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sundance18

Docking

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Hi all, I still new at using my boat and some times I have trouble coming in docking when the wind is blowing hard right off the dock. Is trick to this or do I just need more experience? Thanks

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nice one sea dog. That will surely catch their attention.

 

You are having a problem driving INTO the wind? On shallower-draft boats especially, this is an issue, because there is a LOT more of the boat out of the water, and it catches wind, and can basically go any direction it wants. Also, the props we use are meant to go forward. YES, they will go in reverse, but not NEARLY the efficiency of going forward, so turning and what not can be much harder. Practice will help, but it's tougher in a single-screw boat to get her heading the way you want.

 

As stated, don't hesitate to ask for help.

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Try heading bow into the wind/perpendicular with the dock. A few feet before the dock come hard to port/or starboard. They key is throttle control, speed and and understanding your boats reaction time. A spring line rigged on the dock side of the boat is a good idea when single handed. Also, for me I find slower is better. By making a slow approach, I can get a feel for what the water and wind are doing to my boat before I get near the dock.

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Outboard or I/O?

 

If you don't know what that is, can you see the engine on the back or notwink.gif

 

Edit: Ah, never mind....

 

Learn how to walk the stern of your boat. In reverse, you can pull your stern to port or starboard by swing the engine quickly.

 

So, based on your description that the wind is coming off the dock on your starboard, I would approach the dock at about a 20-45 degree angle (depends on how hard it's blowing) slowly, then put it in reverse a few feet from the dock and swing the wheel hard starboard and give it gas - this should put the boat parallel to the dock a few feet away with initertial motion towards it. You need to practice this with one or two friends in the boat and on the dock. Have your lines ready and fenders out.

 

BTW, it's always easier to dock and maneuver a single screw vessel towards the starboard side, due to the prop rotation direction.

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One thing for sure, you need to know your boat. Check these guys, I bet they know their boats pretty good

" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXWiM...eature=related

 

That guy, not so much wink.gif

 

" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-REHi...eature=related

 

Or maybe you want to start like this biggrin.gif

 

" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHT-0...eature=related

 

Marc..

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Practice of course

The most simple answer i have is dont take it out of gear,the wind will get you , shift to nutral & then reverse only when more than the bow is IN the slip.

Don't give up the power

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Thanks all for the advice. I think the problem I had the last time out was the wind was blowing due south and the dock faces to the north. It was the first time the wind was in that direction at this marina

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View Post the wind was blowing due south and the dock faces to the north. It was the first time the wind was in that direction

 

Won't be the last time either...remember what you did or didn't want to do!

Good Luck!

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