't think it's all TOO bad as it's still producing fruit.

 

Any ideas?

525

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you might have thrips, given the distorted foliage

 

hold a pad of white paper under a few leaves and give them a shake

 

look at the paper- if there are small, long, skinny bugs running around, you have thrips- they are light brown and have the general shape of a grain of rice, but much smaller- they can be seen with the naked eye however

 

they are tough to control, especially on vegetables where the most effective controls can't be used

 

insecticidal soap should knock them back, but will need to be re-applied

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks DB, I just sprayed some soap the other day for ants but i'll give it a shot anyways. See if maybe thats the prob.

 

EDIT: Just checked, doesn't look like thrips. Actually, now the stems are turning black where they meet the shoots frown.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris, from the picture you posted, it doesn't look too bad. It most likely is just leaf spot, or it could be mites. For the leaf spot, as you said, you can spray with copper. For the mites, you use sulfur. So the copper sulfate will cover both problems.

 

Just about all products labeled "Vegetable/Tomato Dust" are copper sulfate, and are readily available at any garden center, some hardware stores, or a place like Home Depot ot Lowes. Bonide makes various types, as well as Dragon (although I think Dragon has been bought out by Bonide.)

 

Just go to a place like that and look at labels on various Vegetable/Tomato dusts. Some will be copper sulfate with rotenone and pyrethrum, others will be copper sulfate with carbaryl and/or other things. The former is the more organic option.

 

You can use it as dust, or you can get one that has instructions for making it into a spray. Dust is okay, but a spray is easier to work with and get complete coverage with, and you also have an easier time if it happens to be a windy day when you do it.

 

As to the leaf stems turning black near the main stem, no worries there, pepper plants will do that, and it is not a sign of disease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It doesn't have the classic signs of mites per say (IE tiny webs and small tiny white spots on the leaves) but, they could be present. One of the best optiosn is to use Pyrethum which is derived from the Chrysanthemum genus of plants. It comes in a spray type of bottle and will do wonders. The bigger issue is if you do have mites they have probably already dropped eggs into the soil so that is a harder issue to overcome. Good luck either way but be vigilant as what you see for bugs is often times backed up by eggs that have already been laid and will hatch for round two/ three etc. So spray them once a week for a few weeks.

 

Best,

Ctown!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great, thanks for help guys. icon14.gif

 

One other thing, I have a zuke plant in a 5 gallon pail (basically how I grow all the veggies) and the bottom leaves are becoming yellow. Otherwise though, they are doing great on top. Im thinking it's low on nitrogen?

 

The thing took off like wildfire about a week and a half ago. I probably fertilized about a week ago with 3/4 a teaspoon of MG liquid organic fertilizer mixed in a 1/2 gallon of water. Could it need more love already? smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostIt doesn't have the classic signs of mites per say (IE tiny webs and small tiny white spots on the leaves) but, they could be present. One of the best optiosn is to use Pyrethum which is derived from the Chrysanthemum genus of plants. It comes in a spray type of bottle and will do wonders. The bigger issue is if you do have mites they have probably already dropped eggs into the soil so that is a harder issue to overcome. Good luck either way but be vigilant as what you see for bugs is often times backed up by eggs that have already been laid and will hatch for round two/ three etc. So spray them once a week for a few weeks.

 

 

Best,

 

Ctown!

 

Yes, I forgot to mention the webs with mites.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostYes, I forgot to mention the webs with mites.

 

 

smear the bottom of a leaf on a sheet of clean white paper with a board behind it

 

little red stains on the paper means you have mites- can be pretty small but they are visible

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the plant had thrips at anytime it could be spotted wilt and plant is trying to fight the infection by getting rid of leaves where the thrips fed. But if the new growth looks ok, and from the pics, it does look bacterial but that could be a secondary infection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.