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NJdeadfisher

Finally starting up fly fishing

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Hey guys,

After looking into fly fishing for the past year online, I finally decided its time to actually do instead of just reading. I saw that a local sports shop is included in the trout unlimited/orvis fly fishing 101 course and signed up for July 3rd. Ive been reading up on fly rods and flies, but I figured its always good to get opinions from a bunch of people who fly fish regularly. I am looking into getting an 8'6" 5 wt. St. Croix Rio Santo rod and a Pflueger 1494 Medalist reel. Any thoughts on that setup? Seemed pretty good to me and total price is around $130 so not a huge dent in my wallet (I just graduated college and am feeling the recession w/ no job). I was also hoping you guys could steer me towards a couple of key flies to buy. I'm planning on fishing medium to large streams for trout and bass. Thanks for the help guys!

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Rod and Reel - sounds perfect to me, i don't know it exactly but as long as the wt. rod, reel and line are matching you'll be fine. A 101 class is perfect for the hardest thing at first is proper technique and approach. After that you can hone in on your style. Most important thing for me was understand how the fly line/rod works and why it works that way. Once i figured it out, casting form made complete sense.

 

LMB are easy, small poppers are perfect. Minnows that match baby perch or bass will too. poppers are most effective.

 

Trout is another can of worms, theres a bazillion flies -dry,wet, emerger, etc.. It is a match the hatch game where you fish flies that are hatching at the time of the year. the type of fly usually corresponds with a type of fishing technique.

 

good luck. start with panfish & bass, they are too easy....

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The setup is fine, and for bass,panfish, and trout on a 5wt, the reel is just a place to hold the line, so any old reel will do when you are starting out. Keep it cheap and fish for what you know how to catch.

 

When I started out with the fly rod I went after LMB,SMB, and panfish. Then I "graduated" to trout and was a trout bum until I learned to catch stripers.

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I would find the cheapest rod that has a cork handle and is a 5wt and is 9' long and is like a piece of cooked spaghetti in terms of action. These generally come with reels and lines in a combo.

 

I second BOBinCT on the reel just being a place to hold line so buy the cheapest possible

 

I would buy wooly buggers, prince nymphs, ants, beatles, elkhair caddis, and some zonker minnows for a start.

 

It's an expensive hobby.

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When you go to the 101 school this weekend, they will have rods set up and ready to use; I will be helping out at the schools in the Arlington, VA Orvis if anyone reading this in the area. Talk to the guys at the fly shop to see what they recommend for you to start out, take up TU's offer to join for free and go to meetings to meet members and see if you can go fish with a member (the old retired guys would love to take out a young, unemloyed beginner that can fish during the week). Try out a few rods and line combinations if possible before buying, get what you can afford and like.

 

To save money, (1) cut all reasonable corners first on the reel (Pflueger Medalist is a good idea), (2) find a good and reasonable priced rod (presumably something you have already cast) and (3) DON'T go cheap on line. Get a good weight forward fly line that matches you rod, which will run you $50-70 but the Orvis gift card included in the class can save you some money here. I clearly remember being in your shoes in college and the first fly rod I got seeming really expensive at $250 for the whole package of rod/reel/line/leader. I hate to say it, but you will eventually get the job, buy more and better gear in the future; I don't think many of us here still only have our first fly rods, you will get more in the future and this won't be the most important decision in your life.

 

Get some wooly buggers in size 6-10 in a variety of colors, these can be fished in a large variety of ways for both trout and bass. You don't need perfect presentation in the same way you do for dry flies with these streamers. Getting too involved with hatches and nymphs would probably be unproductive at first, you have a lot to worry about simply learning to cast right now.

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I wouldn't buy anything until you have gone to the class. They should be able to point you in the right direction.

Also check out the Albright line. Some really great inexpensive Rods.

Check out there closeout section.

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Wow a lot of great stuff. Thanks a lot guys. I know that I'm jumping the gun a bit by already looking up a rod/reel setup, but to put it simply I was a bio major, and I get really excited about stuff when I am first introduced to them. Luckily I have some cash stored away and have allocated $250-300 for my full setup including flies so I'm sure that I'll be fine. Thanks again for the help guys and keep it comin' cuz I'll keep reading

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View PostWhen you go to the 101 school this weekend, they will have rods set up and ready to use; I will be helping out at the schools in the Arlington, VA Orvis if anyone reading this in the area. Talk to the guys at the fly shop to see what they recommend for you to start out, take up TU's offer to join for free and go to meetings to meet members and see if you can go fish with a member (the old retired guys would love to take out a young, unemloyed beginner that can fish during the week). Try out a few rods and line combinations if possible before buying, get what you can afford and like.

