Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
k4lnamja

Anyone use sandworms?

Rate this topic

10 posts in this topic

For some reason I always thought they were called bloodworms until today! I'm an idiot.

 

Anyways, I remembered I used to dig for them in the sand or in mussel beds. I don't remember if they work on cods (lings or cabazons) off the rocks but I do know they def. work well with perch and other fish off the surf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't used them (West Coast), but I have used kelp worms. On an Oregon estuary, there is super fine clamming. Now and then I see something that looks like a shell husk of a shrimp. That is the visible portion of a kelp worm. They are huge and it is hard to get them whole with the shovel. But they are a tough bait that stays on well. Razor clam necks are great for staying on well, too. But sand shrimp are extremely numerous and a fish treat so they are used more than anything else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We used something called pile worms when fishing the rivers at night for stripers. Napa river, Sacramento river.

 

Rumor was they were flown in from the north East.

 

Very bloody, and they had a pair of pinchers in the mouth that really hurt if they got you!

 

Maybe they were Bay area blood worms?

 

About a foot or so long, 1/2" diameter, very bloody when you ran the hooks in. Dark reddish brown in color.

 

Worked for stripers, my fishing buddy caught a 39 pounder at Rio Vista one night. Still have a polaroid photo of him holding the fish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are both blood worm and pile worms the difference is the blood worms have 4 pinchers in their mouths and the pile worms have 2 pinchers. Where you find them they will work very well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bloodworms have 4 "jaws" and are carnivorous. They feed by extending a large proboscis that bears four hollow jaws. The jaws are connected to glands that supply poison which they use to kill their prey, and their bite is painful even to a human. They are preyed on by other worms, by bottom-feeding fish and crustaceans, and by gulls.

 

Pile worms have 2 "jaws" used to capture small invertebrates or graze on detritus and plant material. Usually feeds at night.

 

Both can get to be 12"-14".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.