Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
drumfish213

Basement Refinishing

Rate this topic

16 posts in this topic

I am going to have my basement refinished now that I have a drainage system installed. It seems that there are 2 main options out there; traditional studs and drywall or basement systems that use panels. Does anyone have experience or a preference with either of these? I assume the traditional way would give me more options about where the walls were, but the panels seem to be more resistant to water and moisture. Any recommendations for companies in the Monmouth County NJ area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are tons of ways to do basements and alot of opinions, when I do mine here is how I am going to do it, first I will paint the walls and floors with a concrete sealer to help with moisture, my basement is dry plus I run a de-humidifier in my basement during the summer, then I will run 1 1/2 inch thick foam insulation board around the perimeter of the basement, this will prevent a thermal break between the concrete foundation and your new interior wall, then I will frame my walls using kiln dried studs with a pressure treated plate on the floor, do all your electricial work then I would use the paper-less drywall for the walls, I've heard good things about this stuff, then do your trim, paint and a drop ceiling to top it off,but like I said there are alot of opinions on how to finish a basementsmile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer the asthetic of traditional framing and sheetrock.. My neighbor did the panel thing last year. It's nice, but I don't like the vertical seems every 4 feet. It looks too modular. He loves it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what kind of "drainage system" do you have? im assuming you mean a french drain to a sump, in which case you really shouldnt be framing right up against your wall anyway.

 

i have a french drain system. im about 2 months in to my basement project, doing a couple hours every night after work and im 90% done with the framing. im using 2x4studs and PT wood on the baseplates. its really a simple process as long as you have the right tools and patience. i figure im about $700 all in so far including the nail gun and assorted power tools that i probably will never use again but had to have. if i would have hired someone to do this so far i think i would be up to about 5grand. its simple if you have time and patience, and the right tools.

 

the only roadblocks so far have been getting approvals from the wife. im trying to figure out how to squeeze a bathtub into our new bathroom plans without having to re route all the old cast iron original plumbing stuffbeatin.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After finally finishing my basement her is what I have learned:

 

Draw a good sketch/plan and think about what you are going to be putting in the room(s) and plan your design around that. I did not do this and now I can not put something where I wanted them and might be a few inches short where I want something that I could have compensated for if I though it out better.

 

Electrical - Think hard on this one. Think about running extra runs to some of the rooms for expansion. You can never have to much. If you have a shop area - plan it out and put a sub panel in it.

 

Floor: Check that it is level and will work with what you are planning to use for flooring. I had to rip out about half of the floor and put in about 100 bags or cement to re-level it. If you use floor leveler be careful read the directions and clean and score the ares you are going to level. I put down 36 bags of the expensive ($30/bag) and had it pop off. Seal the floor after a month and take care of all and I do mean all moisture problems.

 

Studs - I went with wood with doubled plates on the bottom.

 

Rock - I would go with green board next time for the bottom 4' or the paper less board. It will get wet eventually.

 

Insulation: I would go with the spray foam for the walls and the ceiling.

 

Sound Proof - I would rethink this one. I should have use the metal sound channel strips and then hung the celling. I would evan think about shooting the celling with foam.

 

One Last One - Make sure you have all the electrical, cable, phone, Cat 5, plumbing, etc run in the basement and THE REST OF THE HOUSE. Stinks cutting into a fresh paint job.

 

Brad

 

PS - If you can get a bathroom in the basement it is a great thing. A refrigerator also is a big plus. Some basic requirements of the man cave...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View Postwhat kind of "drainage system" do you have? im assuming you mean a french drain to a sump, in which case you really shouldnt be framing right up against your wall anyway.

 

I have a drainage system that runs the perimeter and feeds to a sump pump, similar to a french drain. I figured i would have to frame away from the walls because of it. I will also need to factor in a way to get to the clean outs that are built into the drainage system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

had one quote yesterday for a basement system with the panels. materials looked pretty interesting. each panel is insulated and they fit together and then the seem is caulked. the panels are mold, mildew, and water resistant and fireproof. each panel has a channel running in it floor to ceiling so dropping in any sort of wire is easy. they are paintable. the only issue is the price. it seemed pretty expensive, so i am going to get some more estimates for other systems and also for doing traditional studs and drywall. the contractor for the system went on and on about how bad drywall in a basement is but I am sure that is part of his job. I realize that it can hold water and mold, but if it is a ton cheaper that may be my only option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can always use moisture resistant drywall. The added cost is small. Also if you frame it with metal studs you reduce the chance of mold and water damage drastically.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The method that makes the most sense to me is to apply foam insulation directly against the foundation (spray or sheets) and build your walls in front of that.

 

Google building science corporation, they have a bunch of free articles on basements, insulation, and mold.

 

cwm8.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

metal studs, greenboard or the new paperless for all walls, DROP CIELING!!! i hate having to cut open nice sheetrocked ceilings for new a/c lines or to replace a thermostat wire....mad.gifmad.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
View PostThe method that makes the most sense to me is to apply foam insulation directly against the foundation (spray or sheets) and build your walls in front of that.

 

 

Google building science corporation, they have a bunch of free articles on basements, insulation, and mold.

 

 

cwm8.gif

 

this is a great website. thanks so much clapping.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just posted a question about a basement ventilation system I'm thinking of making. I just put it out to the DIY jury and am waiting for a verdict. Thought you may be interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.