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jaymbone

Surf Reel Suggestions

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What do you suggest for a reel to match up ? I have a SSM 650 w/ 50# PP, a 550 slammer w/ 40# PP (using now) and a penn 704z w/ 20# fireline and a spare 704 reel w/ 50# PP ready to be added. I am currently using the 550 for tossing tins and lures, but are one of the others better for distance with a 10' 0.75-4 oz St Croix Premier surf rod? Thanks for the advise on advance!

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I think the 750 or the Slammer would be the best bet. The old Penns weren't all that braid friendly, but the new ones are pretty good. I use a 560 Slammer myself and my dad uses a 750. He has some some more knot issues than me, but I just think that's mostly user error. The 750 holds more line, but the height of the spools are pretty similar, so one shouldn't cast much better than the other.

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The 704's work fine with Fireline. I have three of them spooled with it and have fished them extensively.

 

The great thing about them is that they last forever.

 

Over time I find I'm migrating away from most other reels and towards 704's and 710's. There's just too much maintenance with newer reels and they don't stand up to use on a seasonal basis, never mind years after the fact.

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View PostOut of the reels you've mentioned, the Slammer is the most braid friendly. The 704 and 750 are on the heavy side too.

 

While I agree about weight, much of that becomes moot when the rod and reel are well balanced.

 

I've been dealing with Tendonitis for years. At the worst it was so bad that I couldn't change presets on my car radio.

 

Early this past season I had some major issues with my hands and wrist due to badly balanced setups. Once I managed to get ahold of one that was balanced it changed everything.

 

Barring something unreasonably heavy, the weight of the reel is a negligible factor when your setup is properly balanced.

 

I will concede though that most off-the-shelf setups are not put together with balance in mind. Hence this Winter I will likely get to take a crash course in setting up a rod for balance.

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Is it me but doesn't the 704 cast like crap? I have 20# fireline and when I was breaking it in, my 650ssm out casted it with ease (I was using a different rod at the time b/c my premier did not come in yet... I do plan on using the 704 when I hit MTK this fall but am wondering about the distance with say 1.5 oz crocodile and a 1-3 oz castmaster on this rod.

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View PostWhile I agree about weight, much of that becomes moot when the rod and reel are well balanced.

 

I've been dealing with Tendonitis for years. At the worst it was so bad that I couldn't change presets on my car radio.

 

Early this past season I had some major issues with my hands and wrist due to badly balanced setups. Once I managed to get ahold of one that was balanced it changed everything.

 

Barring something unreasonably heavy, the weight of the reel is a negligible factor when your setup is properly balanced.

 

I will concede though that most off-the-shelf setups are not put together with balance in mind. Hence this Winter I will likely get to take a crash course in setting up a rod for balance.

 

 

No offense but I don't believe in balancing the reel to rod. I like the lightest setup possible without giving up performance. If "good balance" were the only case, people would be adding weight to their butt section since the balance is greatly multiplied to the top section once you add the resistance of the plug/lead. You still have to carry around the whole setup regardless. That's why strong, lighter gear IN GENERAL costs more. Light is the way to go - you just offset the resistance of the plug with your arm or body during retrieve or fish fighting - that's all. Of course the setup has to be practical to what you're fishing. My tip doesn't stay stationary while plugging - try a constant side sweep motion with a heavy setup and you'll see what I mean. Of course, I may not fish like you and it's just my opinion and preference based on my style of fishing.

 

Edit: I don't have tendonitis, I have light gear - maybe a coincidence. Jus' sayin'. biggrin.gif

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View PostIs it me but doesn't the 704 cast like crap? I have 20# fireline and when I was breaking it in, my 650ssm out casted it with ease (I was using a different rod at the time b/c my premier did not come in yet... I do plan on using the 704 when I hit MTK this fall but am wondering about the distance with say 1.5 oz crocodile and a 1-3 oz castmaster on this rod.

 

I had a 704 with me and fished it on MTK in some ugly conditions. The weather was so bad and I got knocked over so many times I wouldn't consider anything other than the 704 for it.

 

View PostNo offense but I don't believe in balancing the reel to rod. I like the lightest setup possible without giving up performance. If "good balance" were the only case, people would be adding weight to their butt section since the balance is greatly multiplied to the top section once you add the resistance of the plug/lead. You still have to carry around the whole setup regardless. That's why strong, lighter gear IN GENERAL costs more. Light is the way to go - you just offset the resistance of the plug with your arm or body during retrieve or fish fighting - that's all. Of course the setup has to be practical to what you're fishing. My tip doesn't stay stationary while plugging - try a constant side sweep motion with a heavy setup and you'll see what I mean. Of course, I may not fish like you and it's just my opinion and preference based on my style of fishing.

 

Edit: I don't have tendonitis, I have light gear - maybe a coincidence. Jus' sayin'. biggrin.gif

 

Actually, the Shimano Tiralejo does have a system where weights are put into the butt end of the rod.

 

Style will have alot to do with it. I'm not a side-sweep guy; I tend to go vertical with movement, not so much horizontal, and I tend to do so very smoothly.

 

Lightness is a big part of it. I switched from a 10 foot Triumph to an 8 foot Triumph and 9 foot Airwave. They are lighter rods. But I noticed that when coupled with reels that balanced it I had less pain in my hands and could go out and fish longer.

 

I experience some of the same thing with guitars when I play out; I can't handle a three-set night with an axe that's neck heavy like a Flying V. But give me a 10 pound mahogany Les Paul with the weight in the body and a thick enough leather strap and I'm fine.

 

I've spent almost 15 years managing Tendonitis and RSI; I play guitar, work with computers and fish. It's pretty much a given that this is a battle I'll be fighting for the long-term.

 

Some of it may have to do with style of fishing, some of it may have to do with the level of discomfort, some of it may have to do with weight. I think much of it lies with the individual. But from my experiences a well-balanced rod means less work the forearm has to do to keep it in balance. That's all.

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