 

To save money, (1) cut all reasonable corners first on the reel (Pflueger Medalist is a good idea), (2) find a good and reasonable priced rod (presumably something you have already cast) and (3) DON'T go cheap on line. Get a good weight forward fly line that matches you rod, which will run you $50-70 but the Orvis gift card included in the class can save you some money here. I clearly remember being in your shoes in college and the first fly rod I got seeming really expensive at $250 for the whole package of rod/reel/line/leader. I hate to say it, but you will eventually get the job, buy more and better gear in the future; I don't think many of us here still only have our first fly rods, you will get more in the future and this won't be the most important decision in your life.

 

Get some wooly buggers in size 6-10 in a variety of colors, these can be fished in a large variety of ways for both trout and bass. You don't need perfect presentation in the same way you do for dry flies with these streamers. Getting too involved with hatches and nymphs would probably be unproductive at first, you have a lot to worry about simply learning to cast right now.

 

 

 

Either buy a rod wiht a warranty or buy the cheapest rod you can find.

 

I would also buy a little bamboo popper if possible. Those are good.

 

$50-70 for a first fly line? You must be joking, sir. How much is cortland or SA basic line these days?

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View PostEither buy a rod wiht a warranty or buy the cheapest rod you can find.

 

I would also buy a little bamboo popper if possible. Those are good.

 

$50-70 for a first fly line? You must be joking, sir. How much is cortland or SA basic line these days?

 

 

I just looked up the low end SA fly lines, seems like they run about $25, if you don't include the level lines I've seen at K-Mart for $7. You are going to get much more performance out of spending an additional $25-45 on fly line than you will spending that same amount of money on a rod or reel; and I would encourage him or any other beginner to buy fly lines in that price range if their budgets allow. The high end lines have better tapers that aid in turn over and are made with better materials that aid in shooting (not just a coating that quickly wears off with cheap lines)--a beginning caster needs all the help they can get. This is not to say that every $70 fly line is great, but the best lines I have used are in this range.

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I've introduced beginning fly fishers with the Reddington Crosswaters 5 wt combo kit. It comes with rod, reel, line, backing and leader. All you have to do is tie on a fly. It's only $129. I was also at Cabela's last week and they sell a comparable 9 ft 5wt combo kit for $89. Fly fishing is a lot like golf. In the beginning I wouldn;t go out and spend a lot of money. You can catch fish with a starter kit.

 

With a 5 wt you can catch trout and also small schoolie stripers or snappers in saltwater.

 

For trout, nymph fishing is easy and alot of fun. Learn to tie on two nymphs in tandem about 20 inches apart on 4X tippet. Say, a bead head prince fly and a nead head pheasant tail both size 14 or 16. Use a strike indicator. Cast upstream and dead drift past you. Set the hook downstream. Try to release the fish gently. Lots to learn in casting and mending, reading water etc. Good luck.

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View PostLuckily I have some cash stored away and have allocated $250-300 for my full setup including flies so I'm sure that I'll be fine.

 

(Italics mine)

 

Ha ha ha. Famous last wordswink.gif!

 

View PostI've introduced beginning fly fishers with the Reddington Crosswaters 5 wt combo kit. It comes with rod, reel, line, backing and leader. All you have to do is tie on a fly. It's only $129. I was also at Cabela's last week and they sell a comparable 9 ft 5wt combo kit for $89. Fly fishing is a lot like golf. In the beginning I wouldn;t go out and spend a lot of money. You can catch fish with a starter kit.

....bead head pheasant tail both size 14 or 16. Use a strike indicator. Cast upstream and dead drift past you. Set the hook downstream. Try to release the fish gently. Lots to learn in casting and mending, reading water etc. Good luck.

 

 

I second Westpostflyguy's advice. That Cabela's kit sounds like a good start. I'd go cheap to begin with so you can break or ruin the stuff without paying a huge financial penalty. Seems like the more basic rods are easier to cast because they are slower action--at least that was the case in 03 when I started. Beware marketing that pushes you to buy a fast action rod to be "cool".

 

Flies cost $2 each by the way! It'll add up quick. But you should be fine, you've set $250-300 aside for thiscwm31.gifcwm27.gif.

 

I think my cashometer is at about $4000 at this point.

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...

I think my cashometer is at about $4000 at this point.

 

This stuff adds up quick, I had no clue how much I had spent on my gear until my car was broken into and a couple rods and a reel case were stolen. This was a significant portion of my total gear but the amount of stuff I produced reciepts for to send to the insurance company was over $3000. This doesn't include the five rods and two reels left in the house, boxes full of flies that I have and the more that I have lost, thousand(s of) dollars of fly tying gear/materials, inflatable pontoon, kayak, pairs of waders, several pairs of wading boots, books, DVDs... I could keep going here.

 

YIKES, but this stuff is fun.

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