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Anyone ever seen this before??????

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Out in the boat on Sunday morning. Water was very calm and I started noticing a bunch of breaks in the water. Changed direction and moved closer to investigate. Got right up to the edge of the mass and noticed it was hundreds and hundreds of dogfish or small sharks of some sort. They were all just loafing on the surface with the dorsal fins out of the water, not feeding or interacting with each other, just kind of sitting there. I have never seen this before, there were acres of them.

 

Anyone else ever seen this. If so, what were they doing on the surface like that? If they were dogfish, I thought they were a bottom dweller, why were they on top? Mating, feeding, what? If they were juvenile sharks, what kind do you think they were? They all looked to be 2-4 or 5 ft long. Oh yeah, I was in about 75 feet of water when I pulled up on them.

 

Sorry, didn't have a camera with me. redface.gif

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View PostOut in the boat on Sunday morning. Water was very calm and I started noticing a bunch of breaks in the water. Changed direction and moved closer to investigate. Got right up to the edge of the mass and noticed it was hundreds and hundreds of dogfish or small sharks of some sort. They were all just loafing on the surface with the dorsal fins out of the water, not feeding or interacting with each other, just kind of sitting there. I have never seen this before, there were acres of them.

 

Anyone else ever seen this. If so, what were they doing on the surface like that? If they were dogfish, I thought they were a bottom dweller, why were they on top? Mating, feeding, what? If they were juvenile sharks, what kind do you think they were? They all looked to be 2-4 or 5 ft long. Oh yeah, I was in about 75 feet of water when I pulled up on them.

 

Sorry, didn't have a camera with me. redface.gif

 

Probably doggies.I've heard of guys actually spinning a prop trying to cross them.

They suck,by the way.smile.gif

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View PostOut in the boat on Sunday morning. Water was very calm and I started noticing a bunch of breaks in the water. Changed direction and moved closer to investigate. Got right up to the edge of the mass and noticed it was hundreds and hundreds of dogfish or small sharks of some sort. They were all just loafing on the surface with the dorsal fins out of the water, not feeding or interacting with each other, just kind of sitting there. I have never seen this before, there were acres of them.

 

 

Anyone else ever seen this. If so, what were they doing on the surface like that? If they were dogfish, I thought they were a bottom dweller, why were they on top? Mating, feeding, what? If they were juvenile sharks, what kind do you think they were? They all looked to be 2-4 or 5 ft long. Oh yeah, I was in about 75 feet of water when I pulled up on them.

 

 

Sorry, didn't have a camera with me. redface.gif

 

yes and you can plan on seeing more in the future mad.gifmad.gifmad.gif

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Dog fish spawn out in the winter and migrate inshore in the spring. Over the years, I've seen the same thing, numerous times Dog fish migrate on the surface at night into the early morning and head to deeper water in the day in schools. I've also see skate do the same thing.wink.gif . \\

Looks like they are on schedule to eff up flukinmad.gifbiggrin.gif

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View Postheadscratch.gif I am thinking maybe a bowfishing set up as standard equipment on the boat, just in case I run into this again! biggrin.gif

 

don't get caught.. they are protected... you know... because there is a serious shortage of them rolleyes.gifmad.gif

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View PostIt would be strictly catch and release! biggrin.gif

 

I have a great release technique that usually tames the pack for a few minutes..but if they are under you.. you gotta move mad.gif

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Spiny dogfish are theorized to mate in the winter, but even then it's not definite. Yet, the smooth dogfish is known to do the deed between May and September. I'd venture to guess what you experienced was one big arse orgy.

 

On a side note, you could have thrown a couple of sticks of dynamite in the water and killed all the breeders in one shot. You would have done all Rhody anglers a big favor. icon14.gif

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View Postdon't get caught.. they are protected... you know... because there is a serious shortage of them rolleyes.gifmad.gif

 

 

I've seen it mucho times, so far it's always been in the mornings when I'm heading out at 1st light.

 

I thought that they were removed from the protected status to 'threatened' or something like that - I'm just going on hear-say tho -

 

I was also told that in the UK most of the fish from their famous "fish 'n chips" is dogg

 

they can foul a good fluking hole quickly. If you're into them, move on...

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View Postdon't get caught.. they are protected... you know... because there is a serious shortage of them rolleyes.gifmad.gif

 

 

From the MA marine finfish regulations

 

 

Spiny Dogfish

 

Open All Year size No Limit Possesion No Limit

 

Game on!!

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View PostFrom the MA marine finfish regulations

 

 

Spiny Dogfish

 

 

 

Open All Year size No Limit Possesion No Limit

 

 

Game on!!

 

Dude, your in the Rhode Island forum. .

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