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MightyMouse

Wind direction, intensity, and baitfish concentration

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We all know that persistent winds will start to concentrate forage up against the shore, as long as it's blowing on shore for a long enough period...

 

When I'm scouting areas to fish based on forecasts, I think that the extremes of bays and estuaries would be best with at least several straight hours of significant wind to pile up enough water and thus the bait with it...

 

I'd think more open beaches could concentrate bait in lighter to moderate winds, if it's relatively deep and theirs usually a pronounced "sweep" along that particular beach, and that shallower beaches and large bays might require a pretty good blow to pile up the water and thus the bait... again, assume that for each beach, respectively, the wind would be on shore for a significant number of straight hours...

 

have you more experienced anglers seen this logic to be true? Or am I completely nuts?headscratch.gif

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Many more things in the equation.

Here are a few that jump out in my mind.

What type of bait? Sand Eels, for example, behave differently than Bunker with regard to the wind.

How long has the wind been from the same quarter? Too much of the same is rarely good.

How is the wind effecting the tide/current? Is it pushing more water or going against the tide/current?

How is the wind effecting water temps? Certain wind direction might hinder a bite by keeping the water temps from warming in the spring, where as the same direction wind might be great in the fall by cooling the water a bit.

Since bait and STRUCTURE are the keys, how the wind works with the structure is also key.

For example, I've been fishing one spot that is best on WSW wind because of how that wind works with the current to pile bait on a piece of structure. At another spot I fish, NNW is better because that wind moves a rip line closer. The bait relates to the rip line, it will be in that rip regardless of the wind (for the most part) so having the wind move the rip just makes for better angles to fish that rip.

 

Food for thought.

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It is a common misconception that wind "blows the bait fish to the beach". It just seems that way. What actually happens is that an onshore wind blows warmer surface water into the surf zone. The warmer water in turn attracts/starts the entire food chain, phytoplankton, zooplankton, small baitfish, larger predator fish, surf fisherman.

 

DZ

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Good question. I have never seen any correlation between wind and bait, and I've tried to prove the theory several times with the boat and a very good sounder. I have set out on this quest several times in the fall when we've had sustained NW or NE winds and there was plenty of bait in the water, yet I never seen this phenomena.

 

If its true, I've never seen it. Sounds good on paper though.

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View PostGood question. I have never seen any correlation between wind and bait, and I've tried to prove the theory several times with the boat and a very good sounder. I have set out on this quest several times in the fall when we've had sustained NW or NE winds and there was plenty of bait in the water, yet I never seen this phenomena.

 

If its true, I've never seen it. Sounds good on paper though.

 

 

I've heard that wind can affect bait fish and thus target fish but I too haven't actually seen a coordinatation between wind and bait fish. In fact, I've experience just the opposite where the target fish where holding on the leeward side of shore and not the windward side of shore.

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View PostI've heard that wind can affect bait fish and thus target fish but I too haven't actually seen a coordinatation between wind and bait fish. In fact, I've experience just the opposite where the target fish where holding on the leeward side of shore and not the windward side of shore.

 

Funny you say that - if anything I've seen the same a couple of times but don't know if that was coincidence or not. I think it was just coincidence since the bait had been holding there for a while, and they certainly didn't get pushed to the winward side.

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View PostIt is a common misconception that wind "blows the bait fish to the beach". It just seems that way. What actually happens is that an onshore wind blows warmer surface water into the surf zone. The warmer water in turn attracts/starts the entire food chain, phytoplankton, zooplankton, small baitfish, larger predator fish, surf fisherman.

 

DZ

 

Wow... I opened a real can of worms hereredface.gifredface.gifredface.gifredface.gif

 

I think it's time to do some researchbiggrin.gif

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I have been fishing a couple spots of shallow water and they have been producing very well with the wind at my back or no wind at all. Tons of sand eels and spearing. When the wind turns onshore, the bite slows down big time. I was always told that wind in your face is the place, but it seems to be the opposite lately,

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View PostI have been fishing a couple spots of shallow water and they have been producing very well with the wind at my back or no wind at all. Tons of sand eels and spearing. When the wind turns onshore, the bite slows down big time. I was always told that wind in your face is the place, but it seems to be the opposite lately,

 

If the wind at your back is consistent and long-lasting, could it be upwelling bringing up nutrients from deeper water?

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Wind at your back won't cause upwelling. On most of the East Coast, S causes upwelling. But then I looked at your location and got to wondering.... Does W cause upwelling on LI? Anyone know?

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View PostI have been fishing a couple spots of shallow water and they have been producing very well with the wind at my back or no wind at all. Tons of sand eels and spearing. When the wind turns onshore, the bite slows down big time. I was always told that wind in your face is the place, but it seems to be the opposite lately,

 

That's a product of the shallow water and the sand eels. Usually NS.biggrin.gif Very specific & more often than not Spring.

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