Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
MightyMouse

SOL'ers with Type I diabetes!

Rate this topic

6 posts in this topic

I just contacted via email The Faustman Lab regarding their upcoming BCG Phase II clinical trial.

 

Essentially, they've used an 80 year old drug developed for TB and also used to treat bladder infections to kill off the very specific white blood cells that are known to attack islet cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for insulin production. I do not know at this point in time what the criteria for being admitted to the clinical trials is or would be, but I thought to pass this along.

 

For those that may not know, insulin is a hormone produced as I said before in the islet cells of the pancreas. The hormone works to regulate blood glucose level by essentially acting as a "key" which binds to proteins on the surface of cells, allowing glucose molecules to pass through, and thus be used for energy.

 

Sudsy, I'm looking right at you herewink.gif

 

http://www.faustmanlab.org/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I forgot to mention... apparently, if they weren't able to reverse type I diabetes in laboratory mice, I sincerely doubt they would have been able to progress to the further clinical steps, including the limited run of phase I trials with humans... which now has lead to this phase IIwink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a vaccine to prevent it may be in the somewhat near future. Good news for my younger son who obviously is at risk. Me too I guess.

 

Once your Islet cells are gone I can't see what good this drug would do. Stem cell research is needed to be able to grow new ones.

 

They are getting very close to an "artificial" pancreas. Basically a pump that continuously tests and provides insulin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So how does it work? Email the lab and say you want to participate? I was diagnosed with adult onset type 1 in 1999. My greatest fear is that my little girls may develop it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sounds like a vaccine to prevent it may be in the somewhat near future. Good news for my younger son who obviously is at risk. Me too I guess.

 

Once your Islet cells are gone I can't see what good this drug would do. Stem cell research is needed to be able to grow new ones.

 

They are getting very close to an "artificial" pancreas. Basically a pump that continuously tests and provides insulin.

 

This research is intended to find a "cure" for diabetes. This treatment will allow the pancreas to start performing normal again. Previous trials on mice have been successful. Google "Tb drug to treat diabetes" for an interesting article on this. My 15 year old was diagnosed when he was 7. This is exciting news for us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostSounds like a vaccine to prevent it may be in the somewhat near future. Good news for my younger son who obviously is at risk. Me too I guess.

 

Once your Islet cells are gone I can't see what good this drug would do. Stem cell research is needed to be able to grow new ones.

 

They are getting very close to an "artificial" pancreas. Basically a pump that continuously tests and provides insulin.

 

From what I understand, the reversal aspect of this treatment comes not only from killing off the specific white blood cells that attack the islet cells, but that in the process, once those white cells are killed off, the pancreas can actually regenerate those islet cells. That what I got from reading up on the study. I could, of course, be totally wrong about this... but let's consider:

 

If you get a staff infection, the staff bacteria finds their new lovely accommodations to their liking. They have a warm, wet environment with plenty of food, and of course, take the opportunity to divide like crazy and thus the population explodes... until the immune system can respond and deliver enough white blood cells that can kill that specific pathogen, which can take a long time. Antibiotics speed up the process, but it still takes a significant amount of time for the body to "load the clip" so to speak to overwhelm not only the bacteria that are present at the infection site, but also overwhelm the reproduction rate of new bacteria.

 

While your immune system might be a little better primed for the next staff infection, should you get one, it still does not preclude another instance of staff to not only take hold, but also propagate, but essentially explode in numbers until the cycle repeats itself...

 

Obvious note: this is not a perfect analogy by any means... just to point out that it may in fact be a case where the islet cells can regenerate after the white blood cells are no longer present in numbers to overwhelm their ability to do so... that's what I'm hoping, at the very leastredface.gifredface.gifredface.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